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Why saying "OK, Boomer" at work can be age discrimination

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The phrase "OK, boomer" has become a catch-all put-down that Generation Zers and young millennials have been using to dismiss retrograde arguments made by baby boomers, the generation of Americans who are currently 55 to 73 years old.

Though it originated online and primarily is fueling memes, Twitter feuds and a flurry of commentary, it has begun migrating to real life.

As the term enters our everyday vocabulary, HR professionals and employment law specialists now face the age-old question: What happens if people start saying "OK, boomer" at work?

Evidence of discrimination

A lot of the internet fights over "OK, boomer" revolve around whether the phrase is offensive or not. But when you're talking about the workplace, offensiveness is not the primary problem. The bigger issue is that the insult is age-related.

Workers aged 40 and older are protected by a federal statute called the Age Discrimination in Employment Act, which prohibits harassment and discrimination on the basis of age.

Gen Xers protected, too

And it doesn't matter if the target isn't even a boomer.

Gen Xers were born around 1965 to 1979. That makes them older than 40 and covered by federal age discrimination law.

"Just a joke"? Good luck with that

One of the most famous age-discrimination cases — which made its way all the way up to the Supreme Court — involved a manager who described an employee as "so old he must have come over on the Mayflower."

Revenge of the "snowflakes"

To millennials who have suffered through years of being called "snowflakes" by their elders, protests of age discrimination can seem a bit rich.

Why didn't HR ban all those millennial jokes about avocado toast?

Tweet.PNG


The Age Discrimination in Employment Act only kicks in for workers who are 40 or older, which means millennials aren't covered. For now.

The oldest millennials will turn 40 later this year. So fear not, the millennial jokes may eventually become a legal problem for companies as these workers age.



Why older workers need protections

Boomers might seem really powerful, and yes, they might be your boss's boss's boss.

But older workers are more vulnerable than they seem. Older workers are expensive — by the time they've worked their way up the corporate ladder, their generous salaries start to weigh on the balance sheet.

And management may have trouble envisioning spectacular growth and innovative ideas from them years into the future, even if they are ready and willing to deliver.

That's why Congress thought it was important to extend protections to those workers. It wanted employers to treat them as individuals who shouldn't be dismissed out of hand because of their age.

And in many ways, that's what young people seem to want as well: a little respect for what they bring to the table. After all, that meme didn't make itself.

This article originally appeared in The Conversation.


 

i_k

Well-Known Member
What happened to respecting elders?

I’m seeing the phrase “OK, boomer” being thrown around so loosely, it’s disgusting. Now, because of its popular hashtag, it’s being used completely out of context and everyone is saying it like it’s going out of style. It’s somewhat similar to how the word “millennial” is used mostly to describe someone who’s lazy and entitled. Having been born in ‘81 I’m technically a millennial but I’m embarrassed to be known as one. It has only negative connotations.

As for the workplace, anyone who says “OK, boomer” should immediately receive a good old-fashioned five-across-the-eye from said boomer. That should fix things real quick.. :thumbup:
 

Jay Dean

Well-Known Member
Anyone over the age of 45 unless working for the state or in health care knows they can be out of a job at any second for a multitude of reasons, being goaded by comments would only be the older persons fault to take the bait lol. My buddies friend..in his 60s works at a corporation and when the owner goes, his sons take over. He knows that when they do they can hire two hot chicks from SMU or whatever for the same cost the current owner is paying him. Older people know the deal, they do not cry like current younger workers because A. they have thicker skin and B. they know they can be fired at any second for just one reason. Companies want to pay people the least amount possible for same quality of work and if someone making decent money that is older has a flare up, they (the boss's) only gain that nice bonus they been waiting for) Any elder that actually falls for the whole being offended trick at the job, is a moron and doesn't deserve the job anyways...

Don't worry, the same people making the comments are just around the corner from someone looking to snake their job also, once you pass 30..you are no longer a genius even if you do something genius.
 

i_k

Well-Known Member
Reading stuff like this just make me think when did the modern world become so thin skinned and soft.

Out of all the tireless millennials are lazy, whiny, participation trophy receivers people are getting mad and whiny about the term “Okay Boomer”? Smh
On top of being disrespectful, that type of language (snowflake; OK, boomer) only diminishes active discussions and prevents the progression of positive discourse or actions. It’s not about being thin-skinned, it’s about having real conversations without the age-discriminating, ad-hominem bs.

