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Who was your most memorable rider?

ANTlifebaby

Well-Known Member
I've had so many memorable riders, but one regular I have is a woman in her late 20s who I take to the local community college where she is getting her G.E.D. She was a gangbanger, drop-out, slinging drugs, definitely some violence in there, lots of talk about guns and domestic drama, and she overdosed and ended up in a coma for a few weeks when she was 17. She miscarried during the coma. They never thought she'd come out, but she did some months later. She has a major speech impediment and speaks in a very halting sort of way, but she is smart as a whip, and quite wise for someone her age--I wish she would have had some of that wisdom when she is younger, and perhaps that's why we connect. She walks with a cane and a brace on one leg, and struggles on the ice in the winter. She asks me to walk her to the door of her building as its about 50 meters away, which I do, and I just admire how hard she is working to put her life back together after spending the last 6 years paying back on bad decisions.

I've definitely had way more interesting stories, but she's the one that pops into my head after all these rides.
 

Merc7186

Well-Known Member
Cougar.....intoxicated....mad that her female friend wouldnt let her do the dirty with her that night.....took out her frustrations on...um, herself.

Gave me $38 cash and walked out of my car completely naked, using her clothes to cover her augments breasts as she walked into her house.
 

SFOspeedracer

Well-Known Member
I just did a search to see if I can find a story on this incredible young lady. Sure enough I found it. Here's her story.



Holly Crabtree is shown in Iraq just before the mission in which a sniper shot her in the head. Holly Crabtree Collection
Sequim veteran, nearly killed in Iraq, works against the odds and toward a college degree [Gallery]
Four years after being shot in the head while serving with the Navy in Iraq, a Port Angeles High School graduate isn’t going to let a sniper’s bullet stop her from achieving her goals.

Retired Navy Chief Petty Officer Holly Crabtree, 34, now lives in Sequim with her uncle, Chuck Engel, and is a single mother to her daughter, Leah Crabtree, 9.

But in the spring of 2010, Crabtree had plans for a full Navy career and was assigned to a combined special operations forces unit as a Navy corpsman and Arabic translator in Iraq when she was targeted by a sniper.


Crabtree was shot in the head during a joint Navy SEAL/Army Special Forces operation in Iraq, a nearly fatal wound that earned her the Purple Heart.

“I don’t regret anything that happened. I love the Navy. I love my job,” she said.

Crabtree was awarded the Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal four times during her 14 years in the Navy.

Today, Crabtree walks with a cane, is legally blind and has difficulty with her memory.

She retired from the Navy to Sequim in 2012, but she’s certainly not taking it easy as she continues to pursue her goals.


Crabtree takes online classes through Trident University International as she works toward a bachelor’s degree in environmental health that she expects to receive in 2016.

She eventually wants to earn a master’s degree that would allow her to work with injured veterans.

“I’d like to work for the Veterans Administration in Seattle or Oregon,” she said.

Crabtree achieved much during her career in the military and even more in recovering from her injuries.

But she said that if people meet her and know her story, she asks that they don’t thank her for her service.

“This is our job,” she said, and added that she is not comfortable with being thanked for 14 years of doing exactly what she wanted to do.

Her brother, Jason Engel, lives in Port Angeles, and her sister, Sgt. First Class Sarah Whatley, is serving with the Army in air traffic control at Fort Hood, Texas.

Crabtree enlisted in the Navy in 1997 as a junior at Port Angeles High School and participated in the Delayed Entry Program until her graduation in 1998.

The Navy trained Crabtree as a hospital corpsman — a job that can range from serving as a pharmacy technician to entering the field of combat serving as combat medical support for the Marine Corps, SEALs or Army Special Forces.


She earned the title of “independent duty corpsman” — the highest level of enlisted medical certification in the Navy.

These are typically assigned to the Marine Corps or ships or submarines that are too small to have their own doctor.

Once she completed that schooling, Crabtree was assigned to the Expeditionary Warfare School, which trains corpsmen and other specialists to work with special operations forces teams, and she earned a Navy Expeditionary Warfare qualification.

She also learned Arabic and was assigned to a mixed Army and Navy special operations forces unit in Iraq.

Although women were technically not assigned to combat units — and no woman has ever qualified for the Navy’s elite special operations unit — women are often attached to such units as “individual augmentees” to provide medical and other support services to soldiers and sailors and to be able to interact with Muslim women.

