Uber tries to kick drivers who worked longer

robg77

Active Member
It's true. Uber will kick you, and hard. One time I worked longer in the DMV area, and an Uber rep came to my house. He knocked on my door late at night and kicked me right in the groin. I screamed "why?" as I lay in the fetal position. He stopped, turned around and said "Because you worked longer in the DMV area." I know I should have worked lesser, but I needed the money.
 
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elelegido

Well-Known Member
It's true. Uber will kick you, and hard. One time I worked longer in the DMV area (I know, I know I should have worked lesser, but...) and Uber kicked me. An Uber rep came to house, knocked on my door late at night and kicked me right in the groin. I screamed "why?" as I lay in the fetal position. He stopped, turned around and said "Because you worked longer in the DMV area."
:rolleyes: Next time, work shorter, or in another area.
 

tohunt4me

Well-Known Member
It's true. Uber will kick you, and hard. One time I worked longer in the DMV area (I know, I know I should have worked lesser, but...) and Uber kicked me. An Uber rep came to house, knocked on my door late at night and kicked me right in the groin. I screamed "why?" as I lay in the fetal position. He stopped, turned around and said "Because you worked longer in the DMV area."
But did he give you an Uber kitten ?
 

HHL

Active Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #7
No kitten, but he did kick my dog. So, I guess that kinda makes up for it. Don't mess with Uber!
So would you be okay, if you were full time uber driver, and you cannot pick up riders from VA and MD even you didn't involve single problem. In other words, you have to work only in DC and if you drive out of downtown you have to go back to DC.
 

Another Uber Driver

Well-Known Member
Moderator
If you mean does it log you out after twelve, thirteen or whatever hours, it might do that. The Lyft application does log you out after thirteen hours.

Many states have laws that limit the amount of time that you can spend behind the wheel of any motor vehicle, be it for commercial or private use.

The District of Columbia limits it to twelve hours in any twenty-four hour period, unless there is an unbroken eight hours rest. That is, you can drive your car from midnight to noon. After eight P.M., you may again drive your car. In addition, if you drive your car from midnight to six A.M., take a break, drive if from eight A.M. to noon, take another break then drive it from three P.M to five P.M. you are still in compliance.

The State of Maryland and the Commonwealth of Virginia limit you simply to thirteen hours in a twenty four hour period. You are legal if you drive, say six hours, take a break, drive four more, take a break, drive two more.

As things are, in the case of a private vehicle, these laws are almost unenforceable. They are on the books in case it does come out that a given driver had been driving for longer than the law permitted so that a judge can assign fault or penalties, as appropriate. Given what technology is, these days, these laws are potentially more enforceable, although, still, there are ways to get around the technology.

In the case of commercial or public vehicles for hire, the law was more enforceable. Truck, bus, cab and limousine drivers had to keep a log. To be sure, these drivers could circumvent this law by keeping double logs and other things. Many jurisdictions already have applied technology to curb driving in excess of the limit. In the District of Columbia, the technology will disable the meter once twelve hours have been reached. A driver, conceivably, could log back in with his buddy's hack licence number, so, still, there are ways to get around it.

In the case of a private vehicle for hire (TNC), right now, the only way to enforce it would be to subpoena the company records. I would not be surprised if, at some point, jurisdictions required one, or both, of the following of the TNCs:

1. The application would be required to log out the driver after the limit is reached and keep him logged out for eight (or nine) hours.

2. Any TNC driver, upon demand of a Police Officer or For-Hire Vehicle Inspector would be required to show the log on the telephone/tablet/whatever he uses to receive requests for service. As it is, a cab or limousine driver must produce a trip sheet if the Police or Harassm-ER-uh-HACK Inspector demands to see it. If he will not do it, does not have one, or has one that is incomplete, the driver is liable for a summons. In fact, in the District of Columbia, they Authorities have instructed Enforcement to over write the trip sheet violation. There is a twenty five dollar fine for not having a trip sheet. There is a twenty five dollar fine for having an improper or incomplete trip sheet. There is a one hundred dollar fine and possible suspension/revocation for failing or refusing to provide the trip sheet. Enforcement always writes the last. If you fight it, you can get it busted down to incomplete or none, as appropriate. The Administrative Law Judges in D.C, do still understand that you can not produce something that you do not have, even if you want to do so.
 
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Graham_DC

Well-Known Member
Is that true there is a rumor that Uber tries to kick drivers who worked longer in DMV area. Because of excessive number of drivers?
I've heard this rumor too.

