Uber Eats (UE) algortihm?

tkman

Active Member
I am trying to gain a sense of the algorithm. It is combining the end user location where the order originates, with a restaurant that can supply the food, with a driver that is available in a reasonable time and distance. Thus a chain of restaurants may have an order from the same end customer, get met from different locations, if a driver and the timing is better from a restaurant outlet that is a little further away. I have not yet decided if there is an added factor of demand that helps drive the algorithm. If an area is having or has a record of high demand and there is a shortage of drivers in that area it feels like the app will assign orders to restaurants outside the area so drivers from outside will pickup the food and then deliver to the area where there is a higher demand and a shortage of drivers. Anyone else feel this is the way the app works? Of course it may be that the app inherently works this way just by supply and demand and may not have as much intelligence programmed into the algorithm as I am suggesting. I am basing this on my driving experience. I basically accept almost all delivery requests for the first 4 hours and I routinely seem to end up in a relatively distant area where there is a lot of demand. The few times where I intentionally kept myself in a particular area I found it slower with waits between deliveries. I have not decided if the app is also factoring a driver ratings or history with the deliveries. It would be good if the algorithm gave you a crap order to follow this up with a juicy high end restaurant order or a double delivery order. Kind of feel like this may be happening a bit but hard to tell if that is just wishful thinking.
 
I envision a donut around the surge area.
Drivers go into the surge leaving the outer area with fewer drivers. Once you get pulled into the slow area orders go up but pay drops.
Not sure if there is any throttling. Had a weird slow time last night from 8:30 -9:30. Also saw other drivers picking up stacked, didn't get any myself.
Since the algo knows the tip for the order does it use that info when assigning to drivers. Q?

One Karen gave me a bad gate code and had to come outside, then didn't tip. Ugh Karen.
 

Teal

Active Member
I am trying to gain a sense of the algorithm. It is combining the end user location where the order originates, with a restaurant that can supply the food, with a driver that is available in a reasonable time and distance. Thus a chain of restaurants may have an order from the same end customer, get met from different locations, if a driver and the timing is better from a restaurant outlet that is a little further away. I have not yet decided if there is an added factor of demand that helps drive the algorithm. If an area is having or has a record of high demand and there is a shortage of drivers in that area it feels like the app will assign orders to restaurants outside the area so drivers from outside will pickup the food and then deliver to the area where there is a higher demand and a shortage of drivers. Anyone else feel this is the way the app works? Of course it may be that the app inherently works this way just by supply and demand and may not have as much intelligence programmed into the algorithm as I am suggesting. I am basing this on my driving experience. I basically accept almost all delivery requests for the first 4 hours and I routinely seem to end up in a relatively distant area where there is a lot of demand. The few times where I intentionally kept myself in a particular area I found it slower with waits between deliveries. I have not decided if the app is also factoring a driver ratings or history with the deliveries. It would be good if the algorithm gave you a crap order to follow this up with a juicy high end restaurant order or a double delivery order. Kind of feel like this may be happening a bit but hard to tell if that is just wishful thinking.

Not quite, from what I've been able to tell, the Uber app seems to pick an area where it believes you are suited to, based on a number of factors chosen by having Monkeys throw darts at a wall, the system then will shift heaven and earth to move you to the area and then will spam you with pings regardless of how many drivers are in the area.

For example - for 6 months the system decided I needed to be servicing the Mt Lawley area in Perth and would string 2-3 meals to move me into a 6km radium and then spam pings for 500m trips while there was dozens of UE bike riders in the area, in another more recent case the system began to try and send me 12km across the river to South Perth MD when it's a well know fact there is at -least- 4 cars and 6 bike riders on permanent standby.

As to why they do this, I don't know but it's normally best not to fall for the trap as once they have you in the area, they'll have you do short range trips for about 40 minutes and then dump you, forcing you to travel back to the area you came at your own expense.
 

tkman

Active Member
I have been willing to accept further deliveries - 17.7 k is my longest and these usually pay reasonably well. If it takes you to another area where there are lots of follow-on deliveries I'm good with that. I hate it when it takes you out into no where and then leaves you there with no deliveries. It would be really good if for every time they take you out to nowhere they provided a delivery to bring you back to more productive territory. Sort of like taking one for the team and then getting rewarded by receiving a delivery to bring you back. Unfortunately I don't see it working this was at present.
 

tkman

Active Member
Slow restaurants. If restaurants regularly make drivers wait why not add in an automatic delay between when an order is sent to a restaurant and when a driver is requested. I asked a restaurant person if they had any control over this and they said they can select maximum delay or come when requested. For restaurants that are just bad time managers why not make the app automatically adjust for slow restaurants?
 

