• UberPeople.NET - Independent community of rideshare drivers. It's FREE to be a person and enjoy all the benefits of membership. JOIN US! CLICK HERE

uber math

aparks330

Member
so as im reading over the threads i see much talk about the math behind driving with uber. and well, im curious to know how everyone calculates their earnings and such. of course everyone wants to profit, so what are some good ways you guys keep tabs of everything from gas to mileage and everything in between? (like walk me through your normal daily driving experience in regards to figuring out if you're coming out on top, etc) i mostly just want to see if what im doing is correct.

:cool:
 

turbovator

Well-Known Member
so as im reading over the threads i see much talk about the math behind driving with uber. and well, im curious to know how everyone calculates their earnings and such. of course everyone wants to profit, so what are some good ways you guys keep tabs of everything from gas to mileage and everything in between? (like walk me through your normal daily driving experience in regards to figuring out if you're coming out on top, etc) i mostly just want to see if what im doing is correct.

:cool:
The link above is a good link and sums up the TRUE bottom line of Uber driving. I give you credit for spending a little time to research the Uber scam before you jump in ass first, like %80 of them do!
 

aparks330

Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #4
okay so i read the article. here are my thoughts:

  1. i feel like it is steers towards people who want to do rideshare full time (like instead of riding a taxi fulltime they want to do uber or lyft). i have a full time job and can live comfortably on my salary. i wanted to do uber because i just needed an extra 200 bucks in my wallet every week so i can pay off some debt.
  2. while i understand that the cost of paying for repairs and such down the road is daunting, again i refer back to doing rideshare full time. doing uber for a few months is gonna rack up some mileage on my car, sure, but i dont plan on making a living this way, so my car isn't going to be dying in three months
  3. my car has great gas mileage so its really not a big deal to fill up. i did uber for three days and only had to fill up my tank once
so as i think it is a good article and very informing, i just dont think it applies to me specifically. thoughts?
 

Tx rides

Well-Known Member
okay so i read the article. here are my thoughts:

  1. i feel like it is steers towards people who want to do rideshare full time (like instead of riding a taxi fulltime they want to do uber or lyft). i have a full time job and can live comfortably on my salary. i wanted to do uber because i just needed an extra 200 bucks in my wallet every week so i can pay off some debt.
  2. while i understand that the cost of paying for repairs and such down the road is daunting, again i refer back to doing rideshare full time. doing uber for a few months is gonna rack up some mileage on my car, sure, but i dont plan on making a living this way, so my car isn't going to be dying in three months
  3. my car has great gas mileage so its really not a big deal to fill up. i did uber for three days and only had to fill up my tank once
so as i think it is a good article and very informing, i just dont think it applies to me specifically. thoughts?
If you owe money on your car, or have any net worth, be sure that you understand the gap period. If you don't have commercial/hybrid insurance During "phase 1", you only have $100k liability CONTINGENT on personal insurance. You have no comp/coll. If your policy has a livery exclusion, the only way you can make a claim against them is to lie and hope there are no witnesses to claim you were in the area as an Uber driver. You will be advised to do this by numerous members on this forum. I've disagreed with them on multiple threads so won't rehash the debate here: But please understand, your insurance company has the means and motive to discover this info and reject your claim. Furthermore, if they pay a claim and later prove you lied, that is a serious charge.

Review your insurance policy, loan agreements, etc. and make an informed decision for your own situation.
 

UberLou

Well-Known Member
so as im reading over the threads i see much talk about the math behind driving with uber. and well, im curious to know how everyone calculates their earnings and such. of course everyone wants to profit, so what are some good ways you guys keep tabs of everything from gas to mileage and everything in between? (like walk me through your normal daily driving experience in regards to figuring out if you're coming out on top, etc) i mostly just want to see if what im doing is correct.

:cool:
That is the issue, everyone calculates differently and everyone thinks their way is correct. The truth is that the drivers who are successful doing this are not on any forum. Only negative @@@@@@@@ who can't hack it come on here, and me of course :wink:
 

UberHammer

Well-Known Member
Past Sponsor
okay so i read the article. here are my thoughts:

  1. i feel like it is steers towards people who want to do rideshare full time (like instead of riding a taxi fulltime they want to do uber or lyft). i have a full time job and can live comfortably on my salary. i wanted to do uber because i just needed an extra 200 bucks in my wallet every week so i can pay off some debt.
  2. while i understand that the cost of paying for repairs and such down the road is daunting, again i refer back to doing rideshare full time. doing uber for a few months is gonna rack up some mileage on my car, sure, but i dont plan on making a living this way, so my car isn't going to be dying in three months
  3. my car has great gas mileage so its really not a big deal to fill up. i did uber for three days and only had to fill up my tank once
so as i think it is a good article and very informing, i just dont think it applies to me specifically. thoughts?
Math has no bias towards part time nor full time. It's simply a matter that you are consuming something of worth that you own. The disconnect people have with this is that they assume cost only occurs at the moment money is exchanged. The truth is the cost does not occur until the moment that good or services is consumed.

