Why doesn't word of mouth stop new people from becoming an Uber Partner?

Sal29

Well-Known Member
Word of mouth can be very damaging.
Plasma Televisions are an example of a superior product vs LCD and LED TVs that was destroyed by word of mouth.
Earlier Plasmas were susceptible to image retention and pixel burn in.
Eventually pixel orbitter, pixel shifter, white wash and other technologies were introduced to reduce the risk of pixel burn in.
It was too late though because every TV buyers had heard from a friend, relative, etc about how Plasmas get burned in and that you should never buy one and that they create heat, have screen glare in sunny rooms, dimmer in sunny rooms, use more electricity, are heavy, etc.
The fact that Plasma Tvs like the legendary Pioneer Kuro Elite, Panasonic ZT60, and Samsung 8500 had far better picture quality than any 1080P LCD or LED television ever made(because of superior black levels, lack of motion blur, more accurate colors, and uniform brightness from pixel to pixel)according to all the experts, videophiles, and Best Buy salesmen was not enough to overcome the word of mouth of the TV buyers.
Basically, why isn't word of mouth that Uber is a scam and that Uber partners are lucky to make minimum wage after expenses not stopping new drivers from joining Uber?
BTW, Plasma TVs were eventually surpassed by 4k OLED Tvs by LG and Panasonic(available in Europe only).
 

I_Like_Spam

Well-Known Member
Basically, why isn't word of mouth that Uber is a scam and that Uber partners are lucky to make minimum wage after expenses not stopping new drivers from joining Uber?

It could be, if there was actually a decent amount of word of mouth.

But the facts are that a lot of partners quit pretty quickly when they see how little they are making, and attribute it to the idea they just don't have the right stuff instead of problems with the system. Others haven't been around long enough to actually see how ubering is reducing the value of their rides and don't realize how little they are making. And of course, its human nature not to admit your mistakes.
 

andaas

Well-Known Member
Moderator
The nail in the coffin for plasma TV's were the LED (backlit) LCD TV's. Many people had been hearing the buzz about OLED, and then all of these "LED" TV's come out - the consumers thought they were buying the next big thing - all they were buying was a new light source.

I love my Panasonic plasma, and it will be replaced with an OLED someday (but no rush because it still looks and works perfectly).
 

gofry

Well-Known Member
And of course, its human nature not to admit your mistakes.
Interesting question. I agree with I_Like_Spam. People like to brag about their successes (like bragging about what a good deal they got on something) but few of us want to admit a stupid decision or poor performance. In fact, I think simply admitting that you drove for Uber is kind of degrading in and of itself.

For now, Uber's slick advertising and hip brand trumps the disgruntled gossip.
 

andaas

Well-Known Member
Moderator
For now, Uber's slick advertising and hip brand trumps the disgruntled gossip.
Uber has a very good PR machine that emphasizes the (supposed) benefits of the service, of drivers "turning on the app and earning $400", creating jobs, etc. Most new drivers only see the positive and don't research the potential negative before starting, not to mention, much of the driver advertising targets lower income demographics, who also may not pay attention to the "bad" reports.

The same PR machine spins Uber's oversaturation of drivers as "creating jobs for people" and "fixing the traffic problem by removing cars from the road". However, as reports are starting to show, Uber is simply replacing their customer's cars with UberX cars... "ridesharing" only occurs in the handful of markets that have UberPool - and the majority of drivers hate taking those rides.
 

tb1984

Active Member
Word of mouth can be very damaging.
Plasma Televisions are an example of a superior product vs LCD and LED TVs that was destroyed by word of mouth.
Earlier Plasmas were susceptible to image retention and pixel burn in.
Eventually pixel orbitter, pixel shifter, white wash and other technologies were introduced to reduce the risk of pixel burn in.
It was too late though because every TV buyers had heard from a friend, relative, etc about how Plasmas get burned in and that you should never buy one and that they create heat, have screen glare in sunny rooms, dimmer in sunny rooms, use more electricity, are heavy, etc.
The fact that Plasma Tvs like the legendary Pioneer Kuro Elite, Panasonic ZT60, and Samsung 8500 had far better picture quality than any 1080P LCD or LED television ever made(because of superior black levels, lack of motion blur, more accurate colors, and uniform brightness from pixel to pixel)according to all the experts, videophiles, and Best Buy salesmen was not enough to overcome the word of mouth of the TV buyers.
Basically, why isn't word of mouth that Uber is a scam and that Uber partners are lucky to make minimum wage after expenses not stopping new drivers from joining Uber?
BTW, Plasma TVs were eventually surpassed by 4k OLED Tvs by LG and Panasonic(available in Europe only).
Have you heard of free money? Free money can get people to do anything, I mean literally anything. That's what Uber does, give money for referrals, bonus for completing first 50 rides...
 

agtg

Well-Known Member
If you do a youtube search for Uber, you will come up with a bunch of viral marketing videos of people pretending to make a ton of cash for Uber. That's the word of mouth they believe because they aren't doing the research.
 

tohunt4me

Well-Known Member
Interesting question. I agree with I_Like_Spam. People like to brag about their successes (like bragging about what a good deal they got on something) but few of us want to admit a stupid decision or poor performance. In fact, I think simply admitting that you drove for Uber is kind of degrading in and of itself.

For now, Uber's slick advertising and hip brand trumps the disgruntled gossip.
Well known phenomenon.
Even happen to have a ' meme' for it.
 

Attachments

Ubernic

Well-Known Member
I think the problem is, not everyone has the same story. People in good markets who drive intelligently make plenty of money. Other people sit all day and drive non surge hours barely making ends meet, others go bust. There isn't much guidance with Uber, you just turn on the app and go at your own discretion. Personally I am profiting from Uber, and I greatly enjoy it, so I continue to do it. I know other people who stopped because there just wasn't enough surge to make it worth it for them. Uber isn't a "scam", some of you guys get way too extreme with all this.

It's like saying "construction is a scam", no, it isn't, but "thousands of construction workers go out of work and barely make ends meet yet they advertsie $20/hr on their want ads". Well, yea, because when business is good, construction workers make bank, but when there is no work, the economy gets bad, new developments dry up in certain regions, the work dissipates and those same contractors now make very little or nothing at all. I think the main thing here, is you guys don't get that this is the life of a independent contractor, you signed up to be one, that's what Uber is. I know there are blurry areas where Uber wants us to behave like emplpyess but not call us employees, but at the end of the day, we are still independent contractors, and it is up to us to make our own money. If we can't make money, we either move markets or change jobs, that's just how it is.
 

Tequila Jake

Well-Known Member
One of the problems is too many people consider celebrity advertising as word of mouth. A celebrity getting paid to read a commercial obviously knows more than your next door neighbor who actually drove for a couple of months.

I think another aspect is most people who drive aren't that unhappy. They're not looking to make a living at it. They're happy making a few hundred bucks a month working part time. Rideshare IS a great gig if that's your goal. It is a great gig if you just want some fun money for a vacation on the side.

One of the reasons is that for these short-term goals, you don't have to be as careful of the long-term expenses. You fill up with gasoline, change the oil every so often, and probably quit before the tires wear out.

If you want to make a business profit and save money over the long term, it's not great but it's not too bad either. If you want to make a living as your primary occupation, you have to work really hard at it to be successful, but I'm sure it's possible.
 

tohunt4me

Well-Known Member
I think the problem is, not everyone has the same story. People in good markets who drive intelligently make plenty of money. Other people sit all day and drive non surge hours barely making ends meet, others go bust. There isn't much guidance with Uber, you just turn on the app and go at your own discretion. Personally I am profiting from Uber, and I greatly enjoy it, so I continue to do it. I know other people who stopped because there just wasn't enough surge to make it worth it for them. Uber isn't a "scam", some of you guys get way too extreme with all this.

It's like saying "construction is a scam", no, it isn't, but "thousands of construction workers go out of work and barely make ends meet yet they advertsie $20/hr on their want ads". Well, yea, because when business is good, construction workers make bank, but when there is no work, the economy gets bad, new developments dry up in certain regions, the work dissipates and those same contractors now make very little or nothing at all. I think the main thing here, is you guys don't get that this is the life of a independent contractor, you signed up to be one, that's what Uber is. I know there are blurry areas where Uber wants us to behave like emplpyess but not call us employees, but at the end of the day, we are still independent contractors, and it is up to us to make our own money. If we can't make money, we either move markets or change jobs, that's just how it is.
Stick around.
Uber will flood your market by onboarding of drivers.

They need the sustainability data via this experimentation with your profits.

So they know how many Robot cars they should dispatch when you are rendered obsolete.
 

