Uber is better than taxi

Edddelos

Member
Uber is better than taxi, actually depends on driver. A driver can drive a Cadillac and still be rude to customers.

So why is uber better than taxi.

- Uber cars are usually newer and in better condition...usually.
**Compared to most taxis that are 90% of the time the old Crown Victoria, decommissioned police cars. They get those because they are cheap and more importantly hold up to car crashes better and parts are so abundant they come cheap.
- Uber cars are for the most part unmarked, unless it's ubertaxi.
A lot of riders like being chauffeured in an unmarked car. Again taxis have decals all over and usually have the worst paint job, just to have the "company color scheme".
- Uber cars are usually cleaner inside and odor free. Actually depends on cleanliness of the driver, but majority take pride in their own car. A person who drives their own car will tend to keep their own car clean than the company rented taxi.

*This is from my own experience and my own market, your market may be different.
 

UberMeansSuper

Well-Known Member
It's also better for both parties involved!
  • The customer pays dirt-cheap prices for a ride in a shiny car. They also don't have to tip and arbitrarily rate us for things not related to our service and vehicle condition, such as how they are feeling today, how good or bad their thought was as they are selecting the appropriate star rating, how we look, how we sound, how Uber is surging right now, etc. This is perhaps the best part of Uber.
  • The driver is paid even less than dirt, sometimes running in the red. This is an incentive for your driver to find another job to supplement their "earnings" and find ways to cater to you in hopes you don't rate him inadequately and thus cause his/her deactivation. This includes things like water, gum, candy, energy bars, energy drinks, a full lunch buffet and salad bar, popcorn, assorted fruits, ranch dip, chips, freshly-made guacamole, freshly-made salsa, etc.
 

20yearsdriving

Well-Known Member
It's also better for both parties involved!
  • The customer pays dirt-cheap prices for a ride in a shiny car. They also don't have to tip and arbitrarily rate us for things not related to our service and vehicle condition, such as how they are feeling today, how good or bad their thought was as they are selecting the appropriate star rating, how we look, how we sound, how Uber is surging right now, etc. This is perhaps the best part of Uber.
  • The driver is paid even less than dirt, sometimes running in the red. This is an incentive for your driver to find another job to supplement their "earnings" and find ways to cater to you in hopes you don't rate him inadequately and thus cause his/her deactivation. This includes things like water, gum, candy, energy bars, energy drinks, a full lunch buffet and salad bar, popcorn, assorted fruits, ranch dip, chips, freshly-made guacamole, freshly-made salsa, etc.
Bingo !!!!!
 

Another Uber Driver

Well-Known Member
Moderator
Uber is better than taxi, actually depends on driver. A driver can drive a Cadillac and still be rude to customers.

So why is uber better than taxi.

- Uber cars are usually newer and in better condition...usually.

**Compared to most taxis that are 90% of the time the old Crown Victoria, decommissioned police cars. They get those because they are cheap and more importantly hold up to car crashes better and parts are so abundant they come cheap.

- Uber cars are for the most part unmarked, unless it's ubertaxi.
A lot of riders like being chauffeured in an unmarked car. Again taxis have decals all over and usually have the worst paint job, just to have the "company color scheme".

- Uber cars are usually cleaner inside and odor free. Actually depends on cleanliness of the driver, but majority take pride in their own car.

A person who drives their own car will tend to keep their own car clean than the company rented taxi.

*This is from my own experience and my own market, your market may be different.

You stated "usually". Thus, you can not use your first sentence as an argument to support your assertion. Further, to hear my customers tell it, the alleged "usually" is becoming less and less "usual" due to the handsome renumeration that Uber drivers receive.

The Crown Victorias are disappearing as they age. What is wrong with using a strong vehicle that has available parts for this kind of service? One of the reasons that users are complaining is that certain vehicles are proving unsuitable for his type of service. As Uber compensates its drivers with such a princely sum, these drivers are unable to afford the repairs. What Uber's Rocket Scientists, its shills and people with a brown, stylized "U" on the nose fail to comprehend is that while the TNC vehicles do not need a special light, paint job and meter, they do still need repairs that cost the same per model regardless of the use of the vehicle. The drivers are starting to learn about the cost of replacing parts that most mechanics never knew existed.

