Uber didn't do enough to warn women about series of rapes by fake Uber drivers in LA, lawsuit alleges

Darth Vuber

Well-Known Member

New York (CNN Business)
Nine people were sexually assaulted by "fake Uber drivers" between September 2016 and February 2018 in Los Angeles, a new lawsuit alleges.
The lawsuit is being brought by three of the individuals, all listed as Jane Does, who claim they were raped by individuals who posed as Uber drivers to pick up passengers. It was filed in Los Angeles Superior Court on Friday.
The Jane Does are accusing Uber of negligence, arguing the company failed to warn them and other customers about fake drivers targeting women who were drinking in the area, despite being allegedly warned by law enforcement, according to the complaint.
The suit comes more than a week after University of South Carolina student Samantha Josephson was kidnapped and killed when she got into a vehicle she mistakenly thought was the Uber she ordered.
According to the complaint, law enforcement warned Uber on at least five occasions of assaults by fake Uber drivers within a section of Los Angeles where several popular nightclubs are located. The lawsuit claims the warnings came from the Los Angeles Police Department and the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department, and took place before the first Jane Doe was allegedly raped on June 18, 2017.
The LAPD declined to comment to CNN Business, and the LASD could not be reached for comment. F. Edie Mermelstein, who is representing the plaintiffs, also declined to comment.
Stressed out and at risk: Inside Uber's special investigations unit
Uber told CNN Business it had not yet seen a copy of the lawsuit and so could not comment on it specifically, but an Uber spokesperson said in a statement, "We have been working with local law enforcement, including the LAPD, to educate the public about how to avoid fake rideshare drivers for several years. In 2017, we launched a national campaign to remind riders to make sure they get in the right car by checking the information, like the license plate and car make and model, shown in the app. These important reminders have been part of our safety tips, and our law enforcement team regularly discusses this issue with agencies across the country."

The lawsuit claims Uber has "egregiously chosen to hide and minimize" its safety problems, which often concern "young, intoxicated female passengers, the very demographic targeted by Uber's safety marketing campaigns."
The new lawsuit alleges that Uber makes it easy for sexual predators to obtain "print at home" Uber labels to deceive passengers. Uber offers a printable version of the Uber logo for drivers who want to print one themselves and place it in their window — no login is required to download the file.
The lawsuit also claims the company has not adequately warned passengers of the dangers of fake Uber drivers, including the recent murder of Josephson in South Carolina.
In the aftermath of Josephson's death, there's been a flurry of attention to safety features built into the Uber app that customers can rely on to double-check the name, pictures and license plates of vehicles before they get in.
These measures are inadequate, the Jane Does allege in the lawsuit. "Uber Defendants fail to take into consideration that the customer they market to are typically inebriated causing enhanced difficulty in using this 'matching system,'" the suit reads. The company could do more to help inebriated passengers verify who their drivers are, the lawsuit alleges.
Uber, which is expected to go public later this year, has "placed profits over safety by deliberately failing to implement any warning system regarding this sexual assault scheme so as to rapidly expand its profits and not deter any potential users," the lawsuit says.
A CNN investigation, published and aired in April 2018, found 103 Uber drivers in the US who were accused of sexually assaulting or abusing their passengers in the four years prior. CNN's analysis was the result of an in-depth review of police reports, federal court records and county court databases for 20 major US cities.

For more than a year, CNN has been pushing Uber to reveal its data on allegations of sexual abuse and assault on its platform. Uber, which vowed to release a safety transparency report following the CNN investigation, has said the numbers will not be ready until sometime in 2019.
After CNN began asking questions about sexual assaults, Uber announced increased safety measures including a partnership with RapidSOS. It added an emergency button in the Uber app that sends a rider's location and relevant information to a police agency when pressed. Uber also revamped its background check policy, and now conducts annual checks on drivers. Following CNN's investigation, Uber announced it would do away with a policy that previously forced individuals with sexual assault complaints into arbitration and made them sign non-disclosure agreements.




 

Shakey Jake

Well-Known Member
This is an example of suing the corporation that has deep pockets for something that is not their fault. The pax know to look for their driver, and if they don't then it is not on Uber.

I picked up a couple near an off ramp of the 405 freeway last summer, and they told me a story that they ordered an uber at the Greek Theater, and they thought that their driver was drunk, and he kept missing their freeway exit, and they were feeling unsafe so they just wanted out of that car. After talking to them I told them that they need to report it to Uber, and let them know about that safety risk. It turns out that they really didn't order an Uber, but this guy was there just asking for rides, and they just got into a car that offered them a ride for cheap.

