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Uber, please share the data

Thank you, Uber, for providing me with online mileage on my last two years of tax statements. This really shows an effort on your part to be a true partner to me and my business. In fact, this unselfish sharing of data on your part has proven to be a financial life saver for me! In 2018 I drove 27,000 online miles, lowering my taxable business income by $14,715! Getting this deduction at tax time turned my low paying gig into something financially rewarding.

I remember years ago I was a bit taken back when my tax pro asked me for my mileage log. What the hell is a mileage log I thought? Maybe some kind of holiday ice cream cake you eat in the car? I had no idea what a mileage log was. “Yes” the tax pro said “a mileage log, you do know about the IRS regulations, right?” Oh boy I thought, I’m screwed now! “I’ve never been self-employed before”, I protested, “I don’t know the rules! This isn’t fair, Uber never told me this!” “Let me see what I can do”, the tax pro said.

After some research, my tax pro found a recent Tax Court Case, T.C. Memo. 2018-166, from October 2018 where the judge accepted the Uber tracked online mileage as sufficient evidence of the vehicle expense when no mileage log exists. Thank God! I now have a precedent to claim the $14,715 on my tax return based on the online mileage you kept and so kindly shared with me!

Admittedly, I was extremely upset with you Uber as I was going thru my first self-employed tax return. Why didn’t you warn me when I signed up that I would be totally on my own at tax time? Why didn’t you tell me I was self employed and responsible for my own record keeping? After calming down with a few adult beverages, I realized that you did warn me in the fine print of the contracts I signed with you, but who reads those? Maybe you felt a bit guilty and in 2017 started providing my online mileage to help me at tax time? Now I get it. This is not only a flexible easy way to earn extra money on my own terms, it’s also a business and subject to the same rules as every other business in this country.

For better or worse Uber we need each other. Just like UPS needs Amazon, I need you and your app to put customers in my vehicle. Just like Amazon needs UPS to deliver, you need me to provide the great timely service you so proudly advertise to the public. The success of our respective businesses is truly dependent on each other.

In the spirit of co-dependency, I’ve agreed to allow you access to my phone data. I know this data is important for your business analytics. In the same spirit of co-dependency I’m asking you to share this data back with me. It is great that you give me my mileage at tax time to help with my annual business return, but, as a fellow business you know that we are required to pay estimated taxes throughout the year. Also, I need the mileage data for my own business analytics, just like you.

Please continue your commitment to being a good business partner and give me access to the online mileage you’ve tracked on a daily basis. It would be great to have this info to review after each daily shift. At minimum, I need this information included in my weekly pay statements. Remember, I’ve agreed to give you this data from my phone to strengthen your business for free! A true business partner would share this data back so that both mutually dependent businesses can thrive. We are partners…right?

Check it out, here are two screenshots from the daily and weekly summaries you provide. I modified them to include an example of how to display the mileage (shown as an edit in red).

Screenshot_Daily.jpg


Screenshot_Weekly.jpg
 

Comments

Clothahump

Well-Known Member
Thank you, Uber, for providing me with online mileage on my last two years of tax statements.
You need to track your own mileage. If you rely solely on Uber's numbers, you are shorting yourself by a vast amount.

Get an app on your cellphone, like TrackMyMileage. Put in your start mileage when you hit the road and your ending mileage when you go off the air. All those miles that you drive to get to a passenger, or coming back from a long haul without a passenger, are deductible as well. Uber only counts miles when you have a rider in the car.
 

SEAL Team 5

Well-Known Member
Why didn’t you warn me when I signed up that I would be totally on my own at tax time? Why didn’t you tell me I was self employed and responsible for my own record keeping?
So by your own admission you walked into this rideshare thing completely blind. I will go out on a limb and say that you don't have a rideshare endorsement on your automobile policy
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Lissetti

Hufflepuff Honey Badger
Moderator
Author
This would be a nice option for those that don't have newer phones that can power three or four apps simultaneously. Uber, Lyft, Navigation, and a mileage tracking app. I have a new phone now but my old phone couldn't handle all this and I had to always remember to write my mileage down, which I would forget sometimes, or forget to record my miles if I took a mid day break and drove some distance to run errands.
 