Most riders simply want a ride. While for some, a shiny Cadillac limousine may be nice, the object of the game is to get to where you want to go in a reasonable time. Thus, most people do not care what it looks like. They do care that it is mechanically sound and clean, though.

Not any more, are Uber cars usually cleaner inside and odor-free, not to hear my customers tell it. When first I heard this, I would tell these people to come back to me in three years with their cars' cloth covered seats, carpeted floors and the cars' being driven in foul weather over lousy streets and under horrid conditions and tell me all about it. A little more than a year later, people have been coming back to tell me all about it. I am hearing the same complaint about UberXmobiles that I have heard about cabs for years. To read the posts on this forum, every weekend, every UBerX driver has at least one customer who ralphs or dirties himself in the car. The smell of that does not come out of cloth seats and carpeted floors. There is a reason that cabs have rubber floors and vinyl seats.

That is true. As you appended at the end, you are making statements about your market. In the District of Columbia, most of the drivers still own their vehicles. The D.C. Gubbamint is working hard to change that, but for now, it obtains. In the suburbs, most of the drivers do rent. I own my cab, but have rented. It can be extremely difficult for a rental driver to get an owner to fix something. However, when the vehicle breaks down repeatedly due to an owner's cutting corners, the owner still has his hand out on Rent Day, despite the driver's inability to work because the thing was in the shop all week.
 

Edddelos

Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #8
You stated "usually". Thus, you can not use your first sentence as an argument to support your assertion. Further, to hear my customers tell it, the alleged "usually" is becoming less and less "usual" due to the handsome renumeration that Uber drivers receive.

The Crown Victorias are disappearing as they age. What is wrong with using a strong vehicle that has available parts for this kind of service? One of the reasons that users are complaining is that certain vehicles are proving unsuitable for his type of service. As Uber compensates its drivers with such a princely sum, these drivers are unable to afford the repairs. What Uber's Rocket Scientists, its shills and people with a brown, stylized "U" on the nose fail to comprehend is that while the TNC vehicles do not need a special light, paint job and meter, they do still need repairs that cost the same per model regardless of the use of the vehicle. The drivers are starting to learn about the cost of replacing parts that most mechanics never knew existed.

Most riders simply want a ride. While for some, a shiny Cadillac limousine may be nice, the object of the game is to get to where you want to go in a reasonable time. Thus, most people do not care what it looks like. They do care that it is mechanically sound and clean, though.

Not any more, are Uber cars usually cleaner inside and odor-free, not to hear my customers tell it. When first I heard this, I would tell these people to come back to me in three years with their cars' cloth covered seats, carpeted floors and the cars' being driven in foul weather over lousy streets and under horrid conditions and tell me all about it. A little more than a year later, people have been coming back to tell me all about it. I am hearing the same complaint about UberXmobiles that I have heard about cabs for years. To read the posts on this forum, every weekend, every UBerX driver has at least one customer who ralphs or dirties himself in the car. The smell of that does not come out of cloth seats and carpeted floors. There is a reason that cabs have rubber floors and vinyl seats.

That is true. As you appended at the end, you are making statements about your market. In the District of Columbia, most of the drivers still own their vehicles. The D.C. Gubbamint is working hard to change that, but for now, it obtains. In the suburbs, most of the drivers do rent. I own my cab, but have rented. It can be extremely difficult for a rental driver to get an owner to fix something. However, when the vehicle breaks down repeatedly due to an owner's cutting corners, the owner still has his hand out on Rent Day, despite the driver's inability to work because the thing was in the shop all week.
  • Yes I stated usually, which means more often or majority of time. This was said in comparison to taxis, how old are these Crown Victorias? Not all uber drivers have a new model car, but they are "newer" than the majority of taxis.
  • Nothing is wrong with a strong vehicle that has an abundance of used parts. This was used as a reason why they have or had those kinds of cars, so it was mentioned as a strong point.
For you drivers drivers that drive foreign made cars, your cars are only dependable not "strong."
  • Most riders simply want a ride, yes most....60%. Its the other 40% you have to worry about, because they may have a "stronger" standard.
  • Most customers don't mind what the car looks like, they do care though. The customer does not desire to enter a car that looks like a "hoopty", and looks like its on its last leg, they want a car that looks like it will get them to their final destination.
  • I actually like the rubber floors.
Since you say you have rented, do you disagree that the majority of rentals looks like a "hoopty?"