In addition to her duties in caring for the members of her unit, Crabtree was assigned a female partner from an Army psychological operations unit, and the two were sent to villages to trade medical treatment for information about enemy activity in the area.

“When we walked into a village, they would know I was medical because I had the big pack,” she said.

It was during one such trip, on April 15, 2010 near Ramadi in Iraq’s Anbar Province, that Crabtree was struck in the head by a sniper’s bullet, which she said hit her in the rear, left side of her head and came to rest behind her left eye.

She said she remembers being hit and her team taking care of her.

“I remember waking up in the Humvee,” she said.

When she reached the field hospital, her case was classified as “Hope Trauma,” which means there is little hope for recovery.

She went through a six-hour surgery at the field hospital, which she wasn’t expected to survive.

Against the odds, she survived and was stabilized and evacuated from Iraq to Bethesda Naval Hospital in Maryland.

After about three months, Crabtree became fully aware of her surroundings and began recovering from the devastating injury.

In 2011, she was transferred back to her unit’s home base at MacDill Air Force Base in Florida for physical rehabilitation and discharge from the Navy.

The Navy told Crabtree that she would be given a medical retirement.

“I wanted to stay. They told me I would retire as a first class [petty officer],” Crabtree said.

She had relearned how to walk with the assistance of a cane, but her right arm and vision have not recovered to the same degree.

“It cut my vision in half,” she said.

The likelihood of returning to a level of health that would allow her to resume duty as a corpsman was less than what the Navy required, but Crabtree said she was not ready to give up on the Navy.



While waiting for her retirement paperwork to be completed, Crabtree, then a first class petty officer, she said she discovered that she was eligible to take the Navy’s exam for promotion to chief petty officer.

Since her eyesight had not returned enough to read, the Navy allowed a chief who had already passed his exam to read it to her.

She passed the exam and was promoted to chief hospital corpsman in 2011.

In 2012, with her daughter, she was flown to Naval Hospital Bremerton, where she was retired with honors in a large ceremony attended by Medal of Honor recipient Master Sgt. Leroy Petry, whom Crabtree described as “a close friend.”

Petry, who works with injured veterans in the Tacoma area, has been an inspiration to her, Crabtree said.

“I want to do what he does,” she said.
I remember only briefly hearing of what happened to this young woman. Op Iraqi freedom was the hardest thing to be in the middle of, those were the longest and darkest days of my career
 

EphLux

Well-Known Member
I drove a lady and her daughter to walmart. She was telling me how much easier uber has made her life. Before uber, taxi was too expensive and she use to walk everywhere. Even 1.5 miles to the hospital. This really broke my heart.
Ubering instead of walking will break HER heart. Before she was thin and in good cardio shape. She's gained 30 lbs and can't climb a set of stairs since Uber.
Post automatically merged:

most memorable ride: An old guy who "tipped" me $35 in cash only to take it back when I told him the ride automatically comes out of his credit card. lol
Post automatically merged:

I was driving a cab in San Francisco in the late 70's, early 80's.
I drove Thurs, Fri, Sat, Sun from 6pm to 6am.

This was Friday morning at about 3am.
I picked up a flag in the Loin.
Hispanic male about my age (25ish).
He got in, I asked where we going ... he showed me a .38 snub and said, "Just drive."
@@@@.
I drove. Told him I had the till in my shirt pocket. He said to just drive and gave me directions that was taking me down to the piers. Not good.
Its funny how time slows to a crawl.
I'm thinking how the hell I'm going to get out of this. The more I thought about it, the more angry I became. I'm thinking "Ya know, I am out here busting my ass to make a living and this mug is going to ... what ... KILL me for a few bucks? Screw that."
I came to the conclusion that he was going to shoot me, and that I was not going to go like that. I was pissed. Really enraged ... quietly. Time slowed some more.
We drove. I offered money again, and was told to shut up.

I don't know when I decided or if I ever did ... but when the spot was right I sped up to about 40 mph. Then 45 mph. I was hoping to attract attention of a cop. He told me to slow down.
At almost the same moment that he said 'slow down', I jerked the wheel to the left and took a telephone pole right in middle of the car.
He was not wearing a seat belt ... yup, he ended up on the hood of the car.

