Uber Has Made Taxi Drivers Less Knowledgeable

ChinatownJake

Well-Known Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #3
The headline to the article is misleading. Uber is not making those who already hack less knowledeable.
They mean that Uber drivers have diluted the overall pool and watered down the typical city expertise a Pax is going to get. But agreed, and this happens a lot on the Internet, headline grammatically is a one-star.

I think what was more interesting to me is the 38-year Brooklyn taxi vet at center of piece, talking about how the fun has gone out of it, and how he plans to switch part-time gigs when he moves to San Diego. The word for what Uber has done isn't "disruption." It's "destruction."
 

phillipzx3

Well-Known Member
It's not competition when one party is forced to follow regulations, and the other isn't.

It's also not competition when one side is subsidizing drivers and passengers while the other (who isn't backed by tax-payer bailed out Goldman, or Google) can't afford to.

Try driving your goober-mobile around without Uber subsidizing you for a year and see if your "independent contractor" business survives "competition" from the taxi industry.

Uber can't compete using the same rules . It's why they stomp their feet and leave town when they don't get their way.

And why is it Uber supporters brag about how low the rates are, yet complain all day long about lack of tips or they aren't getting enough "surge" trips?

Pot, meet kettle.
 

Another Uber Driver

Well-Known Member
Moderator
It's not competition when one party is forced to follow regulations, and the other isn't.

Uber can't compete using the same rules . It's why they stomp their feet and leave town when they don't get their way.
It is competition, allright, it just ain't fair competition.

Uber is on record as stating that it can not compete under certain regulations with which limousine and cab drivers and companies must comply.
 

RamzFanz

Well-Known Member
It's not competition when one party is forced to follow regulations, and the other isn't.

It's also not competition when one side is subsidizing drivers and passengers while the other (who isn't backed by tax-payer bailed out Goldman, or Google) can't afford to.

Try driving your goober-mobile around without Uber subsidizing you for a year and see if your "independent contractor" business survives "competition" from the taxi industry.

Uber can't compete using the same rules . It's why they stomp their feet and leave town when they don't get their way.

And why is it Uber supporters brag about how low the rates are, yet complain all day long about lack of tips or they aren't getting enough "surge" trips?

Pot, meet kettle.
Taxis can't succeed in a free market without the regulation enforced monopoly. It's all a big scam on drivers and the public. Uber has never subsidised a single ride that I've given.
 

ChortlingCrison

Well-Known Member
Taxis can't succeed in a free market without the regulation enforced monopoly. It's all a big scam on drivers and the public. Uber has never subsidised a single ride that I've given.
Where's does the word "monopoly" come in to this. Cab companies have plenty of competition, (Each other!) Jeash!!! Most cities have various cab companies. That is not a monopoly. I don't think I need to explain what that word means. If you don't... look it up....
 
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uberestimator

New Member
This is not under the control of Uber, Because do not train driver they provide a platform where people will come and find the cabs near you as well as if you would like to become a driver then become a driver . As per Uber do not that educated driver,
 
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ChinatownJake

Well-Known Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #11
It's not competition when one party is forced to follow regulations, and the other isn't.
It is competition, all right, it just ain't fair competition.

Uber is on record as stating that it cannot compete under certain regulations with which limousine and cab drivers and companies must comply.
Whatever it is, and however it has devolved over the past year, you have to hand it to Kalanick. He created a taxi business without buying a single vehicle or hiring a single dispatcher.
 

RamzFanz

Well-Known Member
Where's does the word "monopoly" come in to this. Cab companies have plenty of competition, (Each other!) Jeash!!! Most cities have various cab companies. That is not a monopoly. I don't think I need to explain what that word means. If you don't... look it up....
Cabal then. You know what I meant.
 

ChinatownJake

Well-Known Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #13
Cabal then. You know what I meant.
I've heard, from various folks, that the main L.A. taxicab companies are all basically owned by members of the same extended family. E.g., relatives and such. But I've never found a really good independent substantiation, so not sure.

Does anyone know if this is accurate? Or just an old cab driver wife's tale?
 

Beur

Well-Known Member
It's not competition when one party is forced to follow regulations, and the other isn't.

It's also not competition when one side is subsidizing drivers and passengers while the other (who isn't backed by tax-payer bailed out Goldman, or Google) can't afford to.

Try driving your goober-mobile around without Uber subsidizing you for a year and see if your "independent contractor" business survives "competition" from the taxi industry.

