Uber + Taxes

Ubering

Well-Known Member
For those that have been driving awhile and had to do taxes, I have a question.

I have been saving all my gas receipt and car maintenance receipt (oil changes, tire changer, etc..), to write off when I have to do my taxes.

Can I do that and what else can I deduct?

Thanks
 

soupergloo

Well-Known Member
I filed this year as the first time with Uber earnings and from my understanding .. you can either use the mileage deduction OR your car expenses, but not both. I keep a mileage log and used the mileage deduction cause it ended up being more than my expenses.

I am in no way a tax expert though and got all of my advice from this forum when I was filing.
 

Uberdancer

Well-Known Member
It's advised to use the standard mileage deduction for the first year, first time ... in the next year you can itemized your deductions, expenses ... or keep using the standard mileage deduction ...

If you decide to itemize your deductions and expenses the first year, the first time, you CANNOT use the standard mileage deduction for the following years ...
 

Genini-Contractor

Active Member
auto insurance, car washes, food when driving, restaurant receipts like you talked business with potential recruits, office supplies you need with business, printer paper, printer, ink, note pad, mileage log book, pens, your city hall certificates, penalties, parking tickets (?), loss to your car as it ages with mileage increase (consult tax accountant about this one), cell phone monthly plan payments, new cell phones, vomit clean up.
 

RedoBeach

Well-Known Member
You will be better off taking the standard mileage deduction... It almost always works out better.

For those that have been driving awhile and had to do taxes, I have a question.

I have been saving all my gas receipt and car maintenance receipt (oil changes, tire changer, etc..), to write off when I have to do my taxes.

Can I do that and what else can I deduct?

Thanks
 

RedoBeach

Well-Known Member
Gemini is right, your meals while working and anytime you discuss work over a meal is deductible, but they are a separate deduction from the mileage and maintenance.

Supplies for work (all that water & candy you're buying for your pax :wink: chargers, phones, etc will go under another category of business supplies.

And then you have the deduction category where you keep track of your cell phone charges for the year (you can write off the percentage used for business).

Tolls and parking are another separate deduction.
 
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RedoBeach

Well-Known Member
It's advised to use the standard mileage deduction for the first year, first time ... in the next year you can itemized your deductions, expenses ... or keep using the standard mileage deduction ...

If you decide to itemize your deductions and expenses the first year, the first time, you CANNOT use the standard mileage deduction for the following years ...
I've used the standard mileage deduction every year for the past 10 years and it has ALWAYS been a better deduction to take than the sum my gas & maintenance for all of my vehicles. (No, I was NOT a cab driver but I had an average of 25,000 business miles/year).

It can vary from person to person, and vehicle to vehicle, but the standard deduction is the easiest, safest, and usually most beneficial to your self employment taxes.

I keep a notebook in my car and note my mileage right next to my login times for Uber Lyft. The number Uber sends you totaling your mileage at the end of the year will not include your dead miles or miles driven to pick up passengers.
 

Euius

Well-Known Member
Let me preface this post with the simple truth: You can get away with anything, so long as you don't get audited.

Now to the point: Meals are absolutely positively NOT deductible.

It's not even a question, it's quite clear. Meals are only deductible if you're travelling outside your normal area, where such an area is defined as broadly as reasonable (i.e., the entire SF Bay would qualify) and even then you can only deduct 50% of the meal.

http://quickbooks.intuit.com/r/taxes/when-can-you-write-off-meals-on-your-taxes/

Business owners can only take this deduction if they are truly out of town. In the eyes of the IRS, that means you’re outside or general area where your work is located. To qualify as a business trip, the period of time must be substantially longer than a day’s work and you need to rest or sleep while away. So unless it's exceptionally long, a day trip doesn’t qualify.
auto insurance, car washes, food when driving, restaurant receipts like you talked business with potential recruits, office supplies you need with business, printer paper, printer, ink, note pad, mileage log book, pens, your city hall certificates, penalties, parking tickets (?), loss to your car as it ages with mileage increase (consult tax accountant about this one), cell phone monthly plan payments, new cell phones, vomit clean up.
"loss to your car as it ages" is rolled into the standard mileage deduction, if you're taking that deduction you cannot separately claim depreciation.

All those "office supplies" would also be struck, as they're not required to do business as an Uber driver.

Parking tickets, or any infraction, are never EVER deductible. IRC § 162(f)

(f)Fines and penalties


No deduction shall be allowed under subsection (a) for any fine or similar penalty paid to a government for the violation of any law.

You can pro-rate a portion of your cell phone bill, but if you take 100% of it you may be face to face with an auditor trying to explain that you wouldn't have a cell phone at all if you didn't drive for Uber.

Similar with insurance, car registration fees, etc. If you would own the car anyways, you're going to be paying those fees anyways and they're not deductible. If your insurance rises because of driving for Uber, then you can deduct the increase but not 100% of the bill.

Cleaning up vomit is deductible, but then you have to recognize that Uber paying you the clean up fee is income that you have to pay taxes on.
 