I woke up in ER.
Cop about an inch from my broken nose yelling questions (who's gun? did you crash on purpose? do you know the guy? why didn't you radio in that you had a fare?) - the nurse yelling at him to back off. I tried to answer a couple of questions but I was so swollen he couldn't understand me (prolly just as well).

Bad guy was hurt pretty bad, ended up paralyzed chest down.
There was a bullet hole in the door about two inches in front of where my chest was.
I had fractured ribs, facial bones (I was wearing a lap belt.)

DA considered charging me ... but never even considered prosecuting him. He shot at ME ... LoL.
Oh well, maybe the figured his career was over anyway ... but, why charge me?

Oh, and ... no tip.
You're my fucckkiinngg hero man.
 
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1.5xorbust

Well-Known Member
I was driving a cab in San Francisco in the late 70's, early 80's.
I drove Thurs, Fri, Sat, Sun from 6pm to 6am.

This was Friday morning at about 3am.
I picked up a flag in the Loin.
Hispanic male about my age (25ish).
He got in, I asked where we going ... he showed me a .38 snub and said, "Just drive."
@@@@.
I drove. Told him I had the till in my shirt pocket. He said to just drive and gave me directions that was taking me down to the piers. Not good.
Its funny how time slows to a crawl.
I'm thinking how the hell I'm going to get out of this. The more I thought about it, the more angry I became. I'm thinking "Ya know, I am out here busting my ass to make a living and this mug is going to ... what ... KILL me for a few bucks? Screw that."
I came to the conclusion that he was going to shoot me, and that I was not going to go like that. I was pissed. Really enraged ... quietly. Time slowed some more.
We drove. I offered money again, and was told to shut up.

I don't know when I decided or if I ever did ... but when the spot was right I sped up to about 40 mph. Then 45 mph. I was hoping to attract attention of a cop. He told me to slow down.
At almost the same moment that he said 'slow down', I jerked the wheel to the left and took a telephone pole right in middle of the car.
He was not wearing a seat belt ... yup, he ended up on the hood of the car.

I woke up in ER.
Cop about an inch from my broken nose yelling questions (who's gun? did you crash on purpose? do you know the guy? why didn't you radio in that you had a fare?) - the nurse yelling at him to back off. I tried to answer a couple of questions but I was so swollen he couldn't understand me (prolly just as well).

Bad guy was hurt pretty bad, ended up paralyzed chest down.
There was a bullet hole in the door about two inches in front of where my chest was.
I had fractured ribs, facial bones (I was wearing a lap belt.)

DA considered charging me ... but never even considered prosecuting him. He shot at ME ... LoL.
Oh well, maybe the figured his career was over anyway ... but, why charge me?

Oh, and ... no tip.
Hopefully you never got paired with him again.
 

mbd

Well-Known Member
I was driving a cab in San Francisco in the late 70's, early 80's.
I drove Thurs, Fri, Sat, Sun from 6pm to 6am.

This was Friday morning at about 3am.
I picked up a flag in the Loin.
Hispanic male about my age (25ish).
He got in, I asked where we going ... he showed me a .38 snub and said, "Just drive."
@@@@.
I drove. Told him I had the till in my shirt pocket. He said to just drive and gave me directions that was taking me down to the piers. Not good.
Its funny how time slows to a crawl.
I'm thinking how the hell I'm going to get out of this. The more I thought about it, the more angry I became. I'm thinking "Ya know, I am out here busting my ass to make a living and this mug is going to ... what ... KILL me for a few bucks? Screw that."
I came to the conclusion that he was going to shoot me, and that I was not going to go like that. I was pissed. Really enraged ... quietly. Time slowed some more.
We drove. I offered money again, and was told to shut up.

I don't know when I decided or if I ever did ... but when the spot was right I sped up to about 40 mph. Then 45 mph. I was hoping to attract attention of a cop. He told me to slow down.
At almost the same moment that he said 'slow down', I jerked the wheel to the left and took a telephone pole right in middle of the car.
He was not wearing a seat belt ... yup, he ended up on the hood of the car.

I woke up in ER.
Cop about an inch from my broken nose yelling questions (who's gun? did you crash on purpose? do you know the guy? why didn't you radio in that you had a fare?) - the nurse yelling at him to back off. I tried to answer a couple of questions but I was so swollen he couldn't understand me (prolly just as well).