It’s true that some people just like to complain (based on their own inadequacies and the rise of social media which fuels it) but there are plenty of real issues that need awareness and it’s important for people to talk about them. The phrase at hand was initially used to show the older generation’s lack of empathy toward the problems faced by the younger generation. It was a bad idea. It has since grown out of context into something ugly. It needs to be nipped in the bud..
 

TheDevilisaParttimer

Well-Known Member
On top of being disrespectful, that type of language (snowflake; OK, boomer) only diminishes active discussions and prevents the progression of positive discourse or actions. It’s not about being thin-skinned, it’s about having real conversations without the age-discriminating, ad-hominem bs.

It’s true that some people just like to complain (based on their own inadequacies and the rise of social media which fuels it) but there are plenty of real issues that need awareness and it’s important for people to talk about them. The phrase at hand was initially used to show the older generation’s lack of empathy toward the problems faced by the younger generation. It was a bad idea. It has since grown out of context into something ugly. It needs to be nipped in the bud..
I’ve never used the term/quote but what’s so ugly about calling a baby boomer “a boomer”?

Sorry I’m not trying to be oblivious but this conversation is the first time of me even hearing of this at all.
 

Jay Dean

Well-Known Member
I’ve never used the term/quote but what’s so ugly about calling a baby boomer “a boomer”?
its a tactic to piss off older people so they get mad, so they can take their job and get a slight raise, everyone wins when the older person making over 100k gets mad. They fire them and let the younger people get 55 instead of 45. If wages made sense, nobody would even say such a thing in the workplace, it isn't about age or status, it is a chess game to get as much money as you can while you are there, and younger people know everyone benefits when the older people leave with their pay structure. Give it 10 years, there will be no well paying jobs, just @@@@@@@@ trying to get 30k lol

Except for healthcare or state/government jobs where insane amounts of money are pouring in and its easy to distribute without conflict.

If everyone actually listened to Andrew Yang about automation and how things are going with economics we would have him as the president. Arrogance is the stupidity of America.
 

TheDevilisaParttimer

Well-Known Member
its a tactic to piss off older people so they get mad, so they can take their job and get a slight raise, everyone wins when the older person making over 100k gets mad. They fire them and let the younger people get 55 instead of 45. If wages made sense, nobody would even say such a thing in the workplace, it isn't about age or status, it is a chess game to get as much money as you can while you are there, and younger people know everyone benefits when the older people leave with their pay structure. Give it 10 years, there will be no well paying jobs, just @@@@@@@@ trying to get 30k lol

Except for healthcare or state/government jobs where insane amounts of money are pouring in and its easy to distribute without conflict.
Jay there are tons of well paying jobs, the problem is everyone wants to sit at a desk and scratch their ass for a living.

Learn a skill and pay starts at 30k+ and goes up from there.
 

Jay Dean

Well-Known Member
Jay there are tons of well paying jobs, the problem is everyone wants to sit at a desk and scratch their ass for a living.

Learn a skill and pay starts at 30k+ and goes up from there.
Take a look at what people are getting to replace workers when people retire, then get back to me. All companies are trying to get the most out of anyone as they can, it is the new trend, your statement is old and once held true. Trust me, people are grateful for 50k these days as the pinnacle. 10 years from now, it will be rock bottom, unless major change happens.
 

GreatWhiteHope

Well-Known Member


The phrase "OK, boomer" has become a catch-all put-down that Generation Zers and young millennials have been using to dismiss retrograde arguments made by baby boomers, the generation of Americans who are currently 55 to 73 years old.

Though it originated online and primarily is fueling memes, Twitter feuds and a flurry of commentary, it has begun migrating to real life.

As the term enters our everyday vocabulary, HR professionals and employment law specialists now face the age-old question: What happens if people start saying "OK, boomer" at work?

Evidence of discrimination

A lot of the internet fights over "OK, boomer" revolve around whether the phrase is offensive or not. But when you're talking about the workplace, offensiveness is not the primary problem. The bigger issue is that the insult is age-related.

Workers aged 40 and older are protected by a federal statute called the Age Discrimination in Employment Act, which prohibits harassment and discrimination on the basis of age.