I do drive the D.C. metropolitan area. And for you readers out there....their are three different jurisdictions (Virginia, Maryland, and D.C.) that serve or "share"the same customer base.
 
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hanging in there

Well-Known Member
  • Yes I stated usually, which means more often or majority of time. This was said in comparison to taxis, how old are these Crown Victorias? Not all uber drivers have a new model car, but they are "newer" than the majority of taxis.
  • Nothing is wrong with a strong vehicle that has an abundance of used parts. This was used as a reason why they have or had those kinds of cars, so it was mentioned as a strong point.
For you drivers drivers that drive foreign made cars, your cars are only dependable not "strong."
  • Most riders simply want a ride, yes most....60%. Its the other 40% you have to worry about, because they may have a "stronger" standard.
  • Most customers don't mind what the car looks like, they do care though. The customer does not desire to enter a car that looks like a "hoopty", and looks like its on its last leg, they want a car that looks like it will get them to their final destination.
  • I actually like the rubber floors.
Since you say you have rented, do you disagree that the majority of rentals looks like a "hoopty?"

I do drive the D.C. metropolitan area. And for you readers out there....their are three different jurisdictions (Virginia, Maryland, and D.C.) that serve or "share"the same customer base.
In my market (Orange County CA) the majority of cabs at this point are no longer Crown Vics but rather Priuses. That means that the cab vs Uber experience is one step closer to parity, from a mechanical car standpoint. The second most common taxi vehicle in my market is a minivan, again, similar to most of the XL Ubers.

Upkeep, cleanliness, smells, yes I agree owner/operator taxi drivers are going to be keeping it in a more "Uber-like" state than a leased taxi driver. However, eventually, as the time and miles and # of pax add up, as a previous poster has stated, you will be quickly reaching parity with your friendly taxi driver in terms of wear and tear, stains, broken moldings/accessories, smells, mechanical issues etc. Uber driving does not magically exempt you from the realities of driving for a living.

In my particular case, I am an owner/operator. My taxi customers get the same me, (whether that's a good or bad thing is open to debate), but I will say that I speak English as my first language, do not have phone conversations concurrent with their trip, am at least pleasant if not nice and helpful, do not smell of curry or dung, dress professionally and shower daily (ummm, most of the time), always cheerfully accept credit cards and never have a "broken" CC machine, and I drive a newer minivan with half the miles compared to my Uber minivan. I keep both vehicles in top shape in all ways as much as possible.
 

20yearsdriving

Well-Known Member
  • Yes I stated usually, which means more often or majority of time. This was said in comparison to taxis, how old are these Crown Victorias? Not all uber drivers have a new model car, but they are "newer" than the majority of taxis.
  • Nothing is wrong with a strong vehicle that has an abundance of used parts. This was used as a reason why they have or had those kinds of cars, so it was mentioned as a strong point.
For you drivers drivers that drive foreign made cars, your cars are only dependable not "strong."
  • Most riders simply want a ride, yes most....60%. Its the other 40% you have to worry about, because they may have a "stronger" standard.
  • Most customers don't mind what the car looks like, they do care though. The customer does not desire to enter a car that looks like a "hoopty", and looks like its on its last leg, they want a car that looks like it will get them to their final destination.
  • I actually like the rubber floors.
Since you say you have rented, do you disagree that the majority of rentals looks like a "hoopty?"

I do drive the D.C. metropolitan area. And for you readers out there....their are three different jurisdictions (Virginia, Maryland, and D.C.) that serve or "share"the same customer base.
Uber X rider "standard" = 4 bucks
 

Edddelos

Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #11
There is a reason that cabs have rubber floors and vinyl seats.
In my market (Orange County CA) the majority of cabs at this point are no longer Crown Vics but rather Priuses. That means that the cab vs Uber experience is one step closer to parity, from a mechanical car standpoint. The second most common taxi vehicle in my market is a minivan, again, similar to most of the XL Ubers.

Upkeep, cleanliness, smells, yes I agree owner/operator taxi drivers are going to be keeping it in a more "Uber-like" state than a leased taxi driver. However, eventually, as the time and miles and # of pax add up, as a previous poster has stated, you will be quickly reaching parity with your friendly taxi driver in terms of wear and tear, stains, broken moldings/accessories, smells, mechanical issues etc. Uber driving does not magically exempt you from the realities of driving for a living.