Bad guy was hurt pretty bad, ended up paralyzed chest down.
There was a bullet hole in the door about two inches in front of where my chest was.
I had fractured ribs, facial bones (I was wearing a lap belt.)

DA considered charging me ... but never even considered prosecuting him. He shot at ME ... LoL.
Oh well, maybe the figured his career was over anyway ... but, why charge me?

Oh, and ... no tip.
Did Clint Eastwood make a movie on this story ?😀 San Fran...or did the police dept suspend him for excessive force ?
 

IR12

Well-Known Member
Mine was a young lady named Holly. When I first saw her she was very challenged to walk. She had a cane in one hand that she put a lot of weight on. She had a brace on one leg from the knee down. At first glance I thought it was a prosthetic leg. Her right arm which hung down appeared to be paralyzed.

When she reached my car door as she struggled to get in I heard her cane hit the outside of my door. I wasn't too happy about that. She got in and told me her name and I started the trip.
She was a young lady I would say to be in her 30s. We started to have a conversation. At one point which turned to her leg and I asked her what happened.

I wasn't expecting the answer that I got. Her injuries were the result of a single bullet entering the back of her head and lodging in the front of her skull between her eyes. To my amazement she showed me the actual X-ray on her phone. You could clearly see the bullet in her skull.

It turns out that Holly received the injury while serving our country in the Navy. She was a combat medic deployed with the Marines in Iraq. She was bent over attending a wounded Marine when a sniper bullet hit her at the base of her skull in the back. It was days before the surgeons attempted to remove the bullet.
She spent a long time recovering. She's now legally blind. Her vision is very limited. Her right arm and right leg we're partially paralyzed. Unfortunately for her this is the best it will ever be.

She was on her way to do volunteer work. Fully retired from the Navy on a disability at this point in her life.
She wasn't bitter but rather a very pleasant person. Quite positive in her attitude and very optimistic. When you meet somebody like that it makes your problems seem very small in comparison.
I thanked her for her service to her country. Pulled up to her destination and watched her struggle as she exited the car. To my amazement 10 minutes later I received a tip in app for $10.

This past Sunday morning I picked up two women who we're going to the airport. It was obvious to me they were both in the military. I started to have a conversation with them about their service in the army. They had both been in Iraq. I told them the story about Holly. To my amazement they both knew exactly who I was talking about. They had heard the story about her in Iraq. They just never knew the outcome. We all commented what a small world it is.
Picked Jack Dorsey up at the Fairmont Hotel Dreamforce Week 3 yrs ago. Dropped him at Google in Mountain View.

To people like this I usually say,
"so, tell me your story" especially if its a long ride. He did.

Another was that Cheryl (?)..oops, forgot her last name but she is/was some top executive at Facebook.

She talked a bit but mostly she read her bible.
 

tohunt4me

Well-Known Member
I just did a search to see if I can find a story on this incredible young lady. Sure enough I found it. Here's her story.



Holly Crabtree is shown in Iraq just before the mission in which a sniper shot her in the head. Holly Crabtree Collection
Sequim veteran, nearly killed in Iraq, works against the odds and toward a college degree [Gallery]
Four years after being shot in the head while serving with the Navy in Iraq, a Port Angeles High School graduate isn’t going to let a sniper’s bullet stop her from achieving her goals.

Retired Navy Chief Petty Officer Holly Crabtree, 34, now lives in Sequim with her uncle, Chuck Engel, and is a single mother to her daughter, Leah Crabtree, 9.

But in the spring of 2010, Crabtree had plans for a full Navy career and was assigned to a combined special operations forces unit as a Navy corpsman and Arabic translator in Iraq when she was targeted by a sniper.


Crabtree was shot in the head during a joint Navy SEAL/Army Special Forces operation in Iraq, a nearly fatal wound that earned her the Purple Heart.

“I don’t regret anything that happened. I love the Navy. I love my job,” she said.

Crabtree was awarded the Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal four times during her 14 years in the Navy.

Today, Crabtree walks with a cane, is legally blind and has difficulty with her memory.

She retired from the Navy to Sequim in 2012, but she’s certainly not taking it easy as she continues to pursue her goals.


Crabtree takes online classes through Trident University International as she works toward a bachelor’s degree in environmental health that she expects to receive in 2016.

She eventually wants to earn a master’s degree that would allow her to work with injured veterans.