Think of it this way, back before the invention of money, if you traded a three sheep for one cow, have you lost any wealth? You had three sheep before, and you don't now, so one could conclude that the transaction cost them three sheep. But this ignores that you now have one cow that you didn't have before. So the transaction gained you a cow. So what's the end result? What did the transaction cost you? The answer is nothing. Because it was a trade. If it was a fair trade then the value of what you had before and what you have now is equal.

Now, a week later you decide to kill the cow and feed it to your family. This is the moment you experienced cost. That decision to consume the cow cost you one cow. You could also say that decision cost you three sheep, assuming trading three sheep for one cow is a fair trade. The point being here is that you don't experience cost until you consume something. You don't experience it at the moment of the trade, unless the moment of consumption and the moment of the trade are the same moment.

Back to Uber.... when you buy a full tank of gas for $40, did you just experience a cost of $40? No, you didn't, unless you consumed the tank at the moment you bought it. If you drove home and let the car sit in your driveway for a week, at the end of the week you have still not experienced a cost. Now if you decide to go do some personal shopping and consume the entire tank, that personal decision cost you a tank of gas. You can also say that decision cost you $40, and most people would say this is the correct way to account for that consumption of the tank of gas. If you decide to go do some business traveling and consume the entire tank, that business decision cost you a tank of gas. You can also say that decision cost you $40, and most people would say this is the correct way to account for that consumption of the tank of gas. Perhaps you consumed half the tank for personal decisions and half the tank for business decisions. The correct way to account for that is the consumption was $20 personal and $20 business. You can account for that $20 as a cost of business, even though the entire tank cost you $40.

The above applies not only to gas, but everything about the car. Everything on the car has a limited useful purpose. The tires only last 48,000 miles. The oil needs changed around 5000 miles. Transmission fluid needs changed, service this, service that, and even the car itself can only go so many miles before it has no more useful purpose anymore. The point being that your $25,000 car did not cost you $25,000 when you bought it. It cost you $25,000 bit by bit, piece by piece, minute by minute, mile by mile, etc, etc.... as YOU CONSUMED IT!!! Your $40 oil change did not cost you $40 when you paid the mechanic to do it. It cost you bit by bit as you consumed the useful purpose of the oil until you need another oil change. You can account for this cost on a per mile basis by simply knowing that every 5000 miles costs you $40 in oil change, so oil changes cost you $0.008 per mile. If you use the car for personal driving, it costs you $0.008 per mile as a personal cost. If you use the car for business driving, like Uber, then it costs you $0.008 per mile as a business expense. You can do this for every dollar that you trade for having a well maintained car. When you drive it, you consume it, and that's when it costs you.

Uber's executives claim that because most cars are sitting idle, their platform allows those resources to produce income at near zero costs because they already exist and are already get maintenanced, so the cost of Ubering is just the gas that gets consumed. This is a the biggest crock of shit any corporation in America has ever claimed. Everything about that car is getting consumed by Uber miles just as much as they get consumed by personal miles. If you Uber with your car, you consume your car, and everything about it, FASTER!!! If you ignore anything you spend on your car in factoring your costs of Ubering, you're very likely doing it wrong. There are very few things you can ignore in your Uber costs.

See the link in my signature for more details on this.
 
Last edited:

chevelle454

Well-Known Member
Wow a lot of negativity or bias here. My thoughts are if you want a small supplement to your income this is better than stocking shelves in a supermarket..if you want to work you turn it on. If not you don't.if you can make extra cash you stay if not you stop.. Pretty simple if you ask me. I'm semi retired so I'm giving it a try I have no interest in a 9 to 5 job or a boss ..I would imagine there are a lot more like me out here.
 

Tx rides

Well-Known Member
Wow a lot of negativity or bias here. My thoughts are if you want a small supplement to your income this is better than stocking shelves in a supermarket..if you want to work you turn it on. If not you don't.if you can make extra cash you stay if not you stop.. Pretty simple if you ask me. I'm semi retired so I'm giving it a try I have no interest in a 9 to 5 job or a boss ..I would imagine there are a lot more like me out here.
Facts are not always positive. I find that most casual drivers I've met have NO CLUE about the insurance risks, and they generally have more assets at stake, as they have regular paying jobs.
 

poopy

Well-Known Member
My thoughts are if you want a small supplement to your income this is better than stocking shelves in a supermarket... I'm giving it a try...
Ah yes...
I remember my genesis into gypsy-cabbing. OK rates -- made enough to survive. Enthusiastically honing my people and logistics skills.
I would even delay other chores, tasks, endeavors, because dammit, there's riders and surges out there!
Good times.

