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Uber is BAD for EVERYTHING (except cheap rides, and peanuts earning) - But OCEAN CRUISES are way worse

Kurt Halfyard

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From Environmental Pollution and Climate Change to Labour Laws (overworking and underpaying employees)...Oh My, Cruising is awful.


Some excerpts:

“I think the cruise industry, as it is today, is the epitome of capitalism run amok,” Klein says. “They own the rail cars in Alaska. They own the buses. They own the tour boats. They own the hotels. This is pure colonialism.”

“Canada doesn’t have regulations to speak of,” he says, “given it doesn’t enforce regulations when it comes to cruise ships.” An independent science panel convened by the Ocean Conservation and Tourism Alliance showed cruise ships discharging wastewater in a marine protected area of British Columbia’s Inside Passage. “This did not appear to capture the attention of Canadian authorities.” Canada has only issued two citations for environmental violations since 1992. British Columbia [is] “the toilet bowl” of the West Coast. "


Another is by minimizing wages. Cruise passengers want a deal but expect to be catered to, and that requires lots of staff. This feat is made possible, Klein says, by underpaying and overworking crew members. International labor regulations do exist, but they are supposed to be enforced by flag states (the countries ships are registered in). In practical terms, labor laws are not enforced on cruise ships, Klein explains, and the cruise lines employ whoever is willing to work the most hours for the lowest pay. Klein’s research has found that cruise ship workers earn as little as $500 per month. They do get room and board but many workers find the food provided either inadequate or unacceptable. Waitstaff and room stewards earn more, but they could be working six to 10 months without a single day off. “The working conditions are not humane,” he says. “People will talk about how they got a cheap cruise—the reason they got a cheap cruise is because it’s on the back of the worker from the developing country.”

Just one year after its sister ship the Grand Princess showed up in port with a dead humpback whale on its bow, Princess Cruises’ Star Princess dumped its scrubber sludge overboard while tied to the dock in Ketchikan, in full view of passengers, port workers, and community members. The thick, black, oily substance could be seen floating on the water surface. That was July 23, 2018. The following week, a senior vice president of CLIA, speaking to the residents of a small cruise port in Rockland, Maine, claimed its members do not dump sludge into the ocean. But CLIA member Princess Cruises has a track record at odds with industry spin. Over nearly a decade, Princess broke the law, discharging oily waste through a hidden pipe from the Caribbean Princess on the US east coast, the US Virgin Islands, and Puerto Rico. In 2016, it was fined $40-million by the US Department of Justice for the offense and cover-up. Despite the scrubbers, there was a spike in complaints regarding air quality in Alaska ports in 2018. Nine ships violated the regulations and were slapped with fines totaling $337,000, mainly in Ketchikan. For a $37.8-billion global industry, the fines, Klein says, “are just a cost of doing business”
 

Kurt Halfyard

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  • #3
$1.80/hr in many cases for 70-90 hours per week @ about $500/mo
That's Half the wage of U/L!
 

ryan137

Well-Known Member
$1.80/hr in many cases for 70-90 hours per week @ about $500/mo
That's Half the wage of U/L!
I worked on cruise ships for 3.5 years. I always thought it was crazy the wages the crew were willing to work for but I was told that when they send the money back home they are able to support their entire family with it. The people getting paid this kind of money are (for example) kitchen assistants and laundry attendants. Then there are tipped positions which often end up with a decent monthly pay $3000-$4000 US if they do a good job. People from non-wealthy countries send home that kind of money and they are living very well.
 
Last edited:

hooj

Well-Known Member
From Environmental Pollution and Climate Change to Labour Laws (overworking and underpaying employees)...Oh My, Cruising is awful.


Some excerpts:

“I think the cruise industry, as it is today, is the epitome of capitalism run amok,” Klein says. “They own the rail cars in Alaska. They own the buses. They own the tour boats. They own the hotels. This is pure colonialism.”

“Canada doesn’t have regulations to speak of,” he says, “given it doesn’t enforce regulations when it comes to cruise ships.” An independent science panel convened by the Ocean Conservation and Tourism Alliance showed cruise ships discharging wastewater in a marine protected area of British Columbia’s Inside Passage. “This did not appear to capture the attention of Canadian authorities.” Canada has only issued two citations for environmental violations since 1992. British Columbia [is] “the toilet bowl” of the West Coast. "


Another is by minimizing wages. Cruise passengers want a deal but expect to be catered to, and that requires lots of staff. This feat is made possible, Klein says, by underpaying and overworking crew members. International labor regulations do exist, but they are supposed to be enforced by flag states (the countries ships are registered in). In practical terms, labor laws are not enforced on cruise ships, Klein explains, and the cruise lines employ whoever is willing to work the most hours for the lowest pay. Klein’s research has found that cruise ship workers earn as little as $500 per month. They do get room and board but many workers find the food provided either inadequate or unacceptable. Waitstaff and room stewards earn more, but they could be working six to 10 months without a single day off. “The working conditions are not humane,” he says. “People will talk about how they got a cheap cruise—the reason they got a cheap cruise is because it’s on the back of the worker from the developing country.”

Just one year after its sister ship the Grand Princess showed up in port with a dead humpback whale on its bow, Princess Cruises’ Star Princess dumped its scrubber sludge overboard while tied to the dock in Ketchikan, in full view of passengers, port workers, and community members. The thick, black, oily substance could be seen floating on the water surface. That was July 23, 2018. The following week, a senior vice president of CLIA, speaking to the residents of a small cruise port in Rockland, Maine, claimed its members do not dump sludge into the ocean. But CLIA member Princess Cruises has a track record at odds with industry spin. Over nearly a decade, Princess broke the law, discharging oily waste through a hidden pipe from the Caribbean Princess on the US east coast, the US Virgin Islands, and Puerto Rico. In 2016, it was fined $40-million by the US Department of Justice for the offense and cover-up. Despite the scrubbers, there was a spike in complaints regarding air quality in Alaska ports in 2018. Nine ships violated the regulations and were slapped with fines totaling $337,000, mainly in Ketchikan. For a $37.8-billion global industry, the fines, Klein says, “are just a cost of doing business”
I almost worked on a cruise.
Glad I didn’t based on stories I heard from coworkers and friends. It’s lawlessness on those ships.
 

Kurt Halfyard

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  • #6
Fell down the rabbit hole on this. Good old DFW has the most Magnificent essay on Cruising from 1996 (Note: he has to explain in his article what GPS is).

 
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