Uber can't compete using the same rules . It's why they stomp their feet and leave town when they don't get their way.

And why is it Uber supporters brag about how low the rates are, yet complain all day long about lack of tips or they aren't getting enough "surge" trips?

Pot, meet kettle.
You are absolutely correct. I work in a market that rarely, ok once in my 3 years, sees any Uber or Lyft subsidies, it's impossible to make a living out here doing this full time. 4 hours online yesterday between the two apps, I make a whopping $12.56. One Uber cancel at $4 and one Lyft at $6.56 plus a $2 tip.

It baffles me that I see tons of drivers out there driving highway 111 as if they're taxis, up and down from the east to the west and back again. Me I sit in my house and wait.

As for being a local resource for things to do, it's not hard, but I find most drivers don't know what's out there let alone how to get to spots. It's not hard to figure out what's hot and what's not.

Taxis out here also need to change up their business model, the 12/24 hour leases aren't feasible for the part time driver. If they had a more affordable daily rate I'm sure a lot of drivers would jump ship to drive taxis. If they offered a per day 12 hour shift rental, I'd give up uber and drive taxi.

The issue with my particular market is the astronomical fee to get started. Between your first weeks lease, drug testing, fingerprinting, insurance, and other fees it's close to $4k startup. Hardly worth it for the part time driver who only works weekends.

Taxis need to look at changing their game plan instead of constantly complaining that TNC aren't playing by the rules.
 

LA Cabbie

Well-Known Member
I've heard, from various folks, that the main L.A. taxicab companies are all basically owned by members of the same extended family. E.g., relatives and such. But I've never found a really good independent substantiation, so not sure.

Does anyone know if this is accurate? Or just an old cab driver wife's tale?
Yes, very accurate. I worked for a rich Russian owner who between him and family members owned 17 to 19 cabs in multiple cab companies. These so called owners don't drive cabs. They treat it like an apartment lease. Rent it out to some shmuck.

For taxis to truly succeed, it's not just overhauling archaic government regulations but we must eliminate or the very least greatly minimize the Comrade run mafia.
 

ChinatownJake

Well-Known Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #16
If Taxis had a more affordable daily rate I'm sure a lot of drivers would jump ship to drive taxis. If they offered a per day 12 hour shift rental, I'd give up uber and drive taxi.
That is a genius idea. I would be right behind you. Some taxi company, presuming all the other issues (background check, commercial insurance) can be transferred onto such a single shift person, should jump on this!
 

Beur

Well-Known Member
That is a genius idea. I would be right behind you. Some taxi company, presuming all the other issues (background check, commercial insurance) can be transferred onto such a single shift person, should jump on this!
You'd still have all the background check costs as well as the insurance.

$400 week upfront for a Crown Vic - 12 hour rental (shifts are 6a-6p or 6p-6a, limiting for the PT Driver)
$650 week upfront for a Crown Vic - 24 hour rental
$700 week upfront for a Prius or Van - 24 hour rental

$1,00o insurance deductible, payable in at $20 a week depending on company
$2.00 a day ($14 week paid upfront) to Sunline (bus company)
$2.50 airport fee for each drop and pickup
$95 First year drug and alcohol test, $90 every year after
$90 First year permit, $50 every year after
$15 fingerprint
5% credit card fee

Starting the week $400-$700 to the negative doesn't sit well with me and being a part time driver it doesn't work at all.
 
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NachonCheeze

Well-Known Member
Where's does the word "monopoly" come in to this. Cab companies have plenty of competition, (Each other!) Jeash!!! Most cities have various cab companies. That is not a monopoly. I don't think I need to explain what that word means. If you don't... look it up....
Ok...how about calling it a Guild??? A collective group with the intent of keeping others out and limiting outside competition.
 

ChinatownJake

Well-Known Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #20
$400 week upfront for a Crown Vic - 12 hour rental (shifts are 6a-6p or 6p-6a, limiting for the PT Driver)
$650 week upfront for a Crown Vic - 24 hour rental
$700 week upfront for a Prius or Van - 24 hour rental

$1,00o insurance deductible, payable in at $20 a week depending on company
$2.00 a day ($14 week paid upfront) to Sunline (bus company)
$2.50 airport fee for each drop and pickup
$95 First year drug and alcohol test, $90 every year after
$90 First year permit, $50 every year after
$15 fingerprint
5% credit card fee
Great list, thanks. Very educational. Had no idea the daily rental fees for vehicles were this high.
 
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