Inshur

Uber ruling puts jobs at risk, says Theresa May

Gilga

Well-Known Member
_98063355_theresamay2_epa.jpg


The decision to stop Uber operating in London was "disproportionate" and has put thousands of jobs at risk, the prime minister has told the BBC.

The taxi-hailing company has been told it will lose its private hire licence, after Transport for London cited public safety and security concerns.

Uber is appealing against the decision but has apologised for its "mistakes".

Mrs May said Uber had questions to answer but the decision to stop it operating had "damaged lives".

Uber: Mayor backs talks after firm's apology

In one of a series of interviews ahead of the Conservative Party conference in Manchester next week, Mrs May told BBC London political editor Tim Donovan she blamed London Mayor Sadiq Khan - who is also the chairman of TfL.

"At a stroke of a pen, what the mayor has done is risked 40,000 jobs and of course... damaged the lives of those 3.5 million Uber users.

"Yes there are safety concerns and issues for Uber to address, but what I want to see is a level playing field between the private firms and our wonderful London taxis, our black cabs, our great national institution.

"I want to see a level playing field. I think a blanket ban is disproportionate."

'Must change'
She said: "What I think people want to see is choice."

London's transport authority, TfL, took the decision last Friday not to renew Uber's licence to operate in the capital beyond the end of September, saying the company was not fit and proper to hold a London private hire operator licence.

It cited concerns about Uber's treatment of criminal offences, medical certificates, and drivers' background checks.

_98060170_uber_epa.jpg


But London's mayor asked TfL to meet Uber's chief executive, Dara Khosrowshahi, after he said in an open letter that Uber would appeal against the city's decision but accepted the company "must change".

Mrs May was also asked about the Grenfell Tower disaster.

She said there was a need to "get to the bottom of the truth of what happened" but also make sure that, in future, when tenants complained about safety, they were listened to.

"That's why the housing minister is going around the country, listening to social housing tenants. We want to listen to them, we want to ensure that in future, when they raise their voice, their voice is heard," she said.

Sixty six people who died in the fire have now been formally identified - the total number of estimated deaths is 80, although police have said it may be lower.

In other BBC interviews, Mrs May addressed an issue referred to by Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn in his own conference speech - the UK's housing crisis, particularly for young people.

'Not quitter'
The prime minister told the BBC's South East Today programme's Helen Catt: "We need to show how we are addressing the issues that we know are of concern to people, like housing for young people. You'll be hearing from the government, in due course, obviously, how we are going to address those issues.

"We need to ensure that young people are able to build a better future for themselves and don't fear that they are going to have a worse future than their parents."

In his closing speech at this week's Labour conference, Mr Corbyn pledged to curb rents in the private sector and said any redevelopment of a housing estate under a Labour government would have to be backed by a council ballot of residents.

Conservative Party members will gather in Manchester next week for the party's annual conference, against the backdrop of Mrs May having lost her parliamentary majority in a snap election and continued questions about cabinet unity over Brexit.

Asked about her future, Mrs May told the BBC: "I've been very clear. I've said I'm not a quitter - but there's a job for this Conservative Party in government to be doing and that's what we're getting on with.

"At this Conservative Party conference, we'll be setting out very clearly how, as Conservatives in government, we will build the road for a better future for people."


Blackcabs:

Baby_Cries2.jpg


:biggrin::biggrin::biggrin:
 
Last edited:

Ubermpv

Well-Known Member
View attachment 162535

The decision to stop Uber operating in London was "disproportionate" and has put thousands of jobs at risk, the prime minister has told the BBC.

The taxi-hailing company has been told it will lose its private hire licence, after Transport for London cited public safety and security concerns.

Uber is appealing against the decision but has apologised for its "mistakes".

Mrs May said Uber had questions to answer but the decision to stop it operating had "damaged lives".

Uber: Mayor backs talks after firm's apology

In one of a series of interviews ahead of the Conservative Party conference in Manchester next week, Mrs May told BBC London political editor Tim Donovan she blamed London Mayor Sadiq Khan - who is also the chairman of TfL.

"At a stroke of a pen, what the mayor has done is risked 40,000 jobs and of course... damaged the lives of those 3.5 million Uber users.

"Yes there are safety concerns and issues for Uber to address, but what I want to see is a level playing field between the private firms and our wonderful London taxis, our black cabs, our great national institution.

"I want to see a level playing field. I think a blanket ban is disproportionate."

'Must change'
She said: "What I think people want to see is choice."

London's transport authority, TfL, took the decision last Friday not to renew Uber's licence to operate in the capital beyond the end of September, saying the company was not fit and proper to hold a London private hire operator licence.

It cited concerns about Uber's treatment of criminal offences, medical certificates, and drivers' background checks.

View attachment 162536

But London's mayor asked TfL to meet Uber's chief executive, Dara Khosrowshahi, after he said in an open letter that Uber would appeal against the city's decision but accepted the company "must change".

