Three weeks after Car Passed Inspection, still waiting to be active!

Larrikin

Active Member
As somebody who has used Uber as a passenger very happily for the last year or so, I'm finding the process of becoming an Uber driver, probably the most frustrating process I've ever been through, it's actually making Telstra look efficient. Having presented with all the prerequisites - F Class (had it for 34yrs), suitable vehicle - spotless with less than 50,000kms, Class 3F licence papers, full rideshare insurance (with SGIO), current police Clearance, Driving History Check and medical, there just seems to be interminable delay after delay, Uber communication is basically non-existent.
It strikes me that it's very much an American company, - US business has never quite been able to let go the concept of slave labour - hence the abysmal wages in the US. I can accept that Uber is simply churning drivers out, it's rather obvious when you go to Subiaco and see people lined up and you wonder how on earth they're going to meet the latest requirements. It strikes me that although there's no way you could justify buying a car specifically to drive for Uber, there are possibilities for earning reasonable money as a sideline, I could be wrong and no great harm done if that proves not to be the case. Certainly I'm quite sure their claimed insurance is Scotch Mist, anybody relying on that is in for a rude shock at some stage, but does anybody know how long it actually takes when you present them with everything? It almost seems as though Uber doesn't like it, if you have everything organised and communication is virtually non-existent. Am I right in thinking they're really looking for people who are desperate, rather than people who are interested in the concept as a cash-earning sideline? Perhaps they're trying to tