Who wins who loses?

Sandhills

Well-Known Member
With the strike and IPO just wondering when the dust settles who are going to be the winners and losers ?

Am thinking it hasn't been good for uber ...for a few reasons

Bad press world wide hurts brand
and tends to attract government attention

Drivers realising they are not alone...same problems with pay and behaviour are being reported world wide

Social media is empowering drivers and works against ubers interests to keep isolated

Thoughts ?
 

Sandhills

Well-Known Member
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Uber drivers have massed outside the company's Melbourne headquarters, part of a global protest against the ride-sharing giant.

Key points:
Drivers say they are struggling to make the minimum wage and earning money is becoming increasingly hard
They also say they feel powerless and are fearful of complaining due to the possibility of losing work
Victorian Treasurer Tim Pallas has flagged possible action against tech companies dominating the on-demand economy
The noisy meeting
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Sandhills

Well-Known Member
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Daniel Ives, an analyst at Wedbush Securities, said Uber's rideshare "take rate" increased slightly to 21.7 per cent in 2018 but that this will remain a hot point of contention for Uber.

"We do see added risk from Uber aiming to take a greater share of the fare from drivers and expect that the more Uber pushes here, the more drivers will fight back and protest, increasing the likelihood of regulations (particularly at the state level in the US and in Europe) of minimum wage guarantees," Ives said in a research note.

Uber said in a statement: "Drivers are at the heart of our service - we can't succeed without them - and thousands of people come into work at Uber every day focused on how to make their experience better, on and off the road."
 

Maddo

Well-Known Member
Daniel Ives, an analyst at Wedbush Securities, said Uber's rideshare "take rate" increased slightly to 21.7 per cent in 2018 but that this will remain a hot point of contention for Uber.

"We do see added risk from Uber aiming to take a greater share of the fare from drivers and expect that the more Uber pushes here, the more drivers will fight back and protest, increasing the likelihood of regulations (particularly at the state level in the US and in Europe) of minimum wage guarantees," Ives said in a research note.

Uber said in a statement: "Drivers are at the heart of our service - we can't succeed without them - and thousands of people come into work at Uber every day focused on how to make their experience better, on and off the road."
Some really good points here Mr S. Rumblings need, of course, to manifest into action. There was some comments made by Labour late last year re gig economy workers but this seems to have petered out in the run up to the election. Obviously we are not high on the agenda politically at this stage. I think the status quo will pretty much remain as is in the short term but maybe in about 12 months drivers in Australia will be squeezed to such an extent that ubering as a main gig will become unrealistic and untenable. Time, perhaps, to contemplate an exit strategy.
 

UberTopGun

Well-Known Member
It was amazing how everyone - well known Journalists; Politicians; Ex Politicians; Professional Statisticians; Tv Hosts -
They all got it wrong!
Even the Tv TeleType at 6pm said Labor would win.
 

WestSydGuy

Well-Known Member
It's the Bill we couldn't afford!

I’m amazed that there is no law requiring any thing a political party prints be factual in nature. All of these “TAXES” are in fact fake, but to the casual observer (most voters) it seems legit.

From an Uber drivers point of view, we can expect lower incomes over time, with slightly lower tax rates, woohoo! :poop::rolleyes::confusion:

Remember, if you earn less money, you’ll pay less tax :o-o:
 

DurrrrrHurrrrr

Active Member
There was some comments made by Labour late last year re gig economy workers but this seems to have petered out in the run up to the election. Obviously we are not high on the agenda politically at this stage.
Gig economy thrives on low end low education level immigrants. The most desperate and most easily exploited (also some of the best work ethics). It really is the group that labour used to help, now since siding with the greens this group is not really on the radar for labour. Greens are happy to create a class divide between the educated and non educated so no help there, liberal is happy to see the gig economy thrive as it helps keep wage growth under control and in many cases keeps people off social security.

Also the gig economy is making it so much cheaper and more convenient for those that want to spend money getting someone to do things for them that they would otherwise do for themselves, would be a brave government to introduce policy that may result in higher costs to the consumers.
 
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