Gen Xers protected, too

And it doesn't matter if the target isn't even a boomer.

Gen Xers were born around 1965 to 1979. That makes them older than 40 and covered by federal age discrimination law.

"Just a joke"? Good luck with that

One of the most famous age-discrimination cases — which made its way all the way up to the Supreme Court — involved a manager who described an employee as "so old he must have come over on the Mayflower."

Revenge of the "snowflakes"

To millennials who have suffered through years of being called "snowflakes" by their elders, protests of age discrimination can seem a bit rich.

Why didn't HR ban all those millennial jokes about avocado toast?

View attachment 384229

The Age Discrimination in Employment Act only kicks in for workers who are 40 or older, which means millennials aren't covered. For now.

The oldest millennials will turn 40 later this year. So fear not, the millennial jokes may eventually become a legal problem for companies as these workers age.



Why older workers need protections

Boomers might seem really powerful, and yes, they might be your boss's boss's boss.

But older workers are more vulnerable than they seem. Older workers are expensive — by the time they've worked their way up the corporate ladder, their generous salaries start to weigh on the balance sheet.

And management may have trouble envisioning spectacular growth and innovative ideas from them years into the future, even if they are ready and willing to deliver.

That's why Congress thought it was important to extend protections to those workers. It wanted employers to treat them as individuals who shouldn't be dismissed out of hand because of their age.

And in many ways, that's what young people seem to want as well: a little respect for what they bring to the table. After all, that meme didn't make itself.

This article originally appeared in The Conversation.







This is ridiculous but we already live in a ridiculous world so ok
Post automatically merged:

Take a look at what people are getting to replace workers when people retire, then get back to me. All companies are trying to get the most out of anyone as they can, it is the new trend, your statement is old and once held true. Trust me, people are grateful for 50k these days as the pinnacle. 10 years from now, it will be rock bottom, unless major change happens.
50k is a mediocre starting point

Not the pinnacle dude
 

Jay Dean

Well-Known Member
Jay there are tons of well paying jobs, the problem is everyone wants to sit at a desk and scratch their ass for a living.

Learn a skill and pay starts at 30k+ and goes up from there.
as for anyone actually "working" well sure that pays 30k starting, but nobody is going to do that...they want everything Netflix fast...lol

I worked with this dude that went to school to be an auto mechanic, I was like cool..he was about 20, I said you can make great money now, can you get your knuckles bloody? he didn't have an answer..I was like dude that is why it pays well. Sure enough he dropped out after his internship at a shop. These people can't get out of tablet world to actually do "trades" they are too comfy..not only that have no idea that you have to actually "work" to make money.
 

TheDevilisaParttimer

Well-Known Member
Take a look at what people are getting to replace workers when people retire, then get back to me. All companies are trying to get the most out of anyone as they can, it is the new trend, your statement is old and once held true. Trust me, people are grateful for 50k these days as the pinnacle. 10 years from now, it will be rock bottom, unless major change happens.
Do you think diesel mechanics are jumping up and down, standing in line for 50k/year?
 

tohunt4me

Well-Known Member
Thats w


The phrase "OK, boomer" has become a catch-all put-down that Generation Zers and young millennials have been using to dismiss retrograde arguments made by baby boomers, the generation of Americans who are currently 55 to 73 years old.

Though it originated online and primarily is fueling memes, Twitter feuds and a flurry of commentary, it has begun migrating to real life.

As the term enters our everyday vocabulary, HR professionals and employment law specialists now face the age-old question: What happens if people start saying "OK, boomer" at work?

Evidence of discrimination

A lot of the internet fights over "OK, boomer" revolve around whether the phrase is offensive or not. But when you're talking about the workplace, offensiveness is not the primary problem. The bigger issue is that the insult is age-related.

Workers aged 40 and older are protected by a federal statute called the Age Discrimination in Employment Act, which prohibits harassment and discrimination on the basis of age.

Gen Xers protected, too

And it doesn't matter if the target isn't even a boomer.

Gen Xers were born around 1965 to 1979. That makes them older than 40 and covered by federal age discrimination law.

"Just a joke"? Good luck with that

One of the most famous age-discrimination cases — which made its way all the way up to the Supreme Court — involved a manager who described an employee as "so old he must have come over on the Mayflower."

