What do I do if I have zero receipts or records of anything?

Ian Richard Markham

Well-Known Member
For my taxes, I didn’t keep a record of a single thing during 2018 and did about 5k trips. I bought a Dyson vacuum for my car for $350 though and got several $225 detail jobs that I want to expense.
 

nighthawk398

Well-Known Member
just pray for no audits
Post automatically merged:

plus I'm sure you have statements unless you paid cash each time
 

Cary Grant

Well-Known Member
You should keep a daily log of your miles. Handwritten beats all electronic forms, regardless of comments to the contrary by the somnambulant members of the franchise.

Your tax return specifically asks if you have these records IN WRITING. If you don't have them, you can guess, but you will have no fun with an auditor. During an examination, pulling out a written log allows the examiner to check a box and move on, easy peasy.

If you pull out a print out, spreadsheet, or worse, some kind of app on your phone, the examiner will check a different box, and then your troubles are just starting. Red flags open up many doors for the Service to roto-rooter you on the reg.

Failure to keep excellent records = you will pay more tax. TANSTAAFL
 

Uberbrent

Well-Known Member
You should keep a daily log of your miles. Handwritten beats all electronic forms, regardless of comments to the contrary by the somnambulant members of the franchise.

Your tax return specifically asks if you have these records IN WRITING. If you don't have them, you can guess, but you will have no fun with an auditor. During an examination, pulling out a written log allows the examiner to check a box and move on, easy peasy.

If you pull out a print out, spreadsheet, or worse, some kind of app on your phone, the examiner will check a different box, and then your troubles are just starting. Red flags open up many doors for the Service to roto-rooter you on the reg.

Failure to keep excellent records = you will pay more tax. TANSTAAFL

Normally you are a voice of reason, but when you say if you pull out a printout, spreadsheet, etc. your troubles are just starting is a lie. I filed with the managing partner of Lane, Gorman and I trust her judgement on the matter much more than yours. She is the one that demanded that I use an app to track miles and assured me that it is accepted by the IRS. If you refuse to join this century with regards to record keeping that is your choice and is accepted by the IRS as well, but don’t use scare tactics to justify your decision to others. Of course using a reputable service for taxes also means they stand behind their work and will go and take care of any audit that arises.
 

Cary Grant

Well-Known Member
Normally you are a voice of reason, but when you say if you pull out a printout, spreadsheet, etc. your troubles are just starting is a lie. I filed with the managing partner of Lane, Gorman and I trust her judgement on the matter much more than yours. She is the one that demanded that I use an app to track miles and assured me that it is accepted by the IRS. If you refuse to join this century with regards to record keeping that is your choice and is accepted by the IRS as well, but don’t use scare tactics to justify your decision to others. Of course using a reputable service for taxes also means they stand behind their work and will go and take care of any audit that arises.

Your lack of proper judgment is manifest by your knee jerk reaction to having hired poor help that gave you very bad advice. Nothing you say will change that fact.
 

Uberbrent

Well-Known Member
I will show the good people ar Lane Gorman your response and calling them poor help...I think their lawyers are always interested in defamation. When you disparage the work of a class firm in a forum, wouldn’t you call that a knee jerk reaction? You can have an opinion about what you think the optimum method to do taxes might be, but you may have taken it a bit too far.
 

Cary Grant

Well-Known Member
The funny thing about poor help, be it legal, accounting, investment advice, or other professional advice by qualified help, especially among those of us who work in adversarial environments, is this: One party wins, one party loses. Both party's counsel profit in the battle. The only loser is the client that picked the bad counsel, and that's half the talent pool on any given day.

Bad accountants give bad advice, just like bad attorneys give bad advice, because many of them profit from taking advantage of the somnambulant -- what we in the business refer to as the walking dead.

I've seen Enrolled Agents without a degree stomp a mudhole in the arse of a JD, LLM, CPA, and then walk that mudhole dry. They knew their business, and knew it better than anyone else present before the judge.

I've been in the room when managing partners at the largest accounting firms in the midwest were fired for not knowing their business. The Dilbert Principle is very real.