“I’d like to work for the Veterans Administration in Seattle or Oregon,” she said.

Crabtree achieved much during her career in the military and even more in recovering from her injuries.

But she said that if people meet her and know her story, she asks that they don’t thank her for her service.

“This is our job,” she said, and added that she is not comfortable with being thanked for 14 years of doing exactly what she wanted to do.

Her brother, Jason Engel, lives in Port Angeles, and her sister, Sgt. First Class Sarah Whatley, is serving with the Army in air traffic control at Fort Hood, Texas.

Crabtree enlisted in the Navy in 1997 as a junior at Port Angeles High School and participated in the Delayed Entry Program until her graduation in 1998.

The Navy trained Crabtree as a hospital corpsman — a job that can range from serving as a pharmacy technician to entering the field of combat serving as combat medical support for the Marine Corps, SEALs or Army Special Forces.


She earned the title of “independent duty corpsman” — the highest level of enlisted medical certification in the Navy.

These are typically assigned to the Marine Corps or ships or submarines that are too small to have their own doctor.

Once she completed that schooling, Crabtree was assigned to the Expeditionary Warfare School, which trains corpsmen and other specialists to work with special operations forces teams, and she earned a Navy Expeditionary Warfare qualification.

She also learned Arabic and was assigned to a mixed Army and Navy special operations forces unit in Iraq.

Although women were technically not assigned to combat units — and no woman has ever qualified for the Navy’s elite special operations unit — women are often attached to such units as “individual augmentees” to provide medical and other support services to soldiers and sailors and to be able to interact with Muslim women.

In addition to her duties in caring for the members of her unit, Crabtree was assigned a female partner from an Army psychological operations unit, and the two were sent to villages to trade medical treatment for information about enemy activity in the area.

“When we walked into a village, they would know I was medical because I had the big pack,” she said.

It was during one such trip, on April 15, 2010 near Ramadi in Iraq’s Anbar Province, that Crabtree was struck in the head by a sniper’s bullet, which she said hit her in the rear, left side of her head and came to rest behind her left eye.

She said she remembers being hit and her team taking care of her.

“I remember waking up in the Humvee,” she said.

When she reached the field hospital, her case was classified as “Hope Trauma,” which means there is little hope for recovery.

She went through a six-hour surgery at the field hospital, which she wasn’t expected to survive.

Against the odds, she survived and was stabilized and evacuated from Iraq to Bethesda Naval Hospital in Maryland.

After about three months, Crabtree became fully aware of her surroundings and began recovering from the devastating injury.

In 2011, she was transferred back to her unit’s home base at MacDill Air Force Base in Florida for physical rehabilitation and discharge from the Navy.

The Navy told Crabtree that she would be given a medical retirement.

“I wanted to stay. They told me I would retire as a first class [petty officer],” Crabtree said.

She had relearned how to walk with the assistance of a cane, but her right arm and vision have not recovered to the same degree.

“It cut my vision in half,” she said.

The likelihood of returning to a level of health that would allow her to resume duty as a corpsman was less than what the Navy required, but Crabtree said she was not ready to give up on the Navy.



While waiting for her retirement paperwork to be completed, Crabtree, then a first class petty officer, she said she discovered that she was eligible to take the Navy’s exam for promotion to chief petty officer.

Since her eyesight had not returned enough to read, the Navy allowed a chief who had already passed his exam to read it to her.

She passed the exam and was promoted to chief hospital corpsman in 2011.

In 2012, with her daughter, she was flown to Naval Hospital Bremerton, where she was retired with honors in a large ceremony attended by Medal of Honor recipient Master Sgt. Leroy Petry, whom Crabtree described as “a close friend.”

Petry, who works with injured veterans in the Tacoma area, has been an inspiration to her, Crabtree said.

“I want to do what he does,” she said.
She was basically a Navy Seal.
Unofficially.
Since the SEALS dont have women.

Read up on her. She was interpretor. Medic. Liason. Could approach and speak with women due to culture where men could not.
They were exchanging medical treatment for information in villages.
This made her a BIG target.
What kind of gay dog loses a fight with a racoon?

She Fought for her dog.
 
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goneubering

Well-Known Member
Mine was a young lady named Holly. When I first saw her she was very challenged to walk. She had a cane in one hand that she put a lot of weight on. She had a brace on one leg from the knee down. At first glance I thought it was a prosthetic leg. Her right arm which hung down appeared to be paralyzed.

