Why Uber’s fate could herald backlash against ‘digital disruptors’

Bumpy Ride

Well-Known Member
It just isn't smart to drive Uber full time. Part time less than 30 hours is the way to go. It sucks that some people don't have a choice.
 

Karl Marx

Well-Known Member
It just isn't smart to drive Uber full time. Part time less than 30 hours is the way to go. It sucks that some people don't have a choice.

I would say that even a person doing Uber part time is still creating a personal and financial liability for themselves. The risks out weigh the meagre rewards.
 

columbuscatlady

Well-Known Member
Yeah. With UE, the more you drive the less you make. At the end of the day it starts paying me $1.98/trip because the trips become shorter. I turn off app and go home then.
 

babalu

Well-Known Member
Part time after your full time job???
Wake up 6:30am be at workplace at 8:00am work till 5:00 pm and go out and [email protected]@ with uber until whenever.
Uber drivers oops partners are all safe drivers:biggrin:
 

Karl Marx

Well-Known Member
Part time after your full time job???
Wake up 6:30am be at workplace at 8:00am work till 5:00 pm and go out and [email protected]@ with uber until whenever.
Uber drivers oops partners are all safe drivers:biggrin:

Very interesting that the London police were saying that the Uber drivers there were simply getting into to too many accidents. If I was a an insurance company executive I wouldn't even think of taking on a driver that does Uber part or full time.
 

Athos

Well-Known Member
Very interesting that the London police were saying that the Uber drivers there were simply getting into to too many accidents. If I was a an insurance company executive I wouldn't even think of taking on a driver that does Uber part or full time.

I used to employ quite a few people and without a doubt their after-hours lifestyle affected their work. If they were dopey because of anything from staying up late to drinking it cost me. Unlike Uber, I paid them an hourly wage and couldn't break times of poor performance out of their pay. They got paid the same and could come to work, put in their time and wouldn't really lose. I did though and I eventually got to viewing it as theft: theft of a mindfulness that I was paying them for.

Uber can operate with their piecework structure without the same kinds of losses and what they take, the attention, the mindfulness, the productivity, in a sense, comes from the driver's main daily employer. You could argue that it's not really theft, that a driver can do what she wants with her time but from a different angle it does look like the main employer is losing. Yes, you can name concepts with words and lock down the meaning that way if you want but that doesn't get to the subtly of what's really happening.
 

Karl Marx

Well-Known Member
I used to employ quite a few people and without a doubt their after-hours lifestyle affected their work. If they were dopey because of anything from staying up late to drinking it cost me. Unlike Uber, I paid them an hourly wage and couldn't break times of poor performance out of their pay. They got paid the same and could come to work, put in their time and wouldn't really lose. I did though and I eventually got to viewing it as theft: theft of a mindfulness that I was paying them for.

Uber can operate with their piecework structure without the same kinds of losses and what they take, the attention, the mindfulness, the productivity, in a sense, comes from the driver's main daily employer. You could argue that it's not really theft, that a driver can do what she wants with her time but from a different angle it does look like the main employer is losing. Yes, you can name concepts with words and lock down the meaning that way if you want but that doesn't get to the subtly of what's really happening.

I worked for a firm right out of college and the work contract I signed stated that I would not assume a part time job. Working in a intensive information occupation meant I had to be fully cognizant when talking to clients and coworkers. In the world where we face limited work opportunities it seems crazy that people are working 80 hours a week or more. With the considerable wealth these corporations have amassed it should be required that they behave responsibly. Part time workers should have their wages supplemented and if corporations have a unbalanced pay scale they should be taxed for this deliberate pay scale neglect. I was always struck by the number of millennial people I met that were working 3 jobs, and still barely making their expenses to simply exist.
 

Athos

Well-Known Member
...if corporations have a unbalanced pay scale they should be taxed for this deliberate pay scale neglect.

George Orwell thought that the pay gap should be no more that 10 times (or was it 8?) between the lowest and the highest paid in a company. The argument we are given is that a company needs to "pay for talent" but recent psychological studies show that there is an inflection point where more money yields worse performance. Not only does greed begin to take over but the big pay packets draw the psychopathicly greedy.

This concept of paying for talent is new. I don't remember any problem in the past where CEOs and managers didn't give their best for the pay they received even though it was a mere 10x the lowest workers. This whole pay for talent meme is phony.

I don't think Gordie Howe would have been a better hockey player with more money or Sydney Crosby worse with less. They are the same people working within the scales of their eras. The sports metaphor is apt because a fantastic and well paid player can make a difference and so sell the meme to us (we think in analogies) but even those big Pro employers put on salary caps and it is doubtful it affects the game outcomes.
 
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