Soon came multiple rate cuts, inevitable bad pax scenarios, Uber's constantly changing TOS with each new CSR. Shorted pay, threatening texts and emails because I dared to use my promised option of discretion. Accelerated operating costs... eventually, reality just wouldn't go away no matter how many skewed attempts at math magic.

The painful truth of trading your hours and auto's life for top wages... well, top in a third world country.

It finally sets in.

I wish you luck, and I'll see you @ the supermarket.
:wink:
 

Another Uber Driver

Well-Known Member
Moderator
The truth is that the drivers who are successful doing this are not on any forum. Only negative @@@@@@@@ who can't hack it come on here, and me of course :wink:

Is this the new version of the old "All are queer except thee and me, and even thee's a little queer"? Do keep in mind that I am using "queer" in its original/obsolete meaning, not the meaning that it has acquired in the last fifty, or so, years.





1. Math has no bias towards part time nor full time. It's simply a matter that you are consuming something of worth that you own.

2. The above applies not only to gas, but everything about the car. Everything on the car has a limited useful purpose. The tires only last 48,000 miles. The oil needs changed around 5000 miles. Transmission fluid needs changed, service this, service that, and even the car itself can only go so many miles before it has no more useful purpose anymore. When you drive it, you consume it, and that's when it costs you.

3. Uber's executives claim that because most cars are sitting idle, their platform allows those resources to produce income at near zero costs because they already exist and are already get maintenanced, so the cost of Ubering is just the gas that gets consumed. This is a the biggest crock of shit any corporation in America has ever claimed. Everything about that car is getting consumed by Uber miles just as much as they get consumed by personal miles. If you Uber with your car, you consume your car, and everything about it, FASTER!!! If you ignore anything you spend on your car in factoring your costs of Ubering, you're very likely doing it wrong. There are very few things you can ignore in your Uber costs.

See the link in my signature for more details on this.
1. Yup, the proverbial "What he said". Even if you drive part time, only, you are putting more wear on your equipment (or "consuming", as the quoted poster puts it) than if you drove it to your regular job, only. I would add to the quoted poster's statements that transporting for compensation works a motor vehicle harder than even rush hour commuting. I drive a cab part time. Still, I spend more on it than I do on a private car and spend it more frequently. Even as a part time driver, from time-t0-time, over the service life of the vehicle, I am replacing parts most mechanics did not know existed.

2. ......again, the proverbial "what he said".........I would add, as a point of clarification, only, that the tyre for the cab costs the same one-hundred twenty dollars as the tyre for the rideshare vehicle. You pay the same forty bananas for an oil change on your rideshare vehicle that the cab driver pays for his cab. The mechanic is going to charge you the same three hundred potatoes for a brake job that he is going to charge the cab driver. You are going to be incurring these costs more frequently, as you are driving more and doing so under worse conditions than a rush hour commute. Further, once you spot a problem's developing, thou had better hie thee post haste to ye olde mechanical shoppe. You might get away with letting a developing problem go for a month or two if all that you are doing is rush hour commuting, but, try that on a vehicle used to haul for compensation and see how many tow truck bills that you will pay. Oh, and one more thing, vehicles that are used to transport for compensation do not break down at ten-fifteen in the morning on a Tuesday: marry, they prefer to break down at eight-fifteen in the evening on the Friday of a long weekend.

3. Again, "what he said". One of the places where Uber's Rocket Science fails is that it postulates that because you do not need to pay for a meter, a funny paint job, a dumb looking light on top of your vehicle, your expenses are far less than those of a cab driver. In some jurisdictions, you do not need to pay for a special licence, even, at least not Y-E-T. Some jursidictions already require special licences for driver, vehicle or both. More likely will follow as time passes. The above listed expenses occur mostly once during the service life of the taxicab, although the paint can occur twice or even three times. The licences are an annual or bi-annual expense. Other than those, you are spending the same amount of money, or, at least a similar/parallel amount, as a cab driver.

This proves, amoung other things, that the most dangerous people in any field of endeavour are those who have learned a little bit about said field and think that they know everything.
 

Another Uber Driver

Well-Known Member
Moderator
Wow a lot of negativity or bias here. My thoughts are if you want a small supplement to your income this is better than stocking shelves in a supermarket..if you want to work you turn it on. If not you don't.if you can make extra cash you stay if not you stop.. Pretty simple if you ask me. I'm semi retired so I'm giving it a try I have no interest in a 9 to 5 job or a boss ..I would imagine there are a lot more like me out here.
It is fine for a guy in your position. In fact, my cab and Uber passengers tell me that half of the UberX drivers in Cincinnati are retired high-level corporate types who have a good pension and simply want something to do. They take the money and pay bar bills or give it to their grandchildren for college, or dance classes or whatever.