SEAL Team 5

Well-Known Member
Word of mouth can be very damaging.
Plasma Televisions are an example of a superior product vs LCD and LED TVs that was destroyed by word of mouth.
Earlier Plasmas were susceptible to image retention and pixel burn in.
Eventually pixel orbitter, pixel shifter, white wash and other technologies were introduced to reduce the risk of pixel burn in.
It was too late though because every TV buyers had heard from a friend, relative, etc about how Plasmas get burned in and that you should never buy one and that they create heat, have screen glare in sunny rooms, dimmer in sunny rooms, use more electricity, are heavy, etc.
The fact that Plasma Tvs like the legendary Pioneer Kuro Elite, Panasonic ZT60, and Samsung 8500 had far better picture quality than any 1080P LCD or LED television ever made(because of superior black levels, lack of motion blur, more accurate colors, and uniform brightness from pixel to pixel)according to all the experts, videophiles, and Best Buy salesmen was not enough to overcome the word of mouth of the TV buyers.
Basically, why isn't word of mouth that Uber is a scam and that Uber partners are lucky to make minimum wage after expenses not stopping new drivers from joining Uber?
BTW, Plasma TVs were eventually surpassed by 4k OLED Tvs by LG and Panasonic(available in Europe only).
Because of the theory you can tell a kid a thousand times it's very hot, but they still touch it. I personally call it "the kick me dog syndrome". You keep kicking that little yapping mutt away from you, but the dog keeps coming back for more. It's human nature that people have to learn things the hard way. And sometimes a very hard way when your driving for Uber involves insurance claims and traffic citations.
 

Tombstone

New Member
I do fairly well driving for uber part time. I only drive Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights. I drive a $3000 dollar Toyota Yaris. Driving doesn't cost me anything, it's almost all profit. I have the same insurance I had before, the value of the car isn't going down much as it's at it's bottom already. I make $100 bucks in 3 or 4 hours and I'm happy.
 

shiftydrake

Well-Known Member
Hope you don't get into accident.......and get charged with insurance fraud..........driving commercially and not having commercial insurance...........insurance company drops you and everybody comes after you.......good luck
 

madbrain

New Member
Word of mouth can be very damaging.
Plasma Televisions are an example of a superior product vs LCD and LED TVs that was destroyed by word of mouth.
It is not only the word of mouth that killed Plamas - there were other reasons, such as the fact that they are terribly power inefficient. A large plasma can double as a heater. They may indeed have had better picture, but they were an evolutionary step, IMO.

Not sure the analogy works with Uber - almost everyone buys a TV at some point, but only a small minority will ever consider driving. As long as Uber gets funded by VCs and continues to pay referrals to new drivers, I suspect they won't care about their bad reputation. Eventually, their churn will exceed their new signups, and I suspect their funding will vanish.
 

Illinoisdriver

New Member
Word of mouth can be very damaging.
Plasma Televisions are an example of a superior product vs LCD and LED TVs that was destroyed by word of mouth.
Earlier Plasmas were susceptible to image retention and pixel burn in.
Eventually pixel orbitter, pixel shifter, white wash and other technologies were introduced to reduce the risk of pixel burn in.
It was too late though because every TV buyers had heard from a friend, relative, etc about how Plasmas get burned in and that you should never buy one and that they create heat, have screen glare in sunny rooms, dimmer in sunny rooms, use more electricity, are heavy, etc.
The fact that Plasma Tvs like the legendary Pioneer Kuro Elite, Panasonic ZT60, and Samsung 8500 had far better picture quality than any 1080P LCD or LED television ever made(because of superior black levels, lack of motion blur, more accurate colors, and uniform brightness from pixel to pixel)according to all the experts, videophiles, and Best Buy salesmen was not enough to overcome the word of mouth of the TV buyers.
Basically, why isn't word of mouth that Uber is a scam and that Uber partners are lucky to make minimum wage after expenses not stopping new drivers from joining Uber?
BTW, Plasma TVs were eventually surpassed by 4k OLED Tvs by LG and Panasonic(available in Europe only).
Bottom line Uber still attracts even with all the negatives because people are desperate for money. It's easy to sign up, no skills, no training, have a car
and a license and go to work. Really it's all people have left for a choice and we all know plenty fail early but you basically just walk away and do something else. I personally see the opportunity as very limited in earnings potential except in a very few places where volume and surge fee's are typical. Seems anyone earning standard fares are not surviving and those who seek out and have more surge fares at least have a viable chance to earn not loose money. It all depends too on your expenses, personal and otherwise. A college kid living in a dorm or a group apartment with minimal expenses might see a Uber driver position as enough to make a little money. Hours are flexible, have a car and license and maybe it's better than pizza delivery. On the other hand probably less attractive with a big SUV, a mortgage, kids, and other bills. Not the career move that wouldn't require a lot of effort to earn enough.
 
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