When she reached my car door as she struggled to get in I heard her cane hit the outside of my door. I wasn't too happy about that. She got in and told me her name and I started the trip.
She was a young lady I would say to be in her 30s. We started to have a conversation. At one point which turned to her leg and I asked her what happened.

I wasn't expecting the answer that I got. Her injuries were the result of a single bullet entering the back of her head and lodging in the front of her skull between her eyes. To my amazement she showed me the actual X-ray on her phone. You could clearly see the bullet in her skull.

It turns out that Holly received the injury while serving our country in the Navy. She was a combat medic deployed with the Marines in Iraq. She was bent over attending a wounded Marine when a sniper bullet hit her at the base of her skull in the back. It was days before the surgeons attempted to remove the bullet.
She spent a long time recovering. She's now legally blind. Her vision is very limited. Her right arm and right leg we're partially paralyzed. Unfortunately for her this is the best it will ever be.

She was on her way to do volunteer work. Fully retired from the Navy on a disability at this point in her life.
She wasn't bitter but rather a very pleasant person. Quite positive in her attitude and very optimistic. When you meet somebody like that it makes your problems seem very small in comparison.
I thanked her for her service to her country. Pulled up to her destination and watched her struggle as she exited the car. To my amazement 10 minutes later I received a tip in app for $10.

This past Sunday morning I picked up two women who we're going to the airport. It was obvious to me they were both in the military. I started to have a conversation with them about their service in the army. They had both been in Iraq. I told them the story about Holly. To my amazement they both knew exactly who I was talking about. They had heard the story about her in Iraq. They just never knew the outcome. We all commented what a small world it is.
This is the kind of story that restores my faith in this forum. Thx!!
 

Benjamin M

Well-Known Member
At exactly 1,809 trips (really, sit and think about the number of butts in your car), they have really started to mix together.

Most recently was an elderly woman with pretty obvious mental health issues (Dr. Ben would say paranoid schizophrenia), nearly a three hour drive listening to conspiracy theories mixed in with very loud episodes of mania.

Finally dropped her off and couldn't wait to get back to the city.

@ariel5466, I believe this is the trip when I was frantically sending you messages, helplessly lost. 😂 Multiple confusing detours and neither Maps nor Waze had any ideas - either through Farmer John's field or down a road that apparently closed in the 80s. I heard banjos 😝
 

ariel5466

Well-Known Member
Several come to mind, but here's one of my favorites for now. I think I mentioned a shortened version in another thread awhile back but I can't remember where.

In my first week or two I picked up these 2 dude bros at a restaurant on a Saturday afternoon. One got in front, the other in the back. They were the first and so far only people who have been able to identify my Hawaiian Aloha air freshener. As soon as they got in, "oh cool! Your car smells like Hawaii!"

They were obviously totally stoned but super chill and we were joking around and laughing. About halfway through the ride the dude bro in front whispers that he has a secret.
"Okay, what's up?" I said hesitantly.
"We're totally rollin' on E"
With a laugh a said, "I thought you guys were just stoned"
"Oh, we're that, too," says dude bro in the back.
"Well, good thing you got an Uber!"

Then he starts talking about how he just really wanted a hug. Nothing sexual, he was just a hugger, and E made him want to hug people. I told him when I dropped them off I'd give him a hug 😁

As we get closer to the ice cream place I'm dropping them off at, dude bro in front invites me to come hang out with them for the day. I said I would love to but I needed to be out here, driving and making money. That's when the dude bro in the back says he'll give me $200 just to spend the day with them.
"Dude, you can't say that!" says dude bro in the front.
"Naw man, it's not prostitution, just hanging out!"

I told them I would consider it if I thought dude bro in the back was serious and joked that I doubted he had $200 to give me.
"Yeah, your right..." he says.

I get them to their ice cream and pull over and park. We all get out and I give them each a hug, which seemed to make them very happy 🤣

5 star rating, no tip.
 

R3drang3r

Well-Known Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #33
She was basically a Navy Seal.
Unofficially.
Since the SEALS dont have women.

Read up on her. She was interpretor. Medic. Liason. Could approach and speak with women due to culture where men could not.
They were exchanging medical treatment for information in villages.
This made her a BIG target.

