What does "Deliver to the Door" mean?

FloFocus

New Member
I operate in an extremely pretentious and entitled city (DC metro area) where there are lots of high rise apartment buildings filled with young professional millennials who order Uber eats quite a bit. I've worked in hospitality and restaurants for several years, and thought it was a given that if someone is handling my food they should be tipped. I mean I always tip the pizza delivery guy and the Chinese food delivery guy. When I first started delivering with uber eats, I would go through the hassle of finding parking, figuring out how to get into these secured buildings, checking in with the concierge, riding the elevator up to the 12th floor, and then walking to the very last apartment at the end of the hallway to deliver the food. Only to discover after I get back to my car and end the trip, that more often than not, these people aren't tipping. When I check back after a day or two, still no tip. I did notice that when I go in the app to rate the delivery, I can give them a thumbs down for not meeting me outside. I interpreted this to mean that Deliver to the Door means that I'm only required to deliver to the front door of the building, and that I don't have to feel obligated to go through the hassle of being buzzed up and taking an elevator ride. When people ask me to come up to their apartment, I ask them to meet me in the lobby. Sometimes I get push back, but I've decided that I'm ok with that because most likely, they're not leaving a tip. Furthermore, in the DC area, parking is so hard to find and not free and it's very easy to be ticketed and towed. (Of course Uber is not picking up that tab.) Even if Uber does not care about the delivery partner, it's in the company's interest to require customers to meet downstairs. The sooner I end the delivery trip, the smaller my share of the fee that uber charges to the restaurant will be.
 

Invisible

Well-Known Member
Welcome!

It means just that, deliver the food to his/door. Even if it’s a place you can’t find parking, has no working elevator and they’re on the 6th floor, customer wants you to deliver to the door of their house, apt/condo unit number, hotel room, if the hotel permits it.

Uber is looking at the customers interest, not what’s faster for the driver or what would make the most sense.
 
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FloFocus

New Member
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  • #3
You must not live in a city where you've been slapped with a $100 parking ticket while trying to deliver some kid a smoothie.
Can you maybe link me to some uber literature on that? Because I've assigned a much more discretionary meaning to it. I don't think the mantra that the customer is always right is necessarily true in this gig economy. These transactions in theory are supposed to be more mutually beneficial where we all give a little to get a little. I've never had a fee taken back because someone had to meet me in the lobby to get their food rather than wait in their warm, cozy apartment in their PJs for me to bring it up to them. So I ultimately have to do what's in my best interest.
 

JimKE

Well-Known Member
Welcome!

It means just that, deliver the food to his/door. Even if it’s a place you can’t find parking, has no working elevator and they’re on the 6th floor, customer wants you to deliver to the door of their house, apt/condo unit number, hotel room, if the hotel permits it.

Uber is looking at the customers interest, not what’s faster for the driver or what would make the most sense.
And if they are in the bathroom, they expect the food to be delivered to the bathroom door.

Uber is not responsible for your parking tickets, or any other problems you might encounter. Those are YOUR problem. Uber doesn't care.
 

IR12

Well-Known Member
I operate in an extremely pretentious and entitled city (DC metro area) where there are lots of high rise apartment buildings filled with young professional millennials who order Uber eats quite a bit. I've worked in hospitality and restaurants for several years, and thought it was a given that if someone is handling my food they should be tipped. I mean I always tip the pizza delivery guy and the Chinese food delivery guy. When I first started delivering with uber eats, I would go through the hassle of finding parking, figuring out how to get into these secured buildings, checking in with the concierge, riding the elevator up to the 12th floor, and then walking to the very last apartment at the end of the hallway to deliver the food. Only to discover after I get back to my car and end the trip, that more often than not, these people aren't tipping. When I check back after a day or two, still no tip. I did notice that when I go in the app to rate the delivery, I can give them a thumbs down for not meeting me outside. I interpreted this to mean that Deliver to the Door means that I'm only required to deliver to the front door of the building, and that I don't have to feel obligated to go through the hassle of being buzzed up and taking an elevator ride. When people ask me to come up to their apartment, I ask them to meet me in the lobby. Sometimes I get push back, but I've decided that I'm ok with that because most likely, they're not leaving a tip. Furthermore, in the DC area, parking is so hard to find and not free and it's very easy to be ticketed and towed. (Of course Uber is not picking up that tab.) Even if Uber does not care about the delivery partner, it's in the company's interest to require customers to meet downstairs. The sooner I end the delivery trip, the smaller my share of the fee that uber charges to the restaurant will be.
Perhaps UE isn't a great fit for you.
What about an area not so densley populated?
Even better, why not write ...a novel?
 

reg barclay

Well-Known Member
Moderator
I've never used Eats as a customer, but always assumed 'deliver to door' is standard, as opposed to 'wait in car' which some customers select. Thankfully I work mostly suburbs so not much of an issue.
 

AtomicBlonde

Well-Known Member
Sure, you can thumb-down the customer for not meeting you outside. Or for a variety of other reasons! Take out your frustrations! You'll show those jerks! They're getting a THUMBS DOWN! They'll definitely change their evil ways after this.

Or, more seriously, think about what rating the customer actually means: nothing. Can you, when you're deciding whether or not to accept an order, see the customer's rating? You cannot. You can't decline a ping because the customer is rated low. Do you think Uber is going to cut off low-rated customers? Ha! So what does it mean? It's there to give you the feeling that you have something to say about the situation. But you do not.

If it says "deliver to door" (the default is "meet outside") then the customer wants you to deliver to their door. Not to their building or general area. You can call or message him and explain why you can't do that, or whatever, but that's between you and the customer. If it's a hotel where you're not allowed up to the rooms, usually customers understand. Otherwise? Good luck. You're going to the door.
 

