Too many drivers !!!! Las Vegas is oversaturated

Uber Man Black

New Member
I've come to realize that there is just way too many drivers here in Vegas. it barely surges anymore, and when it does surge good luck getting a surge call. Lyft does not have a high demand in this city, its hard as hell to get the $235 power driver bonus or the 95 rides for the free lyft rental. there's like 150 cars in the airport on lyft which is a joke and uber has about 90 cars average in the airport . The only way to make real money is kickbacks from strip clubs and marijuana dispensaries and spas. Kiss ass to get tips and long haul passengers.
 

UberNLV

Well-Known Member
I thought you guys made big bucks taking pax to the titty bars.

No we make minimum fares dealing with tourist who've never used Uber before and have no idea how it works. People who request their Uber while they're still on the airplane and will "be there right after they get thier luggage from baggage claim. People who use pin drop to determine their pick up location but don't bother to check and they're actually at a different location five minutes away. We deal with people who don't understand each casino property has a specific pick up location and don't understand why you can't just stop on Las Vegas Blvd to pick them up. We deal with people who request their ride then ask "you're here? We didn't want to leave for another twenty minutes " just to name a few.
 

Michael-MS

Well-Known Member
No we make minimum fares dealing with tourist who've never used Uber before and have no idea how it works. People who request their Uber while they're still on the airplane and will "be there right after they get thier luggage from baggage claim. People who use pin drop to determine their pick up location but don't bother to check and they're actually at a different location five minutes away. We deal with people who don't understand each casino property has a specific pick up location and don't understand why you can't just stop on Las Vegas Blvd to pick them up. We deal with people who request their ride then ask "you're here? We didn't want to leave for another twenty minutes " just to name a few.
I see a ton of $3.75 profit there. Are you not profiting on cancellation fees because I am.
 

UberNLV

Well-Known Member
I see a ton of $3.75 profit there. Are you not profiting on cancellation fees because I am.

I do get the cancellation fees. But I'd rather just show up and have a passenger waiting for me than having to hunt them down, even if it is just a text or phone call.

That and I'm not sure if Rex havoc was serious about his statement or not. So I figured I'd throw out some reality.
 

PowersAssociates

Well-Known Member
I do get the cancellation fees. But I'd rather just show up and have a passenger waiting for me than having to hunt them down, even if it is just a text or phone call.

That and I'm not sure if Rex havoc was serious about his statement or not. So I figured I'd throw out some reality.
I text rarely and never call. Unless it's XL, then I usually give extra service like texting if they aren't there at the 3 minute mark. My plate is clear and my car is very obviously a rideshare vehicle. If they can't find it it's not my job to find them. More $ in X and Lyft cancellation fees than the garbage minimum fares that put terrible wear and tear on your vehicle. It's PAX own fault if they are not able to get to a pick up location or put the pin in the wrong place. Like I said for me, unless it's an XL rides, im not going out of my way at all EVER

At the airport I'll text aisle and space number as well as make model and color of my minivan.
 

bsliv

Well-Known Member
Las Vegas is over saturated from a driver's perspective. But riders would rather wait 2 minutes than 2 minutes 30 seconds. Rider want more drivers. Uber wants more drivers. The general public seems apathetic concerning any health or safety issues related to the number of drivers. Legislators won't do anything (good) without a public outcry or if they see more money or more power flowing toward them.

Does anyone think they have a workable solution to the driver saturation issue? The only one I can see working is a lowering of the rate paid to drivers. I don't expect that to be a popular option here. Options that I don't think will work are: capping the number of drivers allowed tnc stickers, capping the number of hours a driver may work per day/week, hiring freeze, or banning tnc vehicles from the strip.
 
R

RidingInLostWages

Guest
fwck the mods here
 
Last edited by a moderator:

LV-NightRider

Active Member
A chilling prospect, indeed.
The new team at Uber, and their counterparts at Lyft, who seem to follow in lock-step with their own version of Uber moves designed to screw both the public and drivers alike, are quickly running out of time before regulators step in to police the business. Only an arrogant punk would invite regulation when it can be avoided by simply doing the right thing.
Both companies are behaving like crack dealers trying to establish an addicted population, instead of simply growing in a businesslike manner.
The only assassin I know speaks fondly of the management teams at both companies as being ripe for targeting by someone, anyone. They are marked by their deeds. Elimination of willfully evil people is every good citizen's duty, wherever they are encountered.
A quote from the bible comes to mind. " It will be easier for a camel to pass though the eye of a needle, than for a businessman to enter into heaven." or something to that effect.
 

Udrivevegas

Well-Known Member
A chilling prospect, indeed.
The new team at Uber, and their counterparts at Lyft, who seem to follow in lock-step with their own version of Uber moves designed to screw both the public and drivers alike, are quickly running out of time before regulators step in to police the business. Only an arrogant punk would invite regulation when it can be avoided by simply doing the right thing.
Both companies are behaving like crack dealers trying to establish an addicted population, instead of simply growing in a businesslike manner.
The only assassin I know speaks fondly of the management teams at both companies as being ripe for targeting by someone, anyone. They are marked by their deeds. Elimination of willfully evil people is every good citizen's duty, wherever they are encountered.
A quote from the bible comes to mind. " It will be easier for a camel to pass though the eye of a needle, than for a businessman to enter into heaven." or something to that effect.
I'm not particularly religious, but wars are sometimes started over misquoted holy books. :rolleyes:
 