She Fought for her dog.
Demi Moore was a Navy SEAL.😅

No seriously you're absolutely right.
 

Norm22

Active Member
In house chiropractor for Cirque De Soliel, 25 years raising his kids in Thailand France Australia and Brazil? Single dad who's wife bailed when all three kids under four, 1 was 9 months old. They all speak multiple languages and have cool international jobs. He told to drink more water and get out and walk after every two trips. fixed my neck/shoulder crick from driving. Never would have known if he hadn't seen my son's picture on phone wallpaper interesting dude.

Another dude who started a company where every employee flew to a training exercise but he was too sick. Plane crashed his whole company died. Then he too a plane tour in a biplane two days before I was driving him to airport it crashed the next day (day before I drove him). I didn't sat the obvious.

Too many hookers/bikini only girls to tell in a post. Had three "witches" once. They talked about spirit animals and said "I bt this is th most interesting passengers you ever had". Not even that night LOL.
 

Norm22

Active Member
In house chiropractor for Cirque De Soliel, 25 years raising his kids in Thailand France Australia and Brazil? Single dad who's wife bailed when all three kids under four, 1 was 9 months old. They all speak multiple languages and have cool international jobs. He told me to drink more water and get out and walk after every two trips. He fixed my neck/shoulder crick from driving. I never would have known if he hadn't seen my son's picture on phone wallpaper, interesting dude.

Another dude who started a company where every employee flew to a training exercise except for him, because he was too sick. Their plane crashed and his whole company died. Then he took a plane tour in a biplane two days before I was driving him to airport it crashed the next day (day before I drove him). I didn't say the obvious when I dropped him at airport.

Too many hookers and bikini only girls to tell about in one post. Did have three "witches" once. They talked about spirit animals and said "I bet this is the most interesting passengers you've ever had". Not even that night LOL. Sorry for crap punctuation.
 

BillC

Well-Known Member
My 2 most completely memorable rides:

1) First night ever driving in March 2017, I pick up 2 flaming gay guys from the most popular gay bar in Minneapolis: The Gay 90s. They get in and after us greeting each other, they ignore me. We'll call them 1 and 2 for simplicity's sake. For the first 3rd of the ride, 1 tries to convince 2 to come up to his apartment. 2 repeatedly declines, saying he has to work tomorrow (Sunday) morning. For the middle 3rd of the ride, they talk about other topics of conversation. A few minutes away from their destination, 1 suddenly bursts out into tears. 2 tries to console him with phrases like "It's ok", "No one cares", "don't worry about it", etc. All of a sudden, 1 tearfully blurts out "I CAN'T BELIEVE I JACKED THAT GUY OFF ON THE DANCE FLOOR!"

It took every fiber of my being to not burst out laughing, but I managed to keep it inside.

No tip.

2) Late 2017, Picked up an African-American gent on the far east side of St Paul, MN, going to the far west side. Shortly after he gets in, his cell phone rings. He answers it, LITERALLY, "Hey, my n***** b****!" (rhymes with jigger witch). This was his nick name for her, and he REPEATEDLY called her by this name. For nearly the remainder of his 15 minute ride, I was treated to his phone conversation detailing exactly how much sex he was going to have with her (including anal) and how enthusiastically he was going to perform it. When he ended his phone call, he said "I am SO going to @@@@ her in the ass, brother! She won't be able to walk! I'm going to pound her out!" Among other descriptive phrases. I could not detect him being drunk. He was very clear spoken.

No tip.

Bonus: Last year, I picked up a group of 5 or 6 women out for a bachelorette party. They asked me "Can you tell us stories about your craziest passengers!" I regaled them with 4 or 5 examples, ending with the two listed above. When I told them #1, they sort of laughed and said "EWWWWW GROOOOOSSSSSSS!!!!!". When I told them about #2 above, 3 minutes of awkward silence ensued. It was at that point that I decided to become much more selective of which passengers I told the story of #2.

$3 tip. *shrug*

I've never driven anyone even remotely famous on a local level, let alone national.
 

Uber Crack

Well-Known Member
Author
Cougar.....intoxicated....mad that her female friend wouldnt let her do the dirty with her that night.....took out her frustrations on...um, herself.

Gave me $38 cash and walked out of my car completely naked, using her clothes to cover her augments breasts as she walked into her house.
But, did you rate her five stars? 🤔
 
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