When does it go downhill?

evanswes88

New Member
My Story:
I am starting a new job in the middle of August and needed some money to hold me over for a little bit.
My previous job required many miles of driving. Drive a 08 Honda CRV, so great on gas and very reliable.
I started Uber last Thursday and have been going pretty strong.

Every day I drove a bunch of hours but have made at least $100 every day.
Saturday it rained like hell and worked all day and made $260.

My plan is to bust out uber for the next 4 weeks at least to keep some income coming in.
Anyone got any advice or anything I should know that would make my experience less than favorable.

After I start the new job I might do some runs on weekends to keep some extra cash.
I know rates have dropped but I don't know it any other way.

WHENS IT GO DOWNHILL?
 

Wil_Iam_Fuber'd

Well-Known Member
Lol. It started going downhill the moment you downloaded the partner app. Most people notice in about 60-90 days, when the new driver incentives and the novelty factor wear off. But you only have to survive another 4-5 weeks. Think of it like summer school. It mostly blows but it will end soon enough.
 

evanswes88

New Member
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  • #4
Yeah I am working for $10-$15 an hour and paying for gas. It seems pretty legit for that rate with nothing else to do for my time.
I guess my situation is different than most so it doesn't seem like I am going to be in 3 months with tons of miles gone. My car has always been a huge write off for my business expenses and has always been used to rack up miles(why I drive a Honda).

Also, I feel like I come across a lot of $10-15 rides. Maybe its just been a good start but I will have my ass out at 7 getting those workers in the morning.
 

evanswes88

New Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #5
I haven't seen anything about new driver incentives since I signed up. They seem to not want to pay on those I guess.
 

Another Uber Driver

Well-Known Member
Moderator
Lol. It started going downhill the moment you downloaded the partner app.
In reality, Original Poster is using Uber for a purpose for which it works. He has four weeks until he starts a new job. He needs a little cashflow until then. He might need it for six weeks, as he may not receive his first paycheck for two weeks after he starts. Uber driving works for that.

Just plug away at it. I do not know your market well, so there is not much for me to state about that, but, as a general rule, if you plug away at it, you do get better at it.

A couple of things, though.

Uber holds your cancellation rate against you, even if it is a legitimate cancellation such as a passenger's failure to show. You want to keep cancellations to a minimum. If you contact a passenger and he is not at the address that the application shows you, he has too many people in his party, or whatever, make every effort to get the passenger to cancel. That does not count against you. If you accept a trip, make every effort to cover it.

Uber does not hold your acceptance rate against you. If you have a low acceptance rate, it will send you nastygrams, but it will not act against you (de-activate or suspend). It will put you on a time-out, the length of which varies, if you cancel three trips in one hour, let expire three pings in an hour or a combination of the above. The cancellation for a legitimate reason counts against you for this one, too.

The point of the acceptance rate business is that you should not accept pings that are too far away. I am in the Big City, so in the City, I will not accept a ping that is more than five minutes away. I will widen the net a bit in the suburbs, but it depends where. In no case will I accept a ping that will take me more than fifteen minutes to cover. There are three reasons that you do not want to do too much travelling:

1. Dead miles cost money.
2. You could be running for twenty minutes/fifteen miles to pick up someone who is going three blocks. Time is money.
3. Uber users are an impatient lot. You will get twelve of the fifteen miles to the customer and he will cancel. To be sure, you will collect a cancellation fee that ranges from three to four dollars, after Uber takes its cut, depending on the market. Still, it is not worth it to drive even three miles for that cancellation fee.

I do not know if Uber Pool is available in your market. If it is, under no circumstances should you accept one that is more than five minutes from you. Uber compensates drivers poorly on Uber Pool, while it gets rich on them. It is just not worth your trouble, even if you do get a match.

Do not chase surges. It will expire by the time that you get there or the application will jerk you out of the surge zone for a base rate trip.

Keep the pay statement e-Mails, keep track of your mileage on and off and keep track of your expenses. You will have to give that to your accountant at tax time. Uber will send you a 1099.

Oh, and welcome to the Forum.
 

kc ub'ing!

Well-Known Member
2 months + in it for me and I'm still having a ball! Glad you are too. My advice, ignore the more cynical and bitter posters here. Always looking to pee on a contented Uberer's cornflakes! You get out of it what you put into it! Spiritually if not economically. Best in between job job I've ever had!
 

SibeRescueBrian

Well-Known Member
Moderator
Another Uber Driver why bother with all the advice? By the time OP finishes your post or learns this stuff he'll be almost done gubering. Lucky him!
That's one of the reasons this forum exists; as a place for drivers to exchange experiences, information, and advice. Even if, as you say, the OP finishes Ubering before reading the post (unlikely), others who read this thread may find it enlightening and useful.
 

m1a1mg

Active Member
Don't accept rides that require you to drive more than X number of miles. My limit is 6, and then only to specific areas that normally have long runs. The key is quickly learning areas that have the best rides. Every place seems to be different.
 