FloFocus

New Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #11
Why deliver to metro areas? When I did Uber Eats, I avoided pickups in areas that could deliver to high rise apartment areas, and worked areas where the housing was predominantly suburban.
I don't know how familiar you are with this area, but first of all it's more convenient to where I live. I started doing eats so that I could avoid having to go on longer trips that would take me very far from where i live. I'm only a couple miles outside of the heart of the city, and it's hard to fight traffic to get out to the suburbs. Also, all of the consecutive trips bonus zones are in DC proper and a small area of the perimeter immediately outside the city. This is also where the demand is with more people and restaurants crammed into this area, so it enables me to crank out a lot of trips for quest purposes as well. I have tried driving out to the suburbs on the weekends and even then I've had my string of trips eventually route me back to the city. But during the week, it's nearly impossible to venture outside of your immediate area, and I'd basically be wasting time during peak meal times for deliveries sitting in traffic.
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Perhaps UE isn't a great fit for you.
What about an area not so densley populated?
Even better, why not write ...a novel?
I have my reasons for doing what I do. But thanks! I have actually considered writing a book. Unfortunately, this pesky rent needs to be paid in the meantime.
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I've never used Eats as a customer, but always assumed 'deliver to door' is standard, as opposed to 'wait in car' which some customers select. Thankfully I work mostly suburbs so not much of an issue.
I was dating a guy who lived in a different part of the metro area, and we ordered uber eats quite regularly. I remember him saying, "The food is almost here. Let me go downstairs because I know they don't like coming up to the apartment. " Apparently the drivers in that area had him trained. This was before I was even driving, so I wasnt the one to school him.
 
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FloFocus

New Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #13
If it says "deliver to door" (the default is "meet outside") then the customer wants you to deliver to their door. Not to their building or general area. You can call or message him and explain why you can't do that, or whatever, but that's between you and the customer. If it's a hotel where you're not allowed up to the rooms, usually customers understand. Otherwise? Good luck. You're going to the door.
"Deliver to the Door" is actually the default, and means different things to different customers. So that's why I'm comfortable assigning my own meaning to it. Some people select it, and when I send the auto text "I have arrived," they let me know that they are coming down. Some deliveries say Deliver to the Door and the customer is waiting outside when I pull up. I'm convinced that most customers are using this app pretty absentmindedly anyways when they do things like put in the wrong address or order a Subway sandwich from the Subway in Alexandria which is 3 towns away across a bridge as I'm passing at least 10 other Subways en route to them only to have it delivered to the mall where they work that has a Subway in its food court that participates in Uber eats (This has actually happened!)

I thought it was obvious that I was posing more of a rhetorical question. I decided that I don't go up to people's apartments... so I don't.
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I thought my neck of the woods, Beverly Hills in particular, had those markets cornered! :biggrin:
Oh no. These twenty- something, Ivy League Alums working on Capitol Hill wrote the book!! ??
 

AtomicBlonde

Well-Known Member
If "deliver to door" is the default in your market, then assigning your own meaning to it is valid, just as I have to interpret "wait in car" to mean "maybe go to the door, or whatever". I didn't know "deliver to door" could be the default in some places. It wasn't even an option here until recently.
 

Wildgoose

Well-Known Member
Deliver to door option is for home and house. For the apartment building, Uber doesn't give customers an option to put their apartment number in the app. Stupid customer already notice it but they chose this deliver to door option anyway.
 

amazinghl

Well-Known Member
Can you maybe link me to some uber literature on that?
Happy to


Where should I meet my delivery partner?
In most cases, your food will be delivered right to your door. If your address is difficult to get to, it may be faster and easier for everyone if you meet your delivery outside by the street. You can also include special delivery instructions before confirming your order.

Once your food is on the way, you can contact your delivery partner directly by tapping CONTACT on the order tracking screen. This is often the best way to coordinate an exact dropoff spot if you aren't sure where it will be. Keep in mind that your delivery partner may be driving - for safety, they may not be available to answer the phone or write a message.


Will my courier bring the meal to my door or inside my office?

Your courier will bring your order right to your door. If it's easiest for you to walk outside—that's fine too. You can always meet the courier at the curb.
 

BunnyK

Well-Known Member
I operate in an extremely pretentious and entitled city (DC metro area) where there are lots of high rise apartment buildings filled with young professional millennials who order Uber eats quite a bit. I've worked in hospitality and restaurants for several years, and thought it was a given that if someone is handling my food they should be tipped. I mean I always tip the pizza delivery guy and the Chinese food delivery guy. When I first started delivering with uber eats, I would go through the hassle of finding parking, figuring out how to get into these secured buildings, checking in with the concierge, riding the elevator up to the 12th floor, and then walking to the very last apartment at the end of the hallway to deliver the food. Only to discover after I get back to my car and end the trip, that more often than not, these people aren't tipping. When I check back after a day or two, still no tip. I did notice that when I go in the app to rate the delivery, I can give them a thumbs down for not meeting me outside. I interpreted this to mean that Deliver to the Door means that I'm only required to deliver to the front door of the building, and that I don't have to feel obligated to go through the hassle of being buzzed up and taking an elevator ride. When people ask me to come up to their apartment, I ask them to meet me in the lobby. Sometimes I get push back, but I've decided that I'm ok with that because most likely, they're not leaving a tip. Furthermore, in the DC area, parking is so hard to find and not free and it's very easy to be ticketed and towed. (Of course Uber is not picking up that tab.) Even if Uber does not care about the delivery partner, it's in the company's interest to require customers to meet downstairs. The sooner I end the delivery trip, the smaller my share of the fee that uber charges to the restaurant will be.
Good job on learning quickly.
 
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