Uber has made it so normal to get into a strangers car that they do not know what risks they are taking when they get into someone who is not driving for Lyft or Uber. There is no insurance, no way to trace who they are, or any type of protection.
 

TeleSki

Well-Known Member
People suing for their own lack of commonsense.
Oh, and most of my passengers are NOT drunk, as implied in the article.
 
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UberLaLa

Well-Known Member
I agree with this lawsuit. U/L created this weird thing called 'rideshare' and they are responsible (imo) for how it plays out. If not simply to make it a safer environment/experience for their passengers. As drivers we can't forewarn passengers. We can help educate them once they are in our cars, but only one that can communicate before the trip is App designer/company.

But, U/L wants to make it seem so easy & safe to ride in their service. Pffffft...

Similar to the Pin Drop, Just push the button and a car will pull up right where you are standing. Nope.
 

MOJAVE MADMAN

Well-Known Member
I REALLY LOVE BLAMING UBER BUT...

HOW IS UBER RESPONSIBLE FOR PEOPLE POSING AS UBER DRIVERS?

IF I AM WEARING A LEBRON JAMES JERSEY AND GO KILL SOMEONE ARE THEY GONNA SUE THE LAKERS?
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Adultsearch.com
Bedpage.com
Just tell him for piece of mind to just visit his local massage parlors...
WE DRIVERS CANT AFFORD ANY HOOKER UNLESS THEY ARE THE 5 DOLLAR KIND ON WESTERN
 

Fisfis

Well-Known Member
This is an example of suing the corporation that has deep pockets for something that is not their fault. The pax know to look for their driver, and if they don't then it is not on Uber.

I picked up a couple near an off ramp of the 405 freeway last summer, and they told me a story that they ordered an uber at the Greek Theater, and they thought that their driver was drunk, and he kept missing their freeway exit, and they were feeling unsafe so they just wanted out of that car. After talking to them I told them that they need to report it to Uber, and let them know about that safety risk. It turns out that they really didn't order an Uber, but this guy was there just asking for rides, and they just got into a car that offered them a ride for cheap.

Uber has made it so normal to get into a strangers car that they do not know what risks they are taking when they get into someone who is not driving for Lyft or Uber. There is no insurance, no way to trace who they are, or any type of protection.
When hackers steal customer information through email phishing, they act like they’re from the bank.

The bank warns all of their customers by sending them an email warning about the issue of fake emails.

So instead of emailing stupid promos, Uber could have done the same, warn their customers about the fake drivers. It doesn’t cost them anything extra.

I’d say if fake UPS agents would start robbing customers homes, you’d be warned about the issue by the company. It’s their responsibility.
 

dkcs

Well-Known Member
The end result of these types of suits is it's just going to be harder for drivers as we are the face of Uber.

Wait until we need to input a code before being able to start a ride.
 

U phoria

Well-Known Member

New York (CNN Business)
Nine people were sexually assaulted by "fake Uber drivers" between September 2016 and February 2018 in Los Angeles, a new lawsuit alleges.
The lawsuit is being brought by three of the individuals, all listed as Jane Does, who claim they were raped by individuals who posed as Uber drivers to pick up passengers. It was filed in Los Angeles Superior Court on Friday.
The Jane Does are accusing Uber of negligence, arguing the company failed to warn them and other customers about fake drivers targeting women who were drinking in the area, despite being allegedly warned by law enforcement, according to the complaint.
The suit comes more than a week after University of South Carolina student Samantha Josephson was kidnapped and killed when she got into a vehicle she mistakenly thought was the Uber she ordered.
According to the complaint, law enforcement warned Uber on at least five occasions of assaults by fake Uber drivers within a section of Los Angeles where several popular nightclubs are located. The lawsuit claims the warnings came from the Los Angeles Police Department and the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department, and took place before the first Jane Doe was allegedly raped on June 18, 2017.
The LAPD declined to comment to CNN Business, and the LASD could not be reached for comment. F. Edie Mermelstein, who is representing the plaintiffs, also declined to comment.
Stressed out and at risk: Inside Uber's special investigations unit
Uber told CNN Business it had not yet seen a copy of the lawsuit and so could not comment on it specifically, but an Uber spokesperson said in a statement, "We have been working with local law enforcement, including the LAPD, to educate the public about how to avoid fake rideshare drivers for several years. In 2017, we launched a national campaign to remind riders to make sure they get in the right car by checking the information, like the license plate and car make and model, shown in the app. These important reminders have been part of our safety tips, and our law enforcement team regularly discusses this issue with agencies across the country."