To wit: Schedule C, Part IV - Questions 43 to 47, inclusive. Please pay close attention to 47a and 47b. Read it and weep Scheißebird.


In my four-plus decades of filing Schedule Cs, I've had to answer this question every year. I answer it the only right way, because I keep written records. I'm a Learned Hand fan (see Helvering v. Gregory, 69 F.2d 809, 2d Cir. 1934). If you want to do it the other way, that invariably results in you paying more tax, then Uncle Sugar and I both thank you for your additional contribution.
 

Uberbrent

Well-Known Member
Like I said, you can have your opinion on how to do your taxes, but disparaging any known accounting firm in a public forum is a little beyond the pale...same goes for the scare tactics of using modern record keeping.

To each his on.
 

steveK2016

Well-Known Member

5k trips with such piss poor planning and record keeping yet you think you can perfect $600 in earnings every week day. Hahaha
Post automatically merged:

Your lack of proper judgment is manifest by your knee jerk reaction to having hired poor help that gave you very bad advice. Nothing you say will change that fact.

My CPA has been perfectly content and confident of any chances of an audit with my digital log. They dont even need physical receipts anymore, scanned copies are accepted by the IRS. It is 2019 after all.

I, too, trust my highly educated and well versed accounting and tax professional in this regard as he would not give me such advise on taxes that he signs off on, risking his position and livelihood.
 

PlayLoud

Well-Known Member
For my taxes, I didn’t keep a record of a single thing during 2018 and did about 5k trips. I bought a Dyson vacuum for my car for $350 though and got several $225 detail jobs that I want to expense.
I have a statement just showing a purchase at Target but nothing on there says it was for a vacuum cleaner. Paid cash for the car washes.
I'm having trouble buying this story. You did 5k trips, but didn't know to track miles, or save receipts for car washes? And you got multiple $225 detail jobs? Paid in cash?

If you aren't trolling, just deduct the miles reported to you by Uber. You're screwed on the car detailing. In the future, save your receipts and track your mileage.
 

NTXDFWDriver2017

Active Member
i have mile iq that i have installed in my smart phone. It is automatically keeping track of miles driven. Now what i have to do is figure which miles are uber and lyft and classify those accordingly. My only regret is im a lazy ass @@@@ i didnt do it for the whole year of 2018. Gotta spend this weekend getting paper raped.
 

steveK2016

Well-Known Member
Now personal attacks...the true final argument of the snowflakes that abound. I really thought you were above this sort of thing, but your true self shows through. I’m not arguing with you and you don’t understand the difference between a fact and an opinion. There are many ways to correctly do your taxes - some prefer to modernize with acceptable standards by the IRS. Will you share the IRS.gov link if I’m wrong in my thinking? How about your “facts” - do they have a link on IRS.gov? Show us all the statement where 5he IRS says that during an audit 5hey check a different box for automated printouts vs hand written records. I’ll wait.

If you choose to respond without real facts, then that’s up to you to “step in”.


Some businesses choose to use electronic accounting software programs or some other type of electronic system to capture and organize their records. The electronic accounting software program or electronic system you choose should meet the same basic recordkeeping principles mentioned above. All requirements that apply to hard copy books and records also apply to electronic records.


Q1. Why is the IRS using electronic accounting records instead of continuing to use traditional paper books and records in examinations?

A: Electronic information management has become the standard in the private sector and is now being used to enhance the IRS examination process. Obtaining accounting records in electronic format provides significant advantages:

-Reduces burden because taxpayers and/or representatives don’t have to print records provided electronically.
-Provides a complete set of the taxpayer’s accounting records, decreasing the number of items included in the initial document request and follow-up requests.
-Increases efficiency of the examiner’s analysis and testing of the books and records.




Honestly 47b is probably a checkmark to indicate to the processor "shit, we have to read someones chicken shit hand writting if we audit him? Screw it..." In no way does that indicate to me that its "mandatory" to hand write your log. It fact it doesnt say hand written. If handwritten was mandatory, it wouldnt ask it as an option.

An excel sheet with proper formulas will do all the tabulations quickly and accurately, as well as easily readable.
 
Last edited:
Top