Uber/Lyft Information Availability

Hi All--

I'm doing some research into Lyft and Uber, and I want to make sure I correctly understand what information is available to passengers and drivers, and when. If you are interested in helping out, can you take a look at the chart below and let me know if it is all correct?

upload_2018-3-13_12-50-8.png
 

Attachments

JimKE

Well-Known Member
I believe your information is accurate with the following exceptions:
  • Estimated trip duration is not available to drivers, or at least not in the form your chart suggests.
    • Both Uber and Lyft now give "Long ride notifcations" (e.g. "45+ minute Long Trip") during the ride request stage (before accepting match), but no mileage or direction of travel is disclosed.
    • But for regular rides, no trip duration information is given, except by the GPS system en route.
  • With both companies, the estimated drive time to the pickup location is given with the ride request (before accepting match). These can be accurate, or not so much. With Lyft, in particular, they can be inaccurate -- probably to try to conceal the long drive to pickup.
  • Passenger "names" given are whatever the rider chose to enter. Could be a nickname, something stupid, or just about anything. Also, the "names" given are those of the account holder, who may not be the actual rider.
    • TMI is often not a good thing. Especially with Lyft, stupid names/photos often cause non-acceptances. You may think you're really cool, but I don't want something like that in my car!
  • Passenger destination is visible with Lyft upon arrival at the pickup...if you know where to look. It is NOT available with Uber until the ride is actually started.
  • Phone calls between riders and drivers are possible with both companies. Very helpful to fine-tune pickups, etc. Uber also provides the capability to text. Important privacy note: ALL driver-rider communications with both companies are routed through the TNC, so no driver and no rider ever has the other's true telephone number.
  • Photo of driver's vehicle. I believe both companies provide a photo of the driver's vehicle after matching.
 
Last edited:

reg barclay

Well-Known Member
Moderator
Hi All--

I'm doing some research into Lyft and Uber, and I want to make sure I correctly understand what information is available to passengers and drivers, and when. If you are interested in helping out, can you take a look at the chart below and let me know if it is all correct?

View attachment 213289
Passenger photo is not a given with Lyft, but if they have one you will see it before accepting. I'm not sure if Uber riders can post a pic of themselves or not.

(At least in my market and on my Android phone) I only see the exact Uber pick up location before accepting if I have another app open and a notification tab appears with the ping info, otherwise if I have my Uber app at the front, then all I see is the location on the map but not the street address. With Lyft I see both street address and map location either way.

As for estimated trip duration. The only info I get from both apps is if it is estimated to be over 45 minutes or not.
 

Julescase

Well-Known Member
Drivers don't receive a rider's photo on Uber. Passengers don't have a photo included in their Uber account like they do on Lyft. At least not in the US.

Good luck!!
 

MHR

Well-Known Member
Moderator
Pax photos on Lyft are fairly pointless as they can use any pic they choose for their profile.

I did read somewhere (maybe on the forum) that Uber encourages pax to use a profile pic "to help the driver" and that there is also code in the app to show the pic but it's not used.
 

SuzeCB

Well-Known Member
Pax photos on Lyft are fairly pointless as they can use any pic they choose for their profile.

I did read somewhere (maybe on the forum) that Uber encourages pax to use a profile pic "to help the driver" and that there is also code in the app to show the pic but it's not used.
Rider pics are pointless because both companies allow account holders to order rides for other people.
 

Kodyhead

Well-Known Member
Rider pics are pointless because both companies allow account holders to order rides for other people.
Not only that half the time it's a picture of a couple, can't identify them with the terrible pic anyway, or it's a drawing of a future tramp stamp tattoo

Also you can see class before accepting, but can also see if they got upgraded to a higher level.
 

unPat

Well-Known Member
Hi All--

I'm doing some research into Lyft and Uber, and I want to make sure I correctly understand what information is available to passengers and drivers, and when. If you are interested in helping out, can you take a look at the chart below and let me know if it is all correct?

View attachment 213289
If you are rea
Hi All--

I'm doing some research into Lyft and Uber, and I want to make sure I correctly understand what information is available to passengers and drivers, and when. If you are interested in helping out, can you take a look at the chart below and let me know if it is all correct?

View attachment 213289
Are we getting a $10 amazon gift card like the last survey ? I am tired of being used and experimented for just being a uber driver.
 

Mista T

Well-Known Member
Author
How hard would it be to try and verify those things by actually taking a few rides and asking a few drivers to show what they can and cannot see?

Make sure to tip the cooperative drivers more than normal.
 

JimKE

Well-Known Member
How hard would it be to try and verify those things by actually taking a few rides and asking a few drivers to show what they can and cannot see?
"Hard" is the operative word here. "Hard" is a four-letter word to researchers!

Most research goes something like this:
  • Somebody is looking for "research" to prove a certain point. They are not seeking information; they are looking for support for their point of view and will not pay for anything else.
  • The "researcher" is selected based on their known bias in favor of the payee's point of view.
  • In research, the easy way is the good way -- for example, posting a question on a discussion group. Another easy way is to read similar previous studies that reached the conclusion the payee wants, and then paraphrase them. Give plagiarism credit appropriately to make you research look authentic, and to avoid lawsuits.
  • Submit
  • Deposit the check.
The above is why most research is so suspect.

It's also why, for example, "researchers" still talk about Uber's "25% commission" and other totally outdated concepts. :rolleyes: They haven't tried the actual product, or spoken to any actual drivers or pax. They've just done "research."
 

Pawtism

Well-Known Member
Moderator
"Hard" is the operative word here. "Hard" is a four-letter word to researchers!

Most research goes something like this:
  • Somebody is looking for "research" to prove a certain point. They are not seeking information; they are looking for support for their point of view and will not pay for anything else.
  • The "researcher" is selected based on their known bias in favor of the payee's point of view.
  • In research, the easy way is the good way -- for example, posting a question on a discussion group. Another easy way is to read similar previous studies that reached the conclusion the payee wants, and then paraphrase them. Give plagiarism credit appropriately to make you research look authentic, and to avoid lawsuits.
  • Submit
  • Deposit the check.
The above is why most research is so suspect.

It's also why, for example, "researchers" still talk about Uber's "25% commission" and other totally outdated concepts. :rolleyes: They haven't tried the actual product, or spoken to any actual drivers or pax. They've just done "research."
Why pay for trips and tips when they can just ask us for free. :wink: I mean, yeah, they're kinda lazy, but you also have to admire the wisdom of it. Work smarter, not harder I always say. :smiles:
 
Top