In my particular case, I am an owner/operator. My taxi customers get the same me, (whether that's a good or bad thing is open to debate), but I will say that I speak English as my first language, do not have phone conversations concurrent with their trip, am at least pleasant if not nice and helpful, do not smell of curry or dung, dress professionally and shower daily (ummm, most of the time), always cheerfully accept credit cards and never have a "broken" CC machine, and I drive a newer minivan with half the miles compared to my Uber minivan. I keep both vehicles in top shape in all ways as much as possible.
You sir is what I like to call a professional driver.

I drive full time, if in three years I am still driving for I would like to buy a new car again. The longer you keep a car in this industry the more likelihood the parts on it are going to go bad, thats the bad side of this type of job.

If the interior starts to "show" signs of wear, go to the junk yard and buy replacements that are in better condition or you can buy new ones. Cost effective and maintains a "clean" look.
 
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Bolympia

Active Member
If the interior starts to "show" signs of wear, go to the junk yard and buy replacements that are in better condition or you can buy new ones. Cost effective and maintains a "clean" look.
The problem is that's is a hassle. And if what I read on this forum is to be believed, Uber doesn't pay enough to justify the hassle. The 2nd biggest reason that I choose to drove taxi over Uber (the 1st being the star ratings) is that I get to use somebody else's car. And if you're working class buying a new car once every 3 years is unsustainable as well.
 

Edddelos

Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #13
The problem is that's is a hassle. And if what I read on this forum is to be believed, Uber doesn't pay enough to justify the hassle. The 2nd biggest reason that I choose to drove taxi over Uber (the 1st being the star ratings) is that I get to use somebody else's car. And if you're working class buying a new car once every 3 years is unsustainable as well.
I agree it is a hassle, but I do want to keep my car looking somewhat nice.
 

Rex8976

Well-Known Member
Uber is better than taxi, actually depends on driver. A driver can drive a Cadillac and still be rude to customers.
Generalities and overblown stereotypes seem to be the stock in trade for the Uber drivers who are new to the transportation industry.

Here's one important thing to know: Passengers may like your vehicle, but they do not give a monkeys ass about it.

I own and operate 12 taxis (minivans). Over the years I have owned 90 or so vehicles.

When buying a new type of vehicle, the first thing I figure out is what can the passengers break easily.

If the backs of the front seats have pockets, the get Velcroed or sewn shut.

For the minivans I invest $750.00 in mats and vinyl upholstery. Smoking, food and drinks have long been banned from my cabs.

If you do not prepare your vehicle and stay on top of even the smallest of repairs, I guarantee you will not make 2 years. I shoot for 3 years and hope for 4.

What pisses me off the most? Not the passengers causing damage. That's expected. It's drivers not reporting it, which winds up taking more time.

Keep it clean, keep it running and keep your comments about other vehicles to yourself.
 
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Edddelos

Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #15
Generalities and overblown stereotypes seem to be the stock in trade for the Uber drivers who are new to the transportation industry.

Here's one important thing to know: Passengers may like your vehicle, but they do not give a monkeys ass about it.

I own and operate 12 taxis (minivans). Over the years I have owned 90 or so vehicles.

When buying a new type of vehicle, the first thing I figure out is what can the passengers break easily.

If the backs of the front seats have pockets, the get Velcroed or sewn shut.

For the minivans I invest $750.00 in mats and vinyl upholstery. Smoking, food and drinks have long been banned from my cabs.

If you do not prepare your vehicle and stay on top of even the smallest of repairs, I guarantee you will not make 2 years. I shoot for 3 years and hope for 4.

What pisses me off the most? Not the passengers causing damage. That's expected. It's drivers not reporting it, which winds up taking more time.

Keep it clean keep, it running and keep your comments about other vehicles to yourself.
Yes but, you actually take measures to protect your invesment (sewn shut pockets, vinyl upholstery) while others do not. I'm sure your aware that there are plenty of taxi drivers and a couple uber drivers who do not even take the time to vacuum or simply dust off their floor mats to maintain a cleaner car.
 

