Updated List of Markets Where UberX Commission For New Drivers Is 25% Or 28%

chi1cabby

Well-Known Member
Washington DC, 25%
Cut Off date 10/11/15

Screenshot_2015-10-12-14-57-26.png
 

UberMeow

New Member
Athens, GA is 25% for new .. still 20% for oldies.. I got a day or so of trips at 25% when I edited my vehicles. . They fixed and told me about the new rate on new pax
Ps. Also added xl at 28%
 

glasgowuber

New Member
Here in the uk new cities rolled out are starting at 25% ! Old ones are being put up to 25% as well ,London has just been put up gaining uber 50 million per year !
 

secretadmirer

Well-Known Member
I'm surprised it hasn't hit over 30% yet. Some areas like Detroit the safety fee is over $2, and .75/mile, and yet there are still more drivers signing on there. The only rationale I can think of is that they're mathematically challenged.
 

eyewall

Active Member
I'm surprised it hasn't hit over 30% yet. Some areas like Detroit the safety fee is over $2, and .75/mile, and yet there are still more drivers signing on there. The only rationale I can think of is that they're mathematically challenged.

At 75 cents a mile they might as well have the PAX kick you in the balls before each ride.
 

glados

Active Member
At 75 cents a mile they might as well have the PAX kick you in the balls before each ride.
$0.75 / mile is the same as $1.10 per mile with 32% less dead miles and waiting times. Lower fares result in higher demand, and more rides per hour (less waiting time) and shorter ETAs due to more demand (leading to more supply).

There's also the per minute rate.
 

Huberis

Well-Known Member
$0.75 / mile is the same as $1.10 per mile with 32% less dead miles and waiting times. Lower fares result in higher demand, and more rides per hour (less waiting time) and shorter ETAs due to more demand (leading to more supply).

There's also the per minute rate.
Either scenario is below cost and thus an example of noncompetitive rates owner operators are being forced to drive at.

If given the choice, neither of the scenarios you describe would be considered plausible. Driver should be fighting for the right to act and be respected as owner operators. Drivers should be able to set their own rates within a range of acceptable rates as determined by a regulatory commission. Prices should e set with the actual verified costs an individual driver incurs with their particular vehicle.

What you describe is the paradigm for self serving corporate greed.
 
  • Like
Reactions: HOU

TheWhiteTiger

Active Member
Has the very latest "Service Fee Addendum" for OC been discussed yet? Drivers activated in other cities (even those activated before October) now pay 25% commission when they accept rides in OC?!
 

BlackDog

Member
Some fun with math...

Seattle
Fare $ 4.51
Rider Fee $ 1.40
Rider Fee taken by Uber - $ 1.40
Uber fee $ .90

Payout $ 3.61

Crazy. Sometimes I get several of these in a row and 3 rides takes up 1 hour. Deduct gas and wear and tear. Not good for earnings...
 

UberEddie2015

Well-Known Member
Why does everyone minus SRF before stating the fare. Fare is total charged to pax. case above fare is $5.91. Rider fee $1.40. Comm .90. Uber gets 2.30 Driver get 3.61. Uber gets 39% Driver gets 61%.
 

Fauxknight

Well-Known Member
$0.75 / mile

There's also the per minute rate.

The per minute in Detroit is $.15, so $.15 multiplied to one hour and minus the 28% commission is $6.48/hour.

So assuming the driver has someone his car every hour he works, but he drives 0 miles every day, he makes $6.48/hour profit. The first problem is if he doesn't have the app actively billing 100% of the time then his profits go down. The second problem is that the Federal tax deduction is higher than his per mile gross, meaning he literally takes a loss for every billed mile, not to mention still having some dead miles.

So let's assume the driver can bill 50% of the minutes he is out, that puts him at $3.24/hour for his minutes billed. Now let's assume that his dead to billed miles is .5:1 and he bills 20 miles for that half hour of driving. This means he has 10 dead miles or $5.75 in expenses per hour for those dead miles. This brings the driver to a profit of negative $2.51/hour. Now let's add in those 20 billable miles and his profit drops even more to negative $3.21/hour.

Yeah, totally worth it, I see your point, those billable minutes really saved his bacon.

Edit: I had originally used 25% for Detroit, apparently they are at 28%. Math corrected and it doesn't look any better for the driver...
 
Last edited:
Top