Uber Ambulance attempt

Cvillegordo

Well-Known Member
Sunday evening while enroute to a pickup I received a call from the passenger. "We are located on the side of the street at x, we are going to the emergency room." Me: "Why?" Response: "We were in a bike crash." Unfortunately at this point I was right by them, two bikes laying on the street, a female standing with phone, obviously injured, bloody hands. A male laying on the grass, apparently badly injured; bloody face, holding his leg. Me: "You need to call 911." Cancel. Now, there were already people stopped to help, so don't hate on me for driving away. But, are you freaking kidding me? To avoid the bill for an ambulance they call an Uber?
 

CLEVE_MAC

Active Member
I had a similar thing. Pull up to an apartment building. Dude comes limping badly down driveway, using a broom as a cane. He has a HUGE bruised and bloody face on one side, bloody arm and leg. He looked in a lot of pain. I said "you're not getting in my car with all that blood on you". He said "I just need to get home man, I fell off the balcony last night because I was very drunk". I said "call an ambulance". I then proceeded to call the police and they came with an ambulance in 5 minutes, but the dude ran away and hid in the apartment because he didn't want that. The cops were very dismissive of everything. I expected them to spend some time trying to gain access to apartment but they just shrugged shoulders and drove away, including ambulance. It was kind of shocking. They just thought if the dude doesn't want help them screw him. Ruined my day all around. Seemed like I was the only reasonable person in the entire situation!!!!
 

BigRedDriver

Well-Known Member
Imagine your feelings if u assisted another human in distress.
The blanket I drape on my seats for dogs I would use for
an injured 🤕 person.

Maybe he died of a brain aneurysms in the bushes.
Good call though, u can be proud
He did the right thing. He called for assistance for the man who refused it. He is driving a commercial vehicle and as such has tons of liability.
 

Cvillegordo

Well-Known Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #11
Imagine your feelings if u assisted another human in distress.
The blanket I drape on my seats for dogs I would use for
an injured 🤕 person.

Maybe he died of a brain aneurysms in the bushes.
Good call though, u can be proud
Well, after spending combined totsl of 26 years military and law enforcement, I feel ok with myself about stepping into harm's way to assist someone. Or NOT.
 

Uber's Guber

Well-Known Member
Me: "You need to call 911." Cancel. Now, there were already people stopped to help, so don't hate on me for driving away. But, are you freaking kidding me? To avoid the bill for an ambulance they call an Uber?
They were probably wanting to avoid a 911 call because they didn’t want police intervention; drinking while driving, possession of narcotics, active felony warrants, suspended license/insurance..... you name it, these were people worth avoiding. Good call!
 

welikecamping

Well-Known Member
Imagine your feelings if u assisted another human in distress.
The blanket I drape on my seats for dogs I would use for
an injured 🤕 person.

Maybe he died of a brain aneurysms in the bushes.
Good call though, u can be proud
So much judgement here. I would have no problem with assisting another person short of transporting them to the hospital or providing medical care beyond attempting to stop bleeding and provide comfort - after calling for paramedics. You know, the people that are actually trained to triage injuries in the field, and provide the kind of medical care that actually helps, hopefully without making it worse.

What if the person had sustained internal or spinal injuries? By transporting him, you've taken on the liability of potentially crippling or killing someone.
 

Another Uber Driver

Well-Known Member
Moderator
To avoid the bill for an ambulance they call an Uber?

Once more, welcome to my world. People have been doing this with taxicabs for years.

not.....................cleaning blood off my seats for a $5/less ride
^^^^^.............it ain't just that, there is also......oh, never mind, he already posted it.............\/ \/ \/ \/ \/
Too much legal liability.......
Neither cab drivers nor TNC drivers are trained to deal with injured people. Ambulance personnel are. You do not go to the Lancôme counter to treat measles, you go to the doctor. You do not go to the liquor store to treat a toothache, you go to the dentist.. If you are hurt and need a ride to the hospital, you call an ambulance not a taxicab nor a TNC car./


after they bloody up the inside of the car will call you heartless for charging for a cleaning fee.
..................which Fubar or Gryft will deny you.

For years, people thought that taxicab drivers were providers of Social Welfare. It comes as no surprise that people think that of TNC drivers.
 

The Gift of Fish

Well-Known Member
Sunday evening while enroute to a pickup I received a call from the passenger. "We are located on the side of the street at x, we are going to the emergency room." Me: "Why?" Response: "We were in a bike crash." Unfortunately at this point I was right by them, two bikes laying on the street, a female standing with phone, obviously injured, bloody hands. A male laying on the grass, apparently badly injured; bloody face, holding his leg. Me: "You need to call 911." Cancel. Now, there were already people stopped to help, so don't hate on me for driving away. But, are you freaking kidding me? To avoid the bill for an ambulance they call an Uber?
Next up:

- "We're going to the cemetery"
- "Why?"
- "It's Grandma's burial. Do your seats fold down? We have a coffin"
 

Cvillegordo

Well-Known Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #16
Next up:

- "We're going to the cemetery"
- "Why?"
- "It's Grandma's burial. Do your seats fold down? We have a coffin"
Haha! When my grandmother died in South Carolina in the 70s, my dad and one of my uncles picked her up at Dulles in a big station wagon, having been unable to obtain any other means of transporting the casket to Charlottesville. The story goes (which of course got better and better over the years) that it was very stormy (yes, a dark and stormy night...) and they got a flat tire, necessitating the removal of the coffin to get the spare. Of course a deputy stopped to check on them; we always imagined that he told that story to rookies for the rest of his career.
 

The Gift of Fish

Well-Known Member
Haha! When my grandmother died in South Carolina in the 70s, my dad and one of my uncles picked her up at Dulles in a big station wagon, having been unable to obtain any other means of transporting the casket to Charlottesville. The story goes (which of course got better and better over the years) that it was very stormy (yes, a dark and stormy night...) and they got a flat tire, necessitating the removal of the coffin to get the spare. Of course a deputy stopped to check on them; we always imagined that he told that story to rookies for the rest of his career.
When my grandmother died, my father and my uncles discussed transporting their mother's coffin on the subway to save costs. They figured that they'd save even more money because she'd be inside the box and you don't pay to take cargo on the subway.

Dad and his brothers could be quite weird...
 
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