bsliv

Well-Known Member
A chilling prospect, indeed.
The new team at Uber, and their counterparts at Lyft, who seem to follow in lock-step with their own version of Uber moves designed to screw both the public and drivers alike, are quickly running out of time before regulators step in to police the business. Only an arrogant punk would invite regulation when it can be avoided by simply doing the right thing.
Both companies are behaving like crack dealers trying to establish an addicted population, instead of simply growing in a businesslike manner.
The only assassin I know speaks fondly of the management teams at both companies as being ripe for targeting by someone, anyone. They are marked by their deeds. Elimination of willfully evil people is every good citizen's duty, wherever they are encountered.
A quote from the bible comes to mind. " It will be easier for a camel to pass though the eye of a needle, than for a businessman to enter into heaven." or something to that effect.

I am particularly nonreligious but the parable is applicable. If Uber were a religious company they'd have to answer for their treatment of both their contractors and customers. But they're a private company that has to answer to its investors for their lack of (more) profit.

Uber is arrogant. They took on an industry and the regulations of the industry and won, so far. If regulators step in, there is no good outcome for drivers as a whole. If regulators ask Uber to lower the number of drivers, Uber would say, "@#$% no." If Uber were forced to comply, I think they would lower rates to reduce incentive to drive instead of a hiring freeze. Be careful what you wish for.
 

Udrivevegas

Well-Known Member
I am particularly nonreligious but the parable is applicable. If Uber were a religious company they'd have to answer for their treatment of both their contractors and customers. But they're a private company that has to answer to its investors for their lack of (more) profit.

Uber is arrogant. They took on an industry and the regulations of the industry and won, so far. If regulators step in, there is no good outcome for drivers as a whole. If regulators ask Uber to lower the number of drivers, Uber would say, "@#$% no." If Uber were forced to comply, I think they would lower rates to reduce incentive to drive instead of a hiring freeze. Be careful what you wish for.
My point was, the parable was misquoted. Not saying Uber is a crappy, mismanaged company. But the parable in it's original form was about wealthy people, and being willing to give up all your worldly possessions to follow Christ, and how the more you have, the harder that can be. A possibly more on point saying would be the Proverb, "Pride goes before destruction, and a haughty spirit before the fall."
 

uberxreallysux

Well-Known Member
I've come to realize that there is just way too many drivers here in Vegas. it barely surges anymore, and when it does surge good luck getting a surge call. Lyft does not have a high demand in this city, its hard as hell to get the $235 power driver bonus or the 95 rides for the free lyft rental. there's like 150 cars in the airport on lyft which is a joke and uber has about 90 cars average in the airport . The only way to make real money is kickbacks from strip clubs and marijuana dispensaries and spas. Kiss ass to get tips and long haul passengers.



Yup. You turned on the lights and cockroaches everywhere
 

SwGts86

Active Member
Las Vegas is over saturated from a driver's perspective. But riders would rather wait 2 minutes than 2 minutes 30 seconds. Rider want more drivers. Uber wants more drivers. The general public seems apathetic concerning any health or safety issues related to the number of drivers. Legislators won't do anything (good) without a public outcry or if they see more money or more power flowing toward them.

Does anyone think they have a workable solution to the driver saturation issue? The only one I can see working is a lowering of the rate paid to drivers. I don't expect that to be a popular option here. Options that I don't think will work are: capping the number of drivers allowed tnc stickers, capping the number of hours a driver may work per day/week, hiring freeze, or banning tnc vehicles from the strip.

Uber could start people prove they have their business licenses *now*, instead of giving people 6-8 months or whatever nonsense it is now.

They could also restrict the years on vehicles again. It's over saturated now because they expanded the year limits to as old as 2002. I noticed an *immediate* drop in volume when they did this. When I joined up it was a rolling 10 year cut off. And now people can have their pos 15 year old cars.
 

PrestonT

Well-Known Member
Uber could start people prove they have their business licenses *now*, instead of giving people 6-8 months or whatever nonsense it is now.

They could also restrict the years on vehicles again. It's over saturated now because they expanded the year limits to as old as 2002. I noticed an *immediate* drop in volume when they did this. When I joined up it was a rolling 10 year cut off. And now people can have their pos 15 year old cars.

You're operating under the misconception that Uber would want to curtail the number of drivers on the road. Drivers cost them nothing unless they have pax in the car. nothing. The more drivers with apps on, the less likely they will have to pay surge to drivers, meanwhile charging surge to riders.

The only thing that is going to curtail the number of drivers on the road is legislation. Legislation would only happen if either the resorts start screaming over all the RS drivers staging on their properties, or there comes a realization that too many RS drivers are bad for an already bad traffic situation around the Strip, or both.
 

bsliv

Well-Known Member
Or the Golden Rule. He who has the gold makes the rules.
Uber could start people prove they have their business licenses *now*, instead of giving people 6-8 months or whatever nonsense it is now.

They could also restrict the years on vehicles again. It's over saturated now because they expanded the year limits to as old as 2002. I noticed an *immediate* drop in volume when they did this. When I joined up it was a rolling 10 year cut off. And now people can have their pos 15 year old cars.

The state could also raise the business permit tax from $200 to $2000. That might increase the cash they collect from drivers and legislators seem to like collecting cash.
 
Last edited:
Top