Uber eats vehicle question

Toby2

Well-Known Member
You have to remember when you login that you select the vehicle you will be using. Of course you will need to send Uber proof of insurance also for the additional vehicle.
 

911 Guy

Well-Known Member
I delivered all day in a courtesy vehicle while my car was being worked on. Eats is not rideshare and does not require additional insurance. Otherwise, everyone delivering pizza would need commercial insurance.
 

Nobo

Active Member
I delivered all day in a courtesy vehicle while my car was being worked on. Eats is not rideshare and does not require additional insurance. Otherwise, everyone delivering pizza would need commercial insurance.
you know that is against Ubers EULA ? using a car not on your uber account
 

911 Guy

Well-Known Member
you know that is against Ubers EULA ? using a car not on your uber account
It's Eats. No complaints, no problems. That was probably 300-400 rides/trips ago. So I think I'm good. I'm not even sure that Eats customers see the vehicle type?

Can anyone confirm? Sadly, I can get pings from home for restaurants less than 2 miles away, but I'm not in the delivery area and can't order.
 

Nobo

Active Member
Can anyone confirm? Sadly, I can get pings from home for restaurants less than 2 miles away, but I'm not in the delivery area and can't order.
I am not sure if they do see it but why risk it if Uber found out ? and the second part that sucks you must be right on the edge
 

911 Guy

Well-Known Member
I am not sure if they do see it but why risk it if Uber found out ? and the second part that sucks you must be right on the edge
I'm going to forgive the punctuation and try to respond correctly.

Why risk it? I had nothing better to do and made $100 while my car was being fixed. Worst case, deactivated by Uber? If that truly threatens you, you need to really reflect.

Right on the edge? Please explain this, I think I'm going to get a great laugh from your impression.
 

Nobo

Active Member
I'm going to forgive the punctuation and try to respond correctly.

Why risk it? I had nothing better to do and made $100 while my car was being fixed. Worst case, deactivated by Uber? If that truly threatens you, you need to really reflect.

Right on the edge? Please explain this, I think I'm going to get a great laugh from your impression.
On the edge of the delivery zone.
 

Launchpad McQuack

Well-Known Member
Otherwise, everyone delivering pizza would need commercial insurance.
They do..........if they want to be covered in the event of an accident. In reality, most just risk it and drive uninsured.

Linked Article said:
The only sure way to be covered for both damages to your car and liability insurance is to purchase a commercial driver policy. These policies are always more expensive than a personal policy, but they will provide the protection you need.

Eats is not rideshare and does not require additional insurance.
You are correct that it is not rideshare. In my experience, it is actually more difficult to find insurance that will cover Eats. A lot of insurance companies have started to offer rideshare endorsements that can be added to your personal insurance policy for an additional fee. By and large, though, these rideshare endorsements do not apply if you are accepting money to transport anything that is not a human being.
 

911 Guy

Well-Known Member
They do..........if they want to be covered in the event of an accident. In reality, most just risk it and drive uninsured.






You are correct that it is not rideshare. In my experience, it is actually more difficult to find insurance that will cover Eats. A lot of insurance companies have started to offer rideshare endorsements that can be added to your personal insurance policy for an additional fee. By and large, though, these rideshare endorsements do not apply if you are accepting money to transport anything that is not a human being.
Just as everything else, market, err.. State matters for insurance.

Here, I can deliver under my current policy. If another person is involved, it isn't. I did X for years before I realized that.
 

Launchpad McQuack

Well-Known Member
Just as everything else, market, err.. State matters for insurance.

Here, I can deliver under my current policy. If another person is involved, it isn't. I did X for years before I realized that.
I don't think it is so much a matter of the state as it is which insurance company you are dealing with. Every company handles it differently.

Up until last month I had a policy with esurance. When I read my policy, it was very clear that food delivery was excluded. In the section on commercial use exclusions, it specifically listed food delivery as an example of a prohibited commercial use.