The lawsuit claims Uber has "egregiously chosen to hide and minimize" its safety problems, which often concern "young, intoxicated female passengers, the very demographic targeted by Uber's safety marketing campaigns."
The new lawsuit alleges that Uber makes it easy for sexual predators to obtain "print at home" Uber labels to deceive passengers. Uber offers a printable version of the Uber logo for drivers who want to print one themselves and place it in their window — no login is required to download the file.
The lawsuit also claims the company has not adequately warned passengers of the dangers of fake Uber drivers, including the recent murder of Josephson in South Carolina.
In the aftermath of Josephson's death, there's been a flurry of attention to safety features built into the Uber app that customers can rely on to double-check the name, pictures and license plates of vehicles before they get in.
These measures are inadequate, the Jane Does allege in the lawsuit. "Uber Defendants fail to take into consideration that the customer they market to are typically inebriated causing enhanced difficulty in using this 'matching system,'" the suit reads. The company could do more to help inebriated passengers verify who their drivers are, the lawsuit alleges.
Uber, which is expected to go public later this year, has "placed profits over safety by deliberately failing to implement any warning system regarding this sexual assault scheme so as to rapidly expand its profits and not deter any potential users," the lawsuit says.
A CNN investigation, published and aired in April 2018, found 103 Uber drivers in the US who were accused of sexually assaulting or abusing their passengers in the four years prior. CNN's analysis was the result of an in-depth review of police reports, federal court records and county court databases for 20 major US cities.

For more than a year, CNN has been pushing Uber to reveal its data on allegations of sexual abuse and assault on its platform. Uber, which vowed to release a safety transparency report following the CNN investigation, has said the numbers will not be ready until sometime in 2019.
After CNN began asking questions about sexual assaults, Uber announced increased safety measures including a partnership with RapidSOS. It added an emergency button in the Uber app that sends a rider's location and relevant information to a police agency when pressed. Uber also revamped its background check policy, and now conducts annual checks on drivers. Following CNN's investigation, Uber announced it would do away with a policy that previously forced individuals with sexual assault complaints into arbitration and made them sign non-disclosure agreements.




They should also be forced to warn the public that their real uber driver could be .. A felon, undocumented, high on weed or other drugs, sexual predator, possibly not the driver or car it shows on the app, etc etc ...
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When hackers steal customer information through email phishing, they act like they’re from the bank.

The bank warns all of their customers by sending them an email warning about the issue of fake emails.

So instead of emailing stupid promos, Uber could have done the same, warn their customers about the fake drivers. It doesn’t cost them anything extra.

I’d say if fake UPS agents would start robbing customers homes, you’d be warned about the issue by the company. It’s their responsibility.
It would cost uber passengers and that’s all they care about
 

UberLaLa

Well-Known Member
The end result of these types of suits is it's just going to be harder for drivers as we are the face of Uber.

Wait until we need to input a code before being able to start a ride.
While passenger/s that just got in (late many times) will be saying, It's okay, just go...
 

20yearsdriving

Well-Known Member
People defending the Oppressor .... the Uber mind works in mysterious ways

Must be so much disruption causing this effect
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The end result of these types of suits is it's just going to be harder for drivers as we are the face of Uber.

Wait until we need to input a code before being able to start a ride.
I says a facial recognition feature in the Uber app will solve it

Kind of like the mark of the beast
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Its like back in the days, going thru backpage n calling an escort n when u met her/him up...they were fake n robbed u out of ur money...
N ur suing backpage for not warning u of fake prostitutes.
The comparison is insulting to your self

Love self a little more
 

UberLaLa

Well-Known Member
People defending the Oppressor .... the Uber mind works in mysterious ways

Must be so much disruption causing this effect
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I says a facial recognition feature in the Uber app will solve it

Kind of like the mark of the beast
They actually have that now. Uber frequently requires driver to take a photo of their face before they can go online. Of course that doesn't insure that passengers will know how to do the same, many of them are challenged just with color and make of car.

No joking, I pulled up in front of a Hookah lounge a couple nights ago to pickup my private, a lady was standing out front as I got out and she asked if I was her Uber. Me, a Black Suburban, her Uber finally pulls up, a white Prius. SMH
 
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