Revenge of the "snowflakes"

To millennials who have suffered through years of being called "snowflakes" by their elders, protests of age discrimination can seem a bit rich.

Why didn't HR ban all those millennial jokes about avocado toast?

View attachment 384229

The Age Discrimination in Employment Act only kicks in for workers who are 40 or older, which means millennials aren't covered. For now.

The oldest millennials will turn 40 later this year. So fear not, the millennial jokes may eventually become a legal problem for companies as these workers age.



Why older workers need protections

Boomers might seem really powerful, and yes, they might be your boss's boss's boss.

But older workers are more vulnerable than they seem. Older workers are expensive — by the time they've worked their way up the corporate ladder, their generous salaries start to weigh on the balance sheet.

And management may have trouble envisioning spectacular growth and innovative ideas from them years into the future, even if they are ready and willing to deliver.

That's why Congress thought it was important to extend protections to those workers. It wanted employers to treat them as individuals who shouldn't be dismissed out of hand because of their age.

And in many ways, that's what young people seem to want as well: a little respect for what they bring to the table. After all, that meme didn't make itself.

This article originally appeared in The Conversation.


Thats why they let the " Old Timers" out of prison .
Same reason.

To AVOID MEDICAL EXPENSES !
 

Jay Dean

Well-Known Member
This is ridiculous but we already live in a ridiculous world so ok
Post automatically merged:



50k is a mediocre starting point

Not the pinnacle dude
It is when someone will do the same quality of work, look at the tech world, people are all making about 50k when they would be making more. Everyone is in debt, companies are getting richer and workers are "just getting by" ...give it 10 years..the jobs that are left if automation hasn't taken over will be so sought after they will be 50k at max in a world of inflation from where we are now at at least 40% lol
 

GreatWhiteHope

Well-Known Member
On top of being disrespectful, that type of language (snowflake; OK, boomer) only diminishes active discussions and prevents the progression of positive discourse or actions. It’s not about being thin-skinned, it’s about having real conversations without the age-discriminating, ad-hominem bs.

It’s true that some people just like to complain (based on their own inadequacies and the rise of social media which fuels it) but there are plenty of real issues that need awareness and it’s important for people to talk about them. The phrase at hand was initially used to show the older generation’s lack of empathy toward the problems faced by the younger generation. It was a bad idea. It has since grown out of context into something ugly. It needs to be nipped in the bud..


On top of me already not caring at all
I like the idea of ok boomer


You know it’s basically a response from millennials to old ppl because they love shitting on millennials?


it’s basically a go love yourself 🤙
 
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TheDevilisaParttimer

Well-Known Member
as for anyone actually "working" well sure that pays 30k starting, but nobody is going to do that...they want everything Netflix fast...lol

I worked with this dude that went to school to be an auto mechanic, I was like cool..he was about 20, I said you can make great money now, can you get your knuckles bloody? he didn't have an answer..I was like dude that is why it pays well. Sure enough he dropped out after his internship at a shop. These people can't get out of tablet world to actually do "trades" they are too comfy..not only that have no idea that you have to actually "work" to make money.
Jay we can’t help people that don’t wanna work
 

Jay Dean

Well-Known Member
Do you think diesel mechanics are jumping up and down, standing in line for 50k/year?
Nobody is taking those jobs, same with working on powerlines...nobody wants to because they grew up with tablets and netflix...being a diesel mechanic requires YEARS of skill and hard work, that is not going to happen unless that person is a complete redneck from alabama or wherever with no other options, just sayin....so you are talking 5 out of 300 million entitled people that want to sit at a desk and click lol
 

TheDevilisaParttimer

Well-Known Member
Nobody is taking those jobs, same with working on powerlines...nobody wants to because they grew up with tablets and netflix...being a diesel mechanic requires YEARS of skill and hard work, that is not going to happen unless that person is a complete redneck from alabama or wherever with no other options, just sayin....so you are talking 5 out of 300 million entitled people that want to sit at a desk and click lol
Nah I’m seeing a segment of my generation, me included (millennials) starting to take up those blue collar but high paying jobs.

All these “administration assistants” :rollseyes: will just be at $13/hour to the end of time.

If you’re gonna go white collar it has to be highly skilled and/or Ivy League.
 
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