So I shopped around, and in the course of doing so I talked with an agent at State Farm. She told me that food delivery was fine under their policies and that I didn't even need an additional rider to cover it as long as I wasn't transporting people. Cool. I asked to read the policy myself. After some diversion techniques, they finally gave me a copy of the policy to read. I went through it very carefully, and as far as I could tell she was right. The policy specifically stated that it allowed business use of the vehicle, but there were exclusions for passenger transport. I prepared a list of questions about the policy and sent it to her in an e-mail and asked her to confirm one last time that this policy would be okay for Uber Eats. She replied and answered my questions and confirmed that the policy would be okay for Uber Eats......as long as the delivery use of the vehicle was limited to less than 50% of the total vehicle use. This stipulation had not been mentioned prior to this point. I asked her where it said that in the policy because I read the policy very thoroughly and did not see anything about a 50% of usage condition anywhere in it. She told me that there is an additional rider that gets attached to every policy, and the 50% of use restriction is on the rider. It's not in the main policy document. When I asked to read the policy, they didn't give me a copy of the rider or even tell me that it existed. They don't issue policies without attaching that rider, though. They didn't tell me about it until I started asking questions by e-mail instead of in person......I'm guessing because the e-mails would contain a record of what they told me so they suddenly felt the need to be a little more honest.

So I shopped around some more, and I talked to an agent at Farmers. He told me that they have a rideshare endorsement that you can tack onto your personal policy.........but it's a rideshare endorsement. Not a burrito-share endorsement. As soon as you put something in your car that isn't a human being, you might as well not have the rideshare endorsement because you just violated it.

I finally ended up going with a policy from Palisades. The agent claimed that their rideshare endorsement is good for both passengers and deliveries. Unfortunately, I was kind of up against the wall by that point and didn't have time to read the policy thoroughly. I still need to sit down at some point and read it to make sure that she wasn't lying to me. One thing that I've learned from this is to not trust insurance agents. They will tell you that stuff is covered that actually isn't just to get you to buy a policy.
 

BunnyK

Well-Known Member
It's Eats. No complaints, no problems. That was probably 300-400 rides/trips ago. So I think I'm good. I'm not even sure that Eats customers see the vehicle type?

Can anyone confirm? Sadly, I can get pings from home for restaurants less than 2 miles away, but I'm not in the delivery area and can't order.
They do see the type of vehicle that you should be driving. I doubt most care about that though.
 

911 Guy

Well-Known Member
TLDR.

I don't think it is so much a matter of the state as it is which insurance company you are dealing with. Every company handles it differently.

Each individual company handles it within the State laws. Those vary.
 

dgates01

Well-Known Member
Seeing the other moped pic, I saw these in Putney, which is near London. I actually think this would be sorta fun as far as delivery goes.

313346
 
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vickilmp

Active Member
I delivered all day in a courtesy vehicle while my car was being worked on. Eats is not rideshare and does not require additional insurance. Otherwise, everyone delivering pizza would need commercial insurance.
actually if yu do ANY work like this with your car, you DO need extra insurance... rideshare is just a name folks call the insurance, but it is the same as delivering, you still need the extra ins. ubers only covers AFTER a $1000 deductible, and will NOT cover your car for comp/collision unless you have that included in your personal car ins, also... almsot all ins. companies will NOT cover an accident and then drop you from their ins IF you get in an accident while using your car for work, and they did not know you were doing that, and you did not have the required ins to cover. this has been debated to death on our state UE page, and we have several ins. agents who set us all straight on this. also.. most pizza companies have the delivery drivers as employees- so they are covered.. we are self employed.
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as far as using a different car, you can as long as it is listed on your profile.. meaning uber has it listed, has the ins. documents, etc.. is a SAFETY issue to them, that the customers see the CORRECT car/license plate number, etc.. if not, customers can/do report it, there is a place on app for them to do so, same as if is not correct person delivering..and you get a warning.
 
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