I'm not sure if they still do it, but they used to send out a letter with your total Rideshare insurance premium that you paid. Since their Rideshare insurance is technically commercial insurance, the premium is tax deductible. So not only can you claim the Rideshare miles on your taxes, but you can also claim your car insurance. Not a bad gig.



Thank you, Uber, for providing me with online mileage on my last two years of tax statements. This really shows an effort on your part to be a true partner to me and my business. In fact, this unselfish sharing of data on your part has proven to be a financial life saver for me! In 2018 I drove 27,000 online miles, lowering my taxable business income by $14,715! Getting this deduction at tax time turned my low paying gig into something financially rewarding.

I remember years ago I was a bit taken back when my tax pro asked me for my mileage log. What the hell is a mileage log I thought? Maybe some kind of holiday ice cream cake you eat in the car? I had no idea what a mileage log was. “Yes” the tax pro said “a mileage log, you do know about the IRS regulations, right?” Oh boy I thought, I’m screwed now! “I’ve never been self-employed before”, I protested, “I don’t know the rules! This isn’t fair, Uber never told me this!” “Let me see what I can do”, the tax pro said.

After some research, my tax pro found a recent Tax Court Case, T.C. Memo. 2018-166, from October 2018 where the judge accepted the Uber tracked online mileage as sufficient evidence of the vehicle expense when no mileage log exists. Thank God! I now have a precedent to claim the $14,715 on my tax return based on the online mileage you kept and so kindly shared with me!

Admittedly, I was extremely upset with you Uber as I was going thru my first self-employed tax return. Why didn’t you warn me when I signed up that I would be totally on my own at tax time? Why didn’t you tell me I was self employed and responsible for my own record keeping? After calming down with a few adult beverages, I realized that you did warn me in the fine print of the contracts I signed with you, but who reads those? Maybe you felt a bit guilty and in 2017 started providing my online mileage to help me at tax time? Now I get it. This is not only a flexible easy way to earn extra money on my own terms, it’s also a business and subject to the same rules as every other business in this country.

For better or worse Uber we need each other. Just like UPS needs Amazon, I need you and your app to put customers in my vehicle. Just like Amazon needs UPS to deliver, you need me to provide the great timely service you so proudly advertise to the public. The success of our respective businesses is truly dependent on each other.

In the spirit of co-dependency, I’ve agreed to allow you access to my phone data. I know this data is important for your business analytics. In the same spirit of co-dependency I’m asking you to share this data back with me. It is great that you give me my mileage at tax time to help with my annual business return, but, as a fellow business you know that we are required to pay estimated taxes throughout the year. Also, I need the mileage data for my own business analytics, just like you.

Please continue your commitment to being a good business partner and give me access to the online mileage you’ve tracked on a daily basis. It would be great to have this info to review after each daily shift. At minimum, I need this information included in my weekly pay statements. Remember, I’ve agreed to give you this data from my phone to strengthen your business for free! A true business partner would share this data back so that both mutually dependent businesses can thrive. We are partners…right?

Check it out, here are two screenshots from the daily and weekly summaries you provide. I modified them to include an example of how to display the mileage (shown as an edit in red).

View attachment 292638

View attachment 292639
 

GreenSubaru

New Member
Estimate how many miles per dollar and use that as your tax deduction within reason. If you get audited and you haven't logged, then you can go through each ride on Uber's website. Just make sure to waste twice as much time of the auditor as you waste of yours. I recommend handwriting coordinates so you can work on your penmanship.

After Uber's fees and rideshare taxes, I gross about $0.80/mi. I do happen to log each shift, and my mileage deduction starts when I put my socks on and ends when I take them off. If I don't have a passenger; I'm driving towards them, and I'm still working. If you're doing your taxes correctly under Trump's tax reform, I can't imagine how you end up owing anything significant.
 