Capitalism

Active Member
I envision a donut around the surge area.
Drivers go into the surge leaving the outer area with fewer drivers. Once you get pulled into the slow area orders go up but pay drops.
Not sure if there is any throttling. Had a weird slow time last night from 8:30 -9:30. Also saw other drivers picking up stacked, didn't get any myself.
Since the algo knows the tip for the order does it use that info when assigning to drivers. Q?

One Karen gave me a bad gate code and had to come outside, then didn't tip. Ugh Karen.
Karen female..
Women r not good tippers at all ..
All my good tips coming from guys.
Post automatically merged:

I have been willing to accept further deliveries - 17.7 k is my longest and these usually pay reasonably well. If it takes you to another area where there are lots of follow-on deliveries I'm good with that. I hate it when it takes you out into no where and then leaves you there with no deliveries. It would be really good if for every time they take you out to nowhere they provided a delivery to bring you back to more productive territory. Sort of like taking one for the team and then getting rewarded by receiving a delivery to bring you back. Unfortunately I don't see it working this was at present.
U cam see where u going..
If is no mans land declined .
I only do 3$ trips only way to make money on u.e.
 

tkman

Active Member
On U.E. i do all day long..
I run 4 apps at same time i do stack orders and 3$ keep me in good area.
And Uber eats wont show pre tips so if i get stiffed i only drove couple miles wont hurt me to much.
I don't understand how one can run four apps. I do Eats and this keeps me busy 95% of the time. I accept all orders but I don't see how I could be working other apps at the same time. I guess if you can somehow pre-select or identify preferred that may work. How do you manage four apps?
 

Capitalism

Active Member
I don't understand how one can run four apps. I do Eats and this keeps me busy 95% of the time. I accept all orders but I don't see how I could be working other apps at the same time. I guess if you can somehow pre-select or identify preferred that may work. How do you manage four apps?
I just take high pre tips
On grub hub and D.D.
U.E. i run as spare tire its on the bottom line.
So if something goes with my G.H and DD i will just stack U.E. bcz i can make any money running just one app so many lowballers out there..
 

manruss

New Member
I don't understand how one can run four apps. I do Eats and this keeps me busy 95% of the time. I accept all orders but I don't see how I could be working other apps at the same time. I guess if you can somehow pre-select or identify preferred that may work. How do you manage four apps?
Hi - is there a preferred area by your experience?
 

tkman

Active Member
Hi - is there a preferred area by your experience?
For me I find certain areas of my city result in better tips, better frequency, fewer waits and delays at restaurants so I do have a preference. It would really depend on the city you are working and getting to know where you prefer.
 

manruss

New Member
For me I find certain areas of my city result in better tips, better frequency, fewer waits and delays at restaurants so I do have a preference. It would really depend on the city you are working and getting to know where you prefer.
i am in Houston
 

2Cents

Well-Known Member
I am trying to gain a sense of the algorithm. It is combining the end user location where the order originates, with a restaurant that can supply the food, with a driver that is available in a reasonable time and distance. Thus a chain of restaurants may have an order from the same end customer, get met from different locations, if a driver and the timing is better from a restaurant outlet that is a little further away. I have not yet decided if there is an added factor of demand that helps drive the algorithm. If an area is having or has a record of high demand and there is a shortage of drivers in that area it feels like the app will assign orders to restaurants outside the area so drivers from outside will pickup the food and then deliver to the area where there is a higher demand and a shortage of drivers. Anyone else feel this is the way the app works? Of course it may be that the app inherently works this way just by supply and demand and may not have as much intelligence programmed into the algorithm as I am suggesting. I am basing this on my driving experience. I basically accept almost all delivery requests for the first 4 hours and I routinely seem to end up in a relatively distant area where there is a lot of demand. The few times where I intentionally kept myself in a particular area I found it slower with waits between deliveries. I have not decided if the app is also factoring a driver ratings or history with the deliveries. It would be good if the algorithm gave you a crap order to follow this up with a juicy high end restaurant order or a double delivery order. Kind of feel like this may be happening a bit but hard to tell if that is just wishful thinking.
What’s a high end juicy order?
 
Top