Another Uber Driver

Well-Known Member
Moderator
  • Yes I stated usually, which means more often or majority of time. This was said in comparison to taxis, how old are these Crown Victorias? Not all uber drivers have a new model car, but they are "newer" than the majority of taxis.
  • Most riders simply want a ride, yes most....60%. Its the other 40% you have to worry about, because they may have a "stronger" standard.
  • Most customers don't mind what the car looks like, they do care though. The customer does not desire to enter a car that looks like a "hoopty", and looks like its on its last leg, they want a car that looks like it will get them to their final destination.
Since you say you have rented, do you disagree that the majority of rentals looks like a "hoopty?"
Considering that UberX accepts anything back to Y2K and considering that almost every jurisdiction in this area has an age limit of eight years or less, I would dispute your assertion that most Uber drivers have a car that is newer than the majority of taxis. In the District of Columbia, there are even worse unduly burdensome and oppressive service life limits.

You missed the point. The overwhelming majority of customers will accept anything that is clean and appears mechanically sound. Those who do want something with luxury appointments can order a limousine and know that they can.

My experience with rentals has changed over the years. In the late 1970s through the 1980s, the majority were, in fact hoopties. In the early 1990s, there were some signs of improvement in the suburbs, especially. In the mid-1990s, the improvements began to come to the City. These days, it is about a sixty-five/thirty-five split against the hoopties.



Uber driving does not magically exempt you from the realities of driving for a living.
This poster has it. The TNCs, on the other hand, continue to perpetuate this nonsense about how TNC drivers do not have the expenses of a cab driver. They do this to justify the paltry renumeration rendered to the drivers. Further, the TNCs try to instill an unfounded elitism in their drivers. Many of the TNC drivers drink this Kool-Aid. This is no surprise, as they TNCs are the taxis unregulated competition. As some of the replies here demonstrate, we hackers resent the TNC drivers' baseless elitism. If anyone should have an elitist attitude, we should. Unlike most TNC drivers, we know this business, we know what we are doing out here and, most importantly to the consumer, we know where we are going. We know the traffic patterns, we know how to avoid Flashy Arrow Hell and we know where the one way streets and no left turn signs are.

I showed up some jackwadd UberX passenger on the last one the other day. First, he wants me to take a route straight through Flashy Arrow Hell. I tell him that if he likes sitting in traffic, we can do that, but I know a better way. He tells me that he does not think that there is any construction there. We get close, the traffic is backed up for three blocks, I point to the flashy arrows ahead, he agrees that I should take another route, if I know it. I do and I do so. Then, he tries to tell me to turn left at a certain street. I tell him that you can not turn left there. He tells me "I think you can". We get to the street, there is the NO LEFT TURN sign. Another sexual intellectual UberX user shown up. Do not mess with us or tell us our business. We know it.

Uber doesn't pay enough to justify the hassle.
.........and this is precisely why I am hearing more and more complaints from the users about Uberhoopties. At launch of UberX, the cars may have been nicer. I had thought that it would take three years for them to be pounded into hoopties, but it is happening much faster.



Generalities and overblown stereotypes seem to be the stock in trade for the Uber drivers who are new to the transportation industry.

Here's one important thing to know: Passengers may like your vehicle, but they do not give a monkeys ass about it.

Keep it clean, keep it running and keep your comments about other vehicles to yourself.
This "New Elite" thinks that it is the be-all/end-all because the TNCs have told them that.

All that they want is a clean, sound vehicle to get them where they are going. If they want appointments, they can book a limousine and pay those rates.

Thank you for the last statement.


plenty of taxi drivers and a couple uber drivers who do not even take the time to vacuum or simply dust off their floor mats to maintain a cleaner car.
It is more than a couple of Uber drivers who do not bother to clean their vehicles. In fact, there are more than a few posters here who brag about failing to support their friendly, local car wash.

The traditional interpretation of the cab sanitation rules here has been that you must go to the car wash at least once per week. I pay for my car washes on both the taxi and the UberXmobile with a credit card and save the receipt. There are two purposes to that. In the case of UberX, if some user does complain that I have a dirty car, I can photograph the receipts and forward them to Uber as proof that the car visits the Montana Avenue Car Wash with regularity. In the case of the taxi, if the Harassmen-ER-uh-HACK Inspector approaches me, I have the receipt to show that it has not been seven days since my last visit to the Montana Avenue Car Wash. Also, in case the Tax Man has any questions, I have two levels of documentation.*







*Add the usual disclaimer that I am not a tax professional, therefore I am not qualified to dispense tax advice. Anyone who seeks tax advice should seek it from a professional who is qualified to dispense tax advice.
 

