UBERING: Longer periods of sitting linked to greater risk of death

Retired Senior

Well-Known Member
My, my, my.... so Ubering 10 hours a day, 5 days a week, is now the new "cancer" threat....

https://www.consumeraffairs.com/new...g-linked-to-greater-risk-of-death-091217.html

Longer periods of sitting linked to greater risk of death
Researchers say the findings reinforce the idea that sitting is the new smoking
09/12/2017 | ConsumerAffairs | Health

By Christopher Maynard

Christopher Maynard is a New York-based writer and editor who has worked as a security guard, high school teacher, theatrical lighting designer and volunteer fireman. He is a graduate of Marist College. Read Full Bio→



Photo (c) peterruter - Fotolia
Many previous studies have addressed how bad sitting is for our health, but recent research from the University of Toronto and Columbia University Medical Center shows that the number of hours spent sitting isn't quite as important as how long each sitting period is.


Researchers have found that adults who sit for one or two hours at a time without moving have a much higher mortality rate than those who sat for just as long but over shorter periods of time. Their study is the largest to date that links objectively measured sedentary time, sedentary patterns, and mortality risk.

"We tend to think of sedentary behavior as just the sheer volume of how much we sit around each day," said lead investigator Dr. Keith Diaz. "But previous studies have suggested that sedentary patterns -- whether an individual accrues sedentary time through several short stretches or fewer long stretches of time -- may have an impact on health."

Sitting time and greater mortality risk
To gather data, the researchers asked nearly 8,000 participants to wear hip-mounted activity monitors during their waking hours over a week-long period. The devices showed that, on average, sedentary behaviors accounted for 77% of a participant’s day, the equivalent of around 12 hours.

During a prevailing four-year follow-up period, 340 of the participants died. After comparing the data, the researchers found that mortality risk was highest in individuals who had more than 13 hours of sedentary time per day. Worse yet, they found that those who had sedentary periods lasting from 60-90 minutes were twice as likely to die than those who had shorter periods of sedentary time.

The researchers say that out of all sedentary participants, those who kept their sitting time limited to 30 minutes had the lowest risk of death. The finding adds credence to many workplace recommendations for employees to get up and move around periodically.

"If you have a job or lifestyle where you have to sit for prolonged periods of time, we suggest taking a movement break every half hour," said Diaz. "This one behavior change could reduce your risk of death, although we don't yet know precisely how much activity is optimal."

Sitting is the new smoking
Dr. Monnika Safford says that the study findings also reinforce current efforts by doctors and clinicians to discourage sedentary behaviors.

"This study adds to the growing literature on how dangerous long periods of sitting are for our health, and underscores a growing awareness among clinicians and researchers that sitting really is the new smoking," she said.

"We need creative ways to ensure that we not only cut back on the total amount we sit, but also increase regular interruptions to sitting with bursts of activity.”

Two papers [1,2] connected to the study have been published in the Annals of Internal Medicine.
 

Another Uber Driver

Well-Known Member
Moderator
One reason to take a walk, ride a bicycle or do calisthenics a couple of times per week. My first choice is the bicycle. Often I will do the walk, especially on Nationals game days. I park somewhere on the street after I drop GF at the ballpark, then walk there. After the game, I have GF wait at the third base gate, walk back to the car, then pick her up on a side street across from that gate. If she does not come to the game, I ride my bicycle there.
 

UberBastid

Well-Known Member
One reason to take a walk, ride a bicycle or do calisthenics a couple of times per week. My first choice is the bicycle. Often I will do the walk, especially on Nationals game days. I park somewhere on the street after I drop GF at the ballpark, then walk there. After the game, I have GF wait at the third base gate, walk back to the car, then pick her up on a side street across from that gate. If she does not come to the game, I ride my bicycle there.
No help according to the article.
You gotta get out from behind the wheel and stand up EVERY TWO HOURS.
 

Pawtism

Well-Known Member
Moderator
No help according to the article.
You gotta get out from behind the wheel and stand up EVERY TWO HOURS.

Don't let uber hear about this, the taser under the seat set to go off every 2 hours policy doesn't sound pleasant. :p
 

Mikedamirault

Well-Known Member
Now, I have heard this many times from many different sources (one time as a selling point for electrically elevated office desks), and I am pretty sure they have good scientific data to back them up, but...

During a prevailing four-year follow-up period, 340 of the participants died.

So within a 4 year period, 340 out of 8,000 participants involved in the trial, died due to unexplained (possibly unrelated) causes

It makes no mention (unless I have missed it) as to if these participants had a pre-trial physical, if any of these participants had any pre-existing conditions, deseases or illnesses, no range of ages of the participants, it sounds like they just pulled people from the public, said "hey, wear this and report to us every week" and make their judgement based on that

Which means they could have selected somebody off the street that already had one foot in the grave (say they had cancer), died during the trial and go "see? Sitting for long periods of time is dangerous", even though the real cause of death was complications due to cancer

And to be honest, if you're in a sedentary state for a while, you would get fidgety and want to stand and move around way before the point of it becoming dangerous, otherwise you would probably just fall asleep

I really think this has more to do with the time people spend using technology in a sedentary state (watching TV, using computers, tablets or smartphones, etc.), funny how it never seems to relate to reading a book for prolonged periods of time, hmm.....
 
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