Mrs May was also asked about the Grenfell Tower disaster.

She said there was a need to "get to the bottom of the truth of what happened" but also make sure that, in future, when tenants complained about safety, they were listened to.

"That's why the housing minister is going around the country, listening to social housing tenants. We want to listen to them, we want to ensure that in future, when they raise their voice, their voice is heard," she said.

Sixty six people who died in the fire have now been formally identified - the total number of estimated deaths is 80, although police have said it may be lower.

In other BBC interviews, Mrs May addressed an issue referred to by Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn in his own conference speech - the UK's housing crisis, particularly for young people.

'Not quitter'
The prime minister told the BBC's South East Today programme's Helen Catt: "We need to show how we are addressing the issues that we know are of concern to people, like housing for young people. You'll be hearing from the government, in due course, obviously, how we are going to address those issues.

"We need to ensure that young people are able to build a better future for themselves and don't fear that they are going to have a worse future than their parents."

In his closing speech at this week's Labour conference, Mr Corbyn pledged to curb rents in the private sector and said any redevelopment of a housing estate under a Labour government would have to be backed by a council ballot of residents.

Conservative Party members will gather in Manchester next week for the party's annual conference, against the backdrop of Mrs May having lost her parliamentary majority in a snap election and continued questions about cabinet unity over Brexit.

Asked about her future, Mrs May told the BBC: "I've been very clear. I've said I'm not a quitter - but there's a job for this Conservative Party in government to be doing and that's what we're getting on with.

"At this Conservative Party conference, we'll be setting out very clearly how, as Conservatives in government, we will build the road for a better future for people."


Blackcabs:

View attachment 162537

:biggrin::biggrin::biggrin:
Oh dear even the prime minster you voted for at the last election ain't supporting you BC drivers. Haha your lot are the joke of the town time to give it up Hahaha.
 

Bettysmalls

Well-Known Member
Oh dear even the prime minster you voted for at the last election ain't supporting you BC drivers. Haha your lot are the joke of the town time to give it up Hahaha.
Thanks to most people voting brexit that got rid of Cameron and the rest of your mates , your where you are now because all your mates in high offic have gone .
 

Bettysmalls

Well-Known Member
Hey Betty I've got the rope you ready to hang your self now Betty??? hahah.
Typical reply from someone on the ropes license gone, ceo grovelling , even the BBC and all media are saying Uber or minicab when mentioning problems with the ph trade where as a year they always stated Taxi driver , your a bit like that Monty Python knight sketch, look it up lol
 

Ubermpv

Well-Known Member
Typical reply from someone on the ropes license gone, ceo grovelling , even the BBC and all media are saying Uber or minicab when mentioning problems with the ph trade where as a year they always stated Taxi driver , your a bit like that Monty Python knight sketch, look it up lol
Are you deluded uber isn't going anywhere even the prime minister expect uber to stay you are done you making a fool of yourself now. Give it up.
 

Bob1512

New Member
The worst thing that ever happened to private hire was uber 1970s prices,The answer is simple
Charge a decent rate and a decent minimun fare,and bring it up to 2017 prices.
And I am a private hire driver local office in the suburbs in Kent £2.20 a mile and
that is not enough really.
 

Momo11

Well-Known Member
View attachment 162535

The decision to stop Uber operating in London was "disproportionate" and has put thousands of jobs at risk, the prime minister has told the BBC.

The taxi-hailing company has been told it will lose its private hire licence, after Transport for London cited public safety and security concerns.

Uber is appealing against the decision but has apologised for its "mistakes".

Mrs May said Uber had questions to answer but the decision to stop it operating had "damaged lives".

Uber: Mayor backs talks after firm's apology

In one of a series of interviews ahead of the Conservative Party conference in Manchester next week, Mrs May told BBC London political editor Tim Donovan she blamed London Mayor Sadiq Khan - who is also the chairman of TfL.

"At a stroke of a pen, what the mayor has done is risked 40,000 jobs and of course... damaged the lives of those 3.5 million Uber users.

"Yes there are safety concerns and issues for Uber to address, but what I want to see is a level playing field between the private firms and our wonderful London taxis, our black cabs, our great national institution.

"I want to see a level playing field. I think a blanket ban is disproportionate."

'Must change'
She said: "What I think people want to see is choice."

London's transport authority, TfL, took the decision last Friday not to renew Uber's licence to operate in the capital beyond the end of September, saying the company was not fit and proper to hold a London private hire operator licence.

It cited concerns about Uber's treatment of criminal offences, medical certificates, and drivers' background checks.

View attachment 162536

But London's mayor asked TfL to meet Uber's chief executive, Dara Khosrowshahi, after he said in an open letter that Uber would appeal against the city's decision but accepted the company "must change".

Mrs May was also asked about the Grenfell Tower disaster.

