Why is canadian Uber reporting mileage in miles?

Campark

Active Member
Can we do away with the miles? Its not how we think or talk about distance.

Just irks me to see american ways in canada.
 

Token44

Well-Known Member
Can we do away with the miles? Its not how we think or talk about distance.

Just irks me to see american ways in canada.
It's not actually UBER. Mine are all reported in kms. Let me guess... You're using an Android phone.
Like babaganoosh said. Change to English Australia, and it'll all change to kms.

So it's actually Google not having an "English - Canada" setting that's messing with the units displayed.
 

Campark

Active Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #4
I see it on the report. Weekly report. Pretty sure its uber. Ubers not even american.

Canadians hate miles... well i know i do...
 

Campark

Active Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #10
Lol guess im an idiot. A pax told me it was a german comp and i believed them.

So ubers american? Go figure... dont change anything anyway..

So its Canada not getting its own language settings which is pathetic.
 

renbutler

Well-Known Member
Uber IS American. The only reason you see a dutch address is because they found a clever way to pay less taxes.
It's not that clever. Having the largest corporate tax in the world has driven many HQs out of the US.

And some people want to raise it even higher!
 

Livan

Well-Known Member
It's not that clever. Having the largest corporate tax in the world has driven many HQs out of the US.

And some people want to raise it even higher!
It's actually clever... Read this article.
http://fortune.com/2015/10/22/uber-tax-shell/

The strategy begins with Uber International C.V., the subsidiary that Uber created in May 2013. Uber International C.V. has no employees and, though it is chartered in the Netherlands, lists the address of a law firm in Bermuda as its headquarters. It sits atop Uber’s network of subsidiaries outside the U.S.  The C.V. at the end of the name stands for commanditaire vennootschap, which is essentially a Dutch version of a partnership....
 

renbutler

Well-Known Member
Okay, clever maybe, but not original:

Outside the U.S., the company’s network of subsidiaries has been carefully pieced together to create a state-of-the-art structure for minimizing taxes. The strategies that it employs are legal and similar to those of bigger tech names such as Apple, Google, and Facebook, not to mention multi-national companies such as Starbucks SBUX 0.14% and GE GE -0.13% . “Silicon Valley is a small place,” says Ed Kleinbard, a professor of law and business at the University of Southern California who previously served as the chief of staff of the U.S. Congress’s Joint Committee on Taxation. “Just as there is a vibrant atmosphere for tech innovation, there is a vibrant climate for sharing tax innovation.”

My point is that companies do this to escape the USA's stifling corporate taxes. Like it or not, and nobody is asking for sympathy for mega-corporations, there is a valid reason why they do this, and it hurts our country.

Some people would prefer that they pay 0% US taxes by setting up overseas than pay a reasonable rate and staying here. Ideology is ruining our country.
 
Top