RedoBeach

Well-Known Member
All those "office supplies" would also be struck, as they're not required to do business as an Uber driver.
There is no requirement per the IRS determining what is and what is not considered "office supplies" for each individual business. If you use a supply (yes, even notebooks, pen and paper for logs), and phone chargers, those items are deductible. If you purchase a dash camera, a phone, or similar high value equipment to be used specifically for the business under which they are claimed, those items are also deductible as a separate deduction for business equipment. Of course, these expenses should be within reason and actually something you would use in the course of your business, but they in fact are deductible as such.

"An expense is ordinary if it is common and accepted in your trade, business, or profession. An expense is necessary if it is appropriate and helpful to your business. An expense doesn't have to be required to be considered necessary." Your friend, the IRS

"loss to your car as it ages" is rolled into the standard mileage deduction, if you're taking that deduction you cannot separately claim depreciation.
If you own a vehicle that is used 100% of the time for business (no personal use) your entire vehicle depreciation IS deductible. Alternatively, you may use the cost of depreciation only at the percentage that vehicle is used for business. You may not use the depreciation as a separate item if you use the standard mileage deduction. Programs like Turbo tax allow you to enter both the itemized costs including depreciation and the standard mileage deduction only to determine which method will offer the largest deduction (they will calculate for you and show you the difference if both methods are entered).

. Meals are absolutely positively NOT deductible.

It's not even a question, it's quite clear. Meals are only deductible if you're travelling outside your normal area, where such an area is defined as broadly as reasonable (i.e., the entire SF Bay would qualify) and even then you can only deduct 50% of the meal.
Meals and entertainment in the course of doing business ARE in fact 50% deductible of total expense (including sales tax and tip). You DO NOT have to be traveling outside your home (or office) area for these items to be deductible as long as they are part of your normal business. Lunch with a coworker while not for the intended purpose of discussing business do not qualify. Meals purchased within the designated Department of Transportation "hours of service" are 80% deductible.

Meals, lodging and entertainment purchased for travel outside your home (or office) area (another city) are 100% deductible,
but for the purpose of driving Uber these would be rare instances.

If you choose to deduct any of the above, make sure to keep detailed records as to who you were with and matter of business discussed. (Often people will make a note on each receipt of the person they were with or if they were alone and what the meeting was for so they can remember later). You don't have to include this info when you file, but you will want to keep the record/receipts for 7 years in case of audit.

="Euius, post: 1270775, member: 57368"]. You can pro-rate a portion of your cell phone bill, but if you take 100% of it you may be face to face with an auditor trying to explain that you wouldn't have a cell phone at all if you didn't drive for Uber.
Since the phone is required as a condition of your work, it is absolutely deductible. It doesn't matter if you use your cell phone for personal use in addition to business use. The key factor is to ONLY claim the percentage of the deduction that is used for business.

"Similar with insurance, car registration fees, etc. If you would own the car anyways, you're going to be paying those fees anyways and they're not deductible. If your insurance rises because of driving for Uber, then you can deduct the increase but not 100% of the bill.
License and regulatory fees can be deducted as a business expense if the vehicle is used in the process of conducting business. If the vehicle is not strictly for business use, you can only deduct the percentage of use that is.

Be careful with accepting tax advice from anyone not licensed to do so. I am not a certified accountant but I do have 10 years experience filing taxes as they relate to business and business vehicle related expense. Business legal fees and fees related to filing taxes are also deductible. :smiles: All of the above mentioned items have specific requirements to meet deduction that can be verified with the IRS.
 

Euius

Well-Known Member
There is no requirement per the IRS determining what is and what is not considered "office supplies" for each individual business. If you use a supply (yes, even notebooks, pen and paper for logs), and phone chargers, those items are deductible. If you purchase a dash camera, a phone, or similar high value equipment to be used specifically for the business under which they are claimed, those items are also deductible as a separate deduction for business equipment. Of course, these expenses should be within reason and actually something you would use in the course of your business, but they in fact are deductible as such.
I never said phone chargers, dash camera, etc wouldn't be deductible. The quote I was replying too, and you clearly failed to read, listed printer paper and printer ink. i.e., "office supplies"

You seem awful intent on earning internet points.



If you own a vehicle that is used 100% of the time for business (no personal use) your entire vehicle depreciation IS deductible.

Irrelevant to the point I made, and you quoted: "loss to your car as it ages" is rolled into the standard mileage deduction, if you're taking that deduction you cannot separately claim depreciation


Meals and entertainment in the course of doing business ARE in fact 50% deductible of total expense (including sales tax and tip). You DO NOT have to be traveling outside your home (or office) area for these items to be deductible as long as they are part of your normal business.

You are absolutely wrong, to a level the IRS considers fraudulent and criminal. You absolutely do have to be travelling.

No competent and honest tax account would suggest an Uber driver could deduct meals.

Meals, lodging and entertainment purchased for travel outside your home (or office) area (another city) are 100% deductible,
but for the purpose of driving Uber these would be rare instances.
Lodging is 100% deductible when travelling, meals are only 50%

Since the phone is required as a condition of your work, it is absolutely deductible
. It doesn't matter if you use your cell phone for personal use in addition to business use. The key factor is to ONLY claim the percentage of the deduction that is used for business.
You literally repeated what I said: " You can pro-rate a portion of your cell phone bill"

You're awful intent on earning internet points.