MarkR

Active Member
Certain off-app miles also count because you're not an employee. For example, you start your workday from home, you drive to the airport for the purpose of getting airport pickups, and once you reach the airport you go online. The miles from home to the airport count also.
Yes! Everything counts when you are a private contractor.
 

reg barclay

Well-Known Member
Moderator
Watch the miles calculated. I know when I was driving for them, then only counted miles that you had butts in seats. I was pretty sure I used total miles driven, which included times when I was on the clock, but empty.
IIRC it used to be 'on trip miles' like you said, but for the past couple of years it's been changed to 'online miles' in their yearly summary.
 

BuckleUp

Well-Known Member
Thank you, Uber, for providing me with online mileage on my last two years of tax statements. This really shows an effort on your part to be a true partner to me and my business. In fact, this unselfish sharing of data on your part has proven to be a financial life saver for me! In 2018 I drove 27,000 online miles, lowering my taxable business income by $14,715! Getting this deduction at tax time turned my low paying gig into something financially rewarding.

I remember years ago I was a bit taken back when my tax pro asked me for my mileage log. What the hell is a mileage log I thought? Maybe some kind of holiday ice cream cake you eat in the car? I had no idea what a mileage log was. “Yes” the tax pro said “a mileage log, you do know about the IRS regulations, right?” Oh boy I thought, I’m screwed now! “I’ve never been self-employed before”, I protested, “I don’t know the rules! This isn’t fair, Uber never told me this!” “Let me see what I can do”, the tax pro said.

After some research, my tax pro found a recent Tax Court Case, T.C. Memo. 2018-166, from October 2018 where the judge accepted the Uber tracked online mileage as sufficient evidence of the vehicle expense when no mileage log exists. Thank God! I now have a precedent to claim the $14,715 on my tax return based on the online mileage you kept and so kindly shared with me!

Admittedly, I was extremely upset with you Uber as I was going thru my first self-employed tax return. Why didn’t you warn me when I signed up that I would be totally on my own at tax time? Why didn’t you tell me I was self employed and responsible for my own record keeping? After calming down with a few adult beverages, I realized that you did warn me in the fine print of the contracts I signed with you, but who reads those? Maybe you felt a bit guilty and in 2017 started providing my online mileage to help me at tax time? Now I get it. This is not only a flexible easy way to earn extra money on my own terms, it’s also a business and subject to the same rules as every other business in this country.

For better or worse Uber we need each other. Just like UPS needs Amazon, I need you and your app to put customers in my vehicle. Just like Amazon needs UPS to deliver, you need me to provide the great timely service you so proudly advertise to the public. The success of our respective businesses is truly dependent on each other.

In the spirit of co-dependency, I’ve agreed to allow you access to my phone data. I know this data is important for your business analytics. In the same spirit of co-dependency I’m asking you to share this data back with me. It is great that you give me my mileage at tax time to help with my annual business return, but, as a fellow business you know that we are required to pay estimated taxes throughout the year. Also, I need the mileage data for my own business analytics, just like you.

Please continue your commitment to being a good business partner and give me access to the online mileage you’ve tracked on a daily basis. It would be great to have this info to review after each daily shift. At minimum, I need this information included in my weekly pay statements. Remember, I’ve agreed to give you this data from my phone to strengthen your business for free! A true business partner would share this data back so that both mutually dependent businesses can thrive. We are partners…right?

Check it out, here are two screenshots from the daily and weekly summaries you provide. I modified them to include an example of how to display the mileage (shown as an edit in red).

View attachment 292638

View attachment 292639
32hours for $440. Oh my god. Is this for real? You're running a car for under $10/hr. Dude.
 

Cary Grant

Well-Known Member
I have more than one car, so 100% of my miles on my business use vehicles are deductible. I also keep a daily handwritten log, because that's the ONLY log that stands up in court with nary a question about validity (been there, done that).

If you rely on GPS and an app, you will spend money to get a smaller deduction. If you don't get it, you probably never will. Technology is a crappy crutch.

My written logs always have many more miles on them than what Uber and Lyft have reported.
 

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