5 Star Guy

Well-Known Member
Geez with seven posts and 2 mods the number one issue that will make it all downhill is an accident. :eek::rolleyes: Your insurance is void while doing this and you will use Travass'. No medical for you, no rental, you can't use another car doing this while yours is getting fixed, there is a 1K deductible if the accident is your fault. In other words all of the money you think you made could easily be gone and you owing more money.

Not knowing your state, county, airport regulations can get you thousands in tickets. You're not allowed to pick up pax at some airports, some counties you're not allowed to drive in, you need to know the law on child seats, taking ADA dogs, there are a lot of things that can make it downhill, including losing money when you look at all of your costs. :biggrin:
 

evanswes88

New Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #12
Thanks another uber driver for all the info. There a lot of negative nancys around here. I enjoy driving and listening to music, talking to folks and learning how to navigate the fantastic triangle. I feel bad that so many people on this site feel the need to drive and comment about how much they hate their lives and their opportunities. Uber drivers are so mad at the world!:biggrin:
 

Euius

Well-Known Member
WHENS IT GO DOWNHILL?
IF you are self-activating, keep good records and are halfway decent with math, it doesn't.

If after a bit you want to laze around all day in hour plus airport queues, or pretend sitting in some isolated area is working, or can't seem to grasp that your cost isn't 54 cents a mile just because the IRS lets you deduct that much (including trying to pretend your depreciation for miles is something huge, when really it's only 5 or 6 cents), or try to charge off your insurance and phone as if it was some brand new expense you wouldn't have if you weren't doing Uber, then it'll go downhill really fast.

Actually with a 08 Honda CRV, you've got only a 1 or 2 cent per mile depreciation, and you can do XL rates. Although 20 / 27 mpg isn't exactly good, you should avoid X and Pool altogether.
 
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5 Star Guy

Well-Known Member
Thanks another uber driver for all the info. There a lot of negative nancys around here. I enjoy driving and listening to music, talking to folks and learning how to navigate the fantastic triangle. I feel bad that so many people on this site feel the need to drive and comment about how much they hate their lives and their opportunities. Uber drivers are so mad at the world!:biggrin:
No one is Nancy Negative here, just the facts. :biggrin: By all means give it a shot, have fun and enjoy yourself. I just saw an accident in front of me, soon after I posted my comment on accidents. :eek: I was in a bad accident, same kind as today getting T-boned. I had to pay for a rental for two months, I was not driving for Travass at the time. As long as you are aware of everything you can either disregard it, take a chance and have fun or stay at home knowing the odds of a positive cash flow are good driving, making an actual profit is not. :rolleyes:
 

Another Uber Driver

Well-Known Member
Moderator
Best in between job job I've ever had!
Thanks another uber driver for all the info. Uber drivers are so mad at the world!
Do understand. Original Poster. that there is much negative to be stated about Uber (or any TNC, for that matter) and much of it is deserved. On the other side, if you know what you are getting into and it meets your needs, it is fine. You intend to use it for a purpose for which it works: you need a little cashflow until you start your next job. TNC work will provide that. It appears that this is the purpose for which kc ub'ing! uses it. It works for that. If you think that TNC work will keep the roof from leaking and put food on the table for the long-term, you are going to be disappointed (unless, of course, Uber makes some of the incentives that it is giving in this market both permanent and nationwide. In THAT case, you will be able to pay the rent and the grocery bills driving TNC).

It is good as a part-time job, as well. If you need a few extra dollars for the cable bill, to pay your bar bills, to take the wife to dinner or you want to go to a Panthers game, it works for that.

TNC work is like anything else. Look into it, understand your needs and purposes, see if it fits them. If it looks like it will, do it.

Uber offers a programme through eXchange Leasing that puts drivers into cars. Most posters on these Boards will post, in LARGE SIZED RED BOLD-FACE CAPSLOCK "DON'T DO IT!!!!!!!"
There are, however, a couple of posters, here, who did look into it, thoroughly familiarised themselves with it and its terms, compared it to their needs and found that it would work for them. In fact, some have stated that it is working for them. If you know how to work it and it suits your purposes, you can do well at it.

TNC work, like much other, is similar. Figure out how to make it suit your purposes and work it.

Usually, I drive a cab. I live in a one-business town (although many will assert that the business of Congress is No-Business-As-Usual, especially given who is running Congress now---not that their predecessors were any better, mind you). While the rest of the country might not notice the difference when Congress is out, we do, here. Still, people do live and work here and do need rides. I drive TNC more than I do the cab, for now. When the college freshmen show up, I will drive the cab more. After Labour Day, I will drive it yet more. Depending on what, if any, incentives Uber is offering, I might drive more TNC, I might not. Usually, I drive only a little more than enough to stay in the game. That works for me and that is how I work it. Yes, it leaves something to be desired, but still, I can work it.
 
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