Edddelos

Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #17
The overwhelming majority of customers will accept anything that is clean and appears mechanically sound.

At launch of UberX, the cars may have been nicer. I had thought that it would take three years for them to be pounded into hoopties, but it is happening much faster.

It is more than a couple of Uber drivers who do not bother to clean their vehicles. In fact, there are more than a few posters here who brag about failing to support their friendly, local car wash.
I agree passengers will accept anything, usually they just want to get in and go. However with uber we have a rating system and passengers will tend to give you a based on "apperances."

A lot of people will base whether or not the vehicle is "mechanically sound" or not on outer "appearance."(especially when buying a car)

If anyone should have an elitist attitude, we should. Unlike most TNC drivers, we know this business, we know what we are doing out here and, most importantly to the consumer, we know where we are going. We know the traffic patterns, we know how to avoid Flashy Arrow Hell and we know where the one way streets and no left turn signs are.

Do not mess with us or tell us our business. We know it.
I agree majority of uber drivers have never worked this industry before, so they are "clueless". Many will not make a year, this industry demands a lot.

I use to drive taxi in both P.G. county (many years) and Anne Arundel county(1yr), I also drove limo.

I think competition is a good thing in our market (D.C.). The door would not have opened so easily for "rideshare" if the taxi companies and/or owner operator were held accountable to have a higher standard of vehicle maintenance (Inside and out.).

Does anyone know the rule NYC has for how long a car can remain "in service" (taxi) before an "upgrade"?
 
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Another Uber Driver

Well-Known Member
Moderator
Try the New York board on the last question. Hackenstein or one of the others there could tell you.

When did you drive in Prince George's?

When did you drive in Anne Arundel?
 

Edddelos

Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #19
P.G. back in 2004, AA 2012.
My most recent job (before uber), I was a truck driver, OR.
You can say driving is "in my veins".
 
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Another Uber Driver

Well-Known Member
Moderator
I have talked to a number of PG drivers over the years.

They have told me that the rental rates out there are just as bad as they are in any other suburb. The rental rates in the City are not quite as bad as the suburbs. I had thought that they were going to get there, but it seems that rental drivers here are handing back the cabs. Until the past couple of weeks, you could not find a rental cab anywhere in the City. Now my company has more than a few available. Other companies are reporting similar. I can not imagine that these drivers have gone to UberX in the Washington Metropolitan Area, given the princely sums that it pays. Perhaps they have gone to Greater Maryland, which does pay a better mileage rate. Still, to read what one of the more prolific Greater Maryland posters states, the pings are not that frequent, there. Thus, I would suspect that there would not be enough business for those guys out there. I know that these guys are not buying their own vehicles. The DCTC is not issuing new H-Plates. There is some rumour that it will issue slightly less than two-hundred new ones, but nobody knows if, or when, that will happen.

They have told me that it has been more dangerous for some time to drive out there than it has been in the City. I suspect that this is one reason why I see many of the cabs who work the various METRO stops out there routinely turn down passengers. Frequently, I will be sitting on a bench waiting for my ride and will observe this. I expect that this practice is illegal, but, it does happen. I never drove out there, so I know little more than the basics of the business out there and what drivers tell me.

Unlike the stories that many cab drivers tell, the drivers out there tell me that they have a hard time making too much money. I hear from the Montgomery, Alexandria, Arlington and Fairfax drivers the usual fantastic stories. The more truthful drivers tell me stories that are closer to reality. I talk to enough of them that I have a pretty good idea of what they can take home in the various suburbs.

How hard is it to get a hack face in Prince George's? ........or do you know, anymore? Is there a test? What documentation do you submit?

As for Anne Arundel, I had a friend who hung up his keys here, but moved out there. He tried to drive out there, but he told me that you are more an employee of the company in Anne Arundel than anywhere around here. He wanted to drive only part time, you know, enough to pay his bar bills, buy a pack of cigarets here and there and play his numbers. He told me that none of the companies out there would allow him to drive fewer than thirty-two hours weekly.
 
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