She said there was a need to "get to the bottom of the truth of what happened" but also make sure that, in future, when tenants complained about safety, they were listened to.

"That's why the housing minister is going around the country, listening to social housing tenants. We want to listen to them, we want to ensure that in future, when they raise their voice, their voice is heard," she said.

Sixty six people who died in the fire have now been formally identified - the total number of estimated deaths is 80, although police have said it may be lower.

In other BBC interviews, Mrs May addressed an issue referred to by Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn in his own conference speech - the UK's housing crisis, particularly for young people.

'Not quitter'
The prime minister told the BBC's South East Today programme's Helen Catt: "We need to show how we are addressing the issues that we know are of concern to people, like housing for young people. You'll be hearing from the government, in due course, obviously, how we are going to address those issues.

"We need to ensure that young people are able to build a better future for themselves and don't fear that they are going to have a worse future than their parents."

In his closing speech at this week's Labour conference, Mr Corbyn pledged to curb rents in the private sector and said any redevelopment of a housing estate under a Labour government would have to be backed by a council ballot of residents.

Conservative Party members will gather in Manchester next week for the party's annual conference, against the backdrop of Mrs May having lost her parliamentary majority in a snap election and continued questions about cabinet unity over Brexit.

Asked about her future, Mrs May told the BBC: "I've been very clear. I've said I'm not a quitter - but there's a job for this Conservative Party in government to be doing and that's what we're getting on with.

"At this Conservative Party conference, we'll be setting out very clearly how, as Conservatives in government, we will build the road for a better future for people."


Blackcabs:

View attachment 162537

:biggrin::biggrin::biggrin:
Where you been hiding all week
At last

You remember what I said before tsunami

http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-41413290
 

Ubermpv

Well-Known Member
The worst thing that ever happened to private hire was uber 1970s prices,The answer is simple
Charge a decent rate and a decent minimun fare,and bring it up to 2017 prices.
And I am a private hire driver local office in the suburbs in Kent £2.20 a mile and
that is not enough really.
I agree uber rates are not the best but for me it's just a ends to a means. I'm soon to give up ph anyway. To do forex trading full time. Seems at long last after losing money struggling I'm starting to make head way.

But even when I do give this up I'll still support uber over the old tatty tractor cabs any day of the week. In my opinion they need to go bunch of crooks stealing from the public daily!

Where you been hiding all week
At last

You remember what I said before tsunami

http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-41413290
Why don't you post that after the 30th momo haha.
 

Bettysmalls

Well-Known Member
Are you deluded uber isn't going anywhere even the prime minister expect uber to stay you are done you making a fool of yourself now. Give it up.
Uber are just going through the motions to upset tfl and prolong their demise everyone has turned against you everyday new law suits against you plus even if you do get your license back you’ll see some massive changes, changes that Uber do not want , I’d get your hat and coat if I was you.
 

London's Finest

Well-Known Member
Oh dear even the prime minster you voted for at the last election ain't supporting you BC drivers. Haha your lot are the joke of the town time to give it up Hahaha.
Nope. Read what she actually says rather than what you think it says about BC 's.
"but what I want to see is a level playing field between the private firms and our wonderful London taxis, our black cabs, our great national institution."
At this moment I think Uber is the joke of the town, grovelling to anyone that will listen to their pathetic pleas for leniency.
Black cabs are going nowhere, of course she's worried about jobs, she's head of a government that's just posted the best employment figures in years but we have a Mayor who is Labour. Just keep your fingers crossed he can be bought.
 

Momo11

Well-Known Member
I agree uber rates are not the best but for me it's just a ends to a means. I'm soon to give up ph anyway. To do forex trading full time. Seems at long last after losing money struggling I'm starting to make head way.

But even when I do give this up I'll still support uber over the old tatty tractor cabs any day of the week. In my opinion they need to go bunch of crooks stealing from the public daily!


Why don't you post that after the 30th momo haha.
Mpv
Even my cat know that conservative are pro uber nothing new
 

Samuelpepys

Active Member
She is so weak.Screws the country with austerity then magically finds £1billion to give to northern ireland terrorists.
May has zero credibility.
Jezzas in charge...she's just keeping his seat warm.
She'll soon change her tune when the judges refuse employment appeal.
 

London's Finest

Well-Known Member
I agree uber rates are not the best but for me it's just a ends to a means. I'm soon to give up ph anyway. To do forex trading full time. Seems at long last after losing money struggling I'm starting to make head way.

But even when I do give this up I'll still support uber over the old tatty tractor cabs any day of the week. In my opinion they need to go bunch of crooks stealing from the public daily!


Why don't you post that after the 30th momo haha.
So you agree Uber rates are too low, probably chase every surge that appears and accuse BC's of being crooks.
One day, before you retire from the game, obviously earning peanuts at the moment,(pmsl) I'm hoping you'll make a sensible post, rather than a heated one reflecting your envy and jealousy.
 
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