Tips for new drivers

bostonwolf

Well-Known Member
I've been thinking of posting something like this. Things I wish I'd known when I started. Like

  • Download Intuit Quickbooks Self-Employed, turn on "automatic mileage tracking" and sync your bank account that receives all rideshare payments. It tracks your mileage and will give you a running count of what your next quarterly tax payment should be. Well worth $10/month.

  • Buy tires at a place that rotates them for free. I use Town Fair Tires. After a certain amount of mileage they will rotate for maybe $5. They will also repair any flats or leaks for free. Can't beat it.

  • Use synthetic motor oil and don't replace it before 10k, if then. A lot of modern cars have sensors to tell you when the oil viscosity is getting bad. I went 15k on my last change and the sensors never went off.

  • If you know you're in a decent spot for rides, park and wait for one to come in. If it's really slow turn on Lyft and take the first ride that comes in. I prefer Uber as I usually only drive during boost times, but I prefer earning to not earning even more.

  • Linger in the suburbs (Cambridge, Allston, Brighton, Somerville) in the AM and near downtown in the PM.

  • If you get an early morning airport run it might be worth turning on the destination filter and setting it to Cambridge and hopping on 90 to the Brighton exit as opposed to waiting downtown for rides.

  • If it's late at night and you are picking people up at a bar try to get a look a them before you let them in your car. Drive a bit past the bar or stop a bit before and make them walk to you. If they look blitzed or rowdy, keep on driving and cancel the ride. 1000 rides+ and no vomit so far (knocking on wood.)

  • Put aside the tax money. You don't want to have to come up with that at the end of the year.

  • If you have a super long ride that is going to result in deadmiles coming back, make sure you take a ride the second you get back. Example: I had a ride from Boston to Provincetown. Set the destination filter for Boston and picked up a ride in Quincy on the way back. That means I can write off the miles going both too and from. A nice additional boost in income.

  • Corollary to this rule: If you are nearing the end of your shift and get a ride that drops off close to where you live, consider calling it a night unless there is some crazy surging going on. You cannot write off the miles you ride home. You CAN write off miles used driving to a good location to begin working.

Anyone else?
 

driver5494

Well-Known Member
You should have your own show. Call it 'The Uber Masochist'.

Folks, if u want to get sick of this job real quick, grind ur brakes to dust, burn a lot of gas coming off a ton of starts and stops and get bombarded with Uberpools then drive in Somerville and Cambridge.
 

bostonwolf

Well-Known Member
I generally pull around $30- $50 an hour. If you have something constructive to add, do so. You can use any number of other threads to continue being a dick.
 

driver5494

Well-Known Member
I generally pull around $30- $50 an hour. If you have something constructive to add, do so. You can use any number of other threads to continue being a &%[email protected]!*.

Oh you're the one who makes 30 to 50 dollars an hour driving in Somerville and Cambridge? Forgive me. I didn't realize I was in the presence of greatness.
 

emcarle

Member
I thought you were just a total asshat to new drivers but apparently you're like that with everyone.

To the OP, thank you for giving such insight. Very much appreciated.
 

bostonwolf

Well-Known Member
Oh you're the one who makes 30 to 50 dollars an hour driving in Somerville and Cambridge? Forgive me. I didn't realize I was in the presence of greatness.

Yeah, I drive in those towns and then when PAX want to go to Boston, I turn around and come back. What an ass hat.
 
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