Goes something like:
-New drivers get more pings
-Uber constantly needs/wants new drivers for whatever reason

Don't know if it's true, but best not to feed into stuff like that.
 
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HHL

Active Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #12
If you mean does it log you out after twelve, thirteen or whatever hours, it might do that. The Lyft application does log you out after thirteen hours.

Many states have laws that limit the amount of time that you can spend behind the wheel of any motor vehicle, be it for commercial or private use.

The District of Columbia limits it to twelve hours in any twenty-four hour period, unless there is an unbroken eight hours rest. That is, you can drive your car from midnight to noon. After eight P.M., you may again drive your car. In addition, if you drive your car from midnight to six A.M., take a break, drive if from eight A.M. to noon, take another break then drive it from three P.M to five P.M. you are still in compliance.

The State of Maryland and the Commonwealth of Virginia limit you simply to thirteen hours in a twenty four hour period. You are legal if you drive, say six hours, take a break, drive four more, take a break, drive two more.

As things are, in the case of a private vehicle, these laws are almost unenforceable. They are on the books in case it does come out that a given driver had been driving for longer than the law permitted so that a judge can assign fault or penalties, as appropriate. Given what technology is, these days, these laws are potentially more enforceable, although, still, there are ways to get around the technology.

In the case of commercial or public vehicles for hire, the law was more enforceable. Truck, bus, cab and limousine drivers had to keep a log. To be sure, these drivers could circumvent this law by keeping double logs and other things. Many jurisdictions already have applied technology to curb driving in excess of the limit. In the District of Columbia, the technology will disable the meter once twelve hours have been reached. A driver, conceivably, could log back in with his buddy's hack licence number, so, still, there are ways to get around it.

In the case of a private vehicle for hire (TNC), right now, the only way to enforce it would be to subpoena the company records. I would not be surprised if, at some point, jurisdictions required one, or both, of the following of the TNCs:

1. The application would be required to log out the driver after the limit is reached and keep him logged out for eight (or nine) hours.

2. Any TNC driver, upon demand of a Police Officer or For-Hire Vehicle Inspector would be required to show the log on the telephone/tablet/whatever he uses to receive requests for service. As it is, a cab or limousine driver must produce a trip sheet if the Police or Harassm-ER-uh-HACK Inspector demands to see it. If he will not do it, does not have one, or has one that is incomplete, the driver is liable for a summons. In fact, in the District of Columbia, they Authorities have instructed Enforcement to over write the trip sheet violation. There is a twenty five dollar fine for not having a trip sheet. There is a twenty five dollar fine for having an improper or incomplete trip sheet. There is a one hundred dollar fine and possible suspension/revocation for failing or refusing to provide the trip sheet. Enforcement always writes the last. If you fight it, you can get it busted down to incomplete or none, as appropriate. The Administrative Law Judges in D.C, do still understand that you can not produce something that you do not have, even if you want to do so.
Thank you so much for your time. It is so helpful :smiles:
 

HHL

Active Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #13
Well, I went uber office back today and another idiot laughed at me when I say that I am losing my earnings coz I cannot pick up in VA. Then he tried to sent me home saying like everything is looks fine now you can pick up. After I made sure and told him about background check, he was like oh I see you cannot pick up in VA (what a heck). I asked his boss and talked with him almost 20 min and he was cool guy explained everything again to me. So it seems like according to VA new law, I made more than two minor moving violations in last three years (of course I made it if it concerns last three years). At this moment I only have DC left and need to find another job. Interestingly, I received trip requests in VA using Lyft yesterday?! What a joke hmmm!??!
 

HHL

Active Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #14
I've heard this rumor too.

Goes something like:
-New drivers get more pings
-Uber constantly needs/wants new drivers for whatever reason

Don't know if it's true, but best not to feed into stuff like that.
There must be an excessive number of drivers. We can see it easily. When you look at ur rider App, and move ur pin less than a half mile we see bunch off cars laying. I mean every half miles 4-10 cars !!!
 

tamalama

Member
It's true. Uber will kick you, and hard. One time I worked longer in the DMV area, and an Uber rep came to my house. He knocked on my door late at night and kicked me right in the groin. I screamed "why?" as I lay in the fetal position. He stopped, turned around and said "Because you worked longer in the DMV area." I know I should have worked lesser, but I needed the money.
Hahahahahaha.....spit out my drink....crying laughing. Lol!
 
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