Uber Labor Policies Scrutinized by NLRB

chi1cabby

Well-Known Member
http://m.therecorder.com/#/article/..._twitter&_almReferrer=https://t.co/4ZbiFMGhiQ

SAN FRANCISCO
The battle over whether Uber Technologies Inc. drivers are employees or independent contractors has a new front.

Lawyers for the National Labor Relations Board on Monday asked a federal judge in San Francisco to force Uber to hand over documents to help the agency determine whether drivers should be considered employees under federal labor law.

The request from the agency charged with investigating unfair labor practices comes as a result of charges brought by a handful of individual Uber drivers who allege that the company violated their rights to organize and be free from retaliation.

In Monday's filing, the agency's lawyers write that Uber's alleged conduct would only violate the National Labor Relations Act if the drivers meet the legal definition of employees. With Uber maintaining that all drivers are independent contractors, the NLRB lawyers contend that classification of the drivers is a "threshold issue." The company has so far refused to comply with a pair of subpoenas asking for documents and information, the agency states.

Among other information, the subpoena seeks details on Uber's application process, its categories of drivers, its minimum requirements, its training, its rating system and its payment processes.

The NLRB filing includes letters written in January by Uber's lawyer, Robert Hulteng of Littler Mendelson. Hulteng wrote that the NLRB is only entitled to information related to the individuals who filed charges.

An Uber spokesperson said Tuesday that the company is working with the NLRB "to provide the information and documents necessary to evaluate the claims of these individuals."

Contact the reporter at [email protected].
 

Uber-Doober

Well-Known Member
http://m.therecorder.com/#/article/1202751116839/Uber-Labor-Policies-Scrutinized-by-NLRB?cmp=share_twitter&_almReferrer=https://t.co/4ZbiFMGhiQ

SAN FRANCISCO
The battle over whether Uber Technologies Inc. drivers are employees or independent contractors has a new front.

Lawyers for the National Labor Relations Board on Monday asked a federal judge in San Francisco to force Uber to hand over documents to help the agency determine whether drivers should be considered employees under federal labor law.

The request from the agency charged with investigating unfair labor practices comes as a result of charges brought by a handful of individual Uber drivers who allege that the company violated their rights to organize and be free from retaliation.

In Monday's filing, the agency's lawyers write that Uber's alleged conduct would only violate the National Labor Relations Act if the drivers meet the legal definition of employees. With Uber maintaining that all drivers are independent contractors, the NLRB lawyers contend that classification of the drivers is a "threshold issue." The company has so far refused to comply with a pair of subpoenas asking for documents and information, the agency states.

Among other information, the subpoena seeks details on Uber's application process, its categories of drivers, its minimum requirements, its training, its rating system and its payment processes.

The NLRB filing includes letters written in January by Uber's lawyer, Robert Hulteng of Littler Mendelson. Hulteng wrote that the NLRB is only entitled to information related to the individuals who filed charges.

An Uber spokesperson said Tuesday that the company is working with the NLRB "to provide the information and documents necessary to evaluate the claims of these individuals."

Contact the reporter at [email protected].
^^^
You know.... I've said this before time and time again, and that is that if Uber had just kept the rates where they originally were, they would have avoided all the hard feelings with the "partners" and everybody would have been happy.
Except for the cab companies.
Uber would have clobbered them with arrival times alone.
Like here in Vegas, you're lucky if you can get a cab in between one to two hours.... they're all clustered around the airport or the hotels.... even the companies that are geo-fenced for a portion of their cabs.
Like the first time that I used Uber, last year to go to SEMA where if you don't get there at 7:30 AM or earlier, there's no place to park within two miles.... so I took Uber and it got here in 8 minutes if I remember correctly.
Even though the driver couldn't find the Uber/Lyft drop off point and it took another ten minutes, who cares?
Instead of it being 45 bux like the year before, it was $28 I think.... and that was before they lowered the rates.
 

oneubersheep

Active Member
It scares me that they can reject subpoenas from the federal government. They are badically ssying they write their own laws. Words cant describe my feelings right now.
 

Casuale Haberdasher

Well-Known Member
http://m.therecorder.com/#/article/1202751116839/Uber-Labor-Policies-Scrutinized-by-NLRB?cmp=share_twitter&_almReferrer=https://t.co/4ZbiFMGhiQ

SAN FRANCISCO
The battle over whether Uber Technologies Inc. drivers are employees or independent contractors has a new front.

Lawyers for the National Labor Relations Board on Monday asked a federal judge in San Francisco to force Uber to hand over documents to help the agency determine whether drivers should be considered employees under federal labor law.

The request from the agency charged with investigating unfair labor practices comes as a result of charges brought by a handful of individual Uber drivers who allege that the company violated their rights to organize and be free from retaliation.

In Monday's filing, the agency's lawyers write that Uber's alleged conduct would only violate the National Labor Relations Act if the drivers meet the legal definition of employees. With Uber maintaining that all drivers are independent contractors, the NLRB lawyers contend that classification of the drivers is a "threshold issue." The company has so far refused to comply with a pair of subpoenas asking for documents and information, the agency states.

Among other information, the subpoena seeks details on Uber's application process, its categories of drivers, its minimum requirements, its training, its rating system and its payment processes.

The NLRB filing includes letters written in January by Uber's lawyer, Robert Hulteng of Littler Mendelson. Hulteng wrote that the NLRB is only entitled to information related to the individuals who filed charges.

An Uber spokesperson said Tuesday that the company is working with the NLRB "to provide the information and documents necessary to evaluate the claims of these individuals."

Contact the reporter at [email protected].
POST # 1/chi1cabby: Bostonian Bison
Thanks You for this
Hyperlinked The Recorder.com Article
of Interest to ANY A-B TNC-watchers
who have an Interest in "The Little Guy",
along with the Assistance of the NLRB,
achieving JUSTICE de$pite the Force$
of Evil #[F]Uber and its NeverEnding
HorrorShow of Creepy-Looking "Part-
ner$-in-Criminality-Enabled".

MentoringBison: Scarier than Boogeyman
☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ #Evil Emil Michael !
 

Casuale Haberdasher

Well-Known Member
Littler is the leading law firm in the "union avoidance industry." Here is a clip from the "Labor Management" section. Scroll down a little and J. Kronberg mentions the close relations with the NLRB.

http://www.littler.com/labor-management-relations

Here is the guy mentioned in the article: R. Hulteng

http://www.littler.com/lawyer-search?name_last=hulteng
POST # 4/Ca$h4: Bostonian Bison
Thanks You for this
Hyperlink "Double Shot" from the
Littler.com Website. Since they
"Poo-poo" efforts at Unionization
THEIR name SHOULD be "Belittler"!
 

Greguzzi

Well-Known Member
You know, I hate Uber. But I think I hate the sham government shakedown racket with the initials "NLRB" more.

This is a case of "when @@@@@@@@ collide," and all sane people hope that both sides lose.
 
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