For your case, you can pay the rent and grocery bills with whatever any pension or your other job might earn for you. You can use the Uber funds to buy a set of points and some octane-booster for that Chevelle---or did you go electronic and either change the heads or @@@@@@ the spark a bit?

UberX is fine if you are using it only to get a few extra bucks here and there. If you must, you can use it to generate some cash flow while you are between jobs. If you do that, you must understand that at some point, things will come due. This is why it is good for that only for about sixty, or so, days. At ninety, you might be getting away with it, but you are pushing it and it will be a bit rough for a while even after you return to work. Anything beyond ninety days is guaranteed trouble.

What is happening with many of these drivers here is that they have not been successful in finding another job. Even more drank the TNC Kool-Aid and left their jobs. They have learned the reality, but the former employer will not accept them again. Yet others are doing this part-time, but they , too, drank the TNC Kool-Aid and learned that the proverbial bucks ain't so big.
 

itsablackmarket

Well-Known Member
It is fine for a guy in your position. In fact, my cab and Uber passengers tell me that half of the UberX drivers in Cincinnati are retired high-level corporate types who have a good pension and simply want something to do. They take the money and pay bar bills or give it to their grandchildren for college, or dance classes or whatever.

For your case, you can pay the rent and grocery bills with whatever any pension or your other job might earn for you. You can use the Uber funds to buy a set of points and some octane-booster for that Chevelle---or did you go electronic and either change the heads or @@@@@@ the spark a bit?

UberX is fine if you are using it only to get a few extra bucks here and there. If you must, you can use it to generate some cash flow while you are between jobs. If you do that, you must understand that at some point, things will come due. This is why it is good for that only for about sixty, or so, days. At ninety, you might be getting away with it, but you are pushing it and it will be a bit rough for a while even after you return to work. Anything beyond ninety days is guaranteed trouble.

What is happening with many of these drivers here is that they have not been successful in finding another job. Even more drank the TNC Kool-Aid and left their jobs. They have learned the reality, but the former employer will not accept them again. Yet others are doing this part-time, but they , too, drank the TNC Kool-Aid and learned that the proverbial bucks ain't so big.
They take the money and wipe their ass with it, you mean. They don't need money. They need something money can't buy.. friends/a life/a purpose.
 

Another Uber Driver

Well-Known Member
Moderator
^^^^^I do not disagree. They might not use it for music paper, but they do not need it, or, they do not need that much of it.

For me, as I do it only enough to stay in the game, it is allright. I take the few bucks, put it into the bank and pay a bill, or two with it. This is one game in which I can afford to stay in hopes that it will get better. Unlike the average gambler, who stays in the game hoping that his luck will change, I do not lose my shirt doing this. I do not make big bucks, but I do come out a little ahead. I choose my rideshare driving times when it is slow for the cab. If I am not going to make any money hacking, but I still need or want a few bucks, it makes more sense to leave the cab parked and take out the UberXmobile, as I will do slightly better with it. As a rule, there is more money in the cab, but, there are the slow periods, such as now, when Kongriss is 0-W-T. After Labour Day, the UberXmobile will stay mostly parked. In August, or, the week between Christmas and New Year's (if I am in town, which ain't often), I do UberX more. Other times, I do it less.
 

UberHammer

Well-Known Member
Past Sponsor
Wow a lot of negativity or bias here. My thoughts are if you want a small supplement to your income this is better than stocking shelves in a supermarket..if you want to work you turn it on. If not you don't.if you can make extra cash you stay if not you stop.. Pretty simple if you ask me. I'm semi retired so I'm giving it a try I have no interest in a 9 to 5 job or a boss ..I would imagine there are a lot more like me out here.
Uber is perfect for those who want a small supplement to their income. The key word being "small". Those who think Uber is a lot of income are doing something wrong in their math, especially in markets where the rates are sub-$1 and never surge.
 

aparks330

Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #20
i mean i literally said that i was using uber as a means for a small amount of extra money and still people are posting on here about the long term awfulness lol. as stated before, i have a full time job. i work overnight and committing to yet another part time job at another business at the grocery store or something will make me depressed beyond all hell because im so exhausted after my long shifts and screw having another boss and schedule. with this pay period ending and the total hours i was on the road, minus gas i made about 13 dollars an hour. that money is now going directly to a credit card i owe money on and ONWARD to the next week until this debt is cleared. this is how im doing it. again, thoughts are welcomed, but read what im saying first ;D
 
Top