License and regulatory fees can be deducted as a business expense if the vehicle is used in the process of conducting business. If the vehicle is not strictly for business use, you can only deduct the percentage of use that is.
Again. you do nothing but repeat what I said.
 

Euius

Well-Known Member
I drive always with lyft on destination filter on...almsot never get matched. Coutns as miles driven so its a double milage deduction.
Both apps on destination filter when driving for my own.
If i get a request be creative what to do next....
You are going to be fined higher than your entire financial worth if you ever get audited.

You literally just admitted to double billing the mileage deduction. That's not just an error where you pay a late fee, it's fraud and a crime.
 

Euius

Well-Known Member
Are you drunk today or just started drinking.
You are working on both apps as many do.
In uber and lyft end of year summary it clearly states amount of miles driven with app online.
43k lyft 40 k uber what not.
Clear as it gets right from uber and lyft office.
I will be at fraud if company's say i driven 43k miles but i claimed 36k. Now numbers dont add up.
Im doing them a favor for making everything match and easy.
That's simple insanity, criminal insanity. You're going to be reporting more miles than the odometer on your car shows. You're going to be reporting 100 plus miles for every hour you work.

It's fraud.

And no one audits freaking uber drivers. Everyone knows we all poor bastards
Don't count on that, particularly if your criminal activities become widespread.
 

NASCAR1991

Well-Known Member
That's simple insanity, criminal insanity. You're going to be reporting more miles than the odometer on your car shows. You're going to be reporting 100 plus miles for every hour you work.

It's fraud.



Don't count on that, particularly if your criminal activities become widespread.
I devided and its for me was 27 miles an hour.
And odometer in most cars adjustable
Thats why you never see homeless imigrants in usa. Creativity is limitless
 

NASCAR1991

Well-Known Member
Now do the math, FUberind worth it or not.
Yeah when you keep 97 pecent of income and spend 30 dollars a week on gas in a prius.
The only problem with driving is accidents and maybe car maintence after 120k miles.
But pshh...if by that time u dont own that car wtf are you doing up there.

Some of my pimps buy cars for 8k-12k.
Drive 20 k miles and sell it for a bit less. Within 1 k.
20K miles takes about 5 ..7 months.
1 k loss is basically under 200 bucks a mo with a car. Way better then most of ur rentals and financed cars.
Creativity is limitless
 

Uberdancer

Well-Known Member
That's simple insanity, criminal insanity. You're going to be reporting more miles than the odometer on your car shows. You're going to be reporting 100 plus miles for every hour you work. It's fraud. Don't count on that, particularly if your criminal activities become widespread.
Whazzamattah witchoo, man??? Don't try to change his habits. It's prolly too late. And if he gets caught, and the IRS (they're the ones who caught Al Capone when the FBI gave up), finds out, they're going to look at everything. They're going to look at this forum and see with whom he interacted and engaged in a conversation, and you will get a subpoena to appear in court as a witness ... It's best at this point to cease all engagement and communication lest you be charged with collusion of said fraud ... by egging him on ...

Let'im be ... you wouldn't want to get caught up ... he'll turn the words around and say it was you who egged him on ...


"Santino, come here. What's the matter with you? I think your brain is going soft with all that comedy you are playing with that young girl. Never tell anyone outside the Family what you are thinking again. Go on."
 

manuella

Well-Known Member
Yeah when you keep 97 pecent of income and spend 30 dollars a week on gas in a prius.
The only problem with driving is accidents and maybe car maintence after 120k miles.
But pshh...if by that time u dont own that car wtf are you doing up there.

Some of my pimps buy cars for 8k-12k.
Drive 20 k miles and sell it for a bit less. Within 1 k.
20K miles takes about 5 ..7 months.
1 k loss is basically under 200 bucks a mo with a car. Way better then most of ur rentals and financed cars.
Creativity is limitless
Mm interesting , might have to look into that
 

NASCAR1991

Well-Known Member
Whazzamattah witchoo, man??? Don't try to change his habits. It's prolly too late. And if he gets caught, and the IRS (they're the ones who caught Al Capone when the FBI gave up), finds out, they're going to look at everything. They're going to look at this forum and see with whom he interacted and engaged in a conversation, and you will get a subpoena to appear in court as a witness ... It's best at this point to cease all engagement and communication lest you be charged with collusion of said fraud ... by egging him on ...

Let'im be ... you wouldn't want to get caught up ... he'll turn the words around and say it was you who egged him on ...


"Santino, come here. What's the matter with you? I think your brain is going soft with all that comedy you are playing with that young girl. Never tell anyone outside the Family what you are thinking again. Go on."
When someone compares uber driver and al copone they either on crack or drunk.
One evades millions one in a 15 percent bracket or what ever it is a tiny portion.
You better check ur slef before u wreck ur self
 

NASCAR1991

Well-Known Member
When someone compares uber driver and al copone they either on crack or drunk.
One evades millions one in a 15 percent bracket or what ever it is a tiny portion.
You better check ur slef before u wreck ur self
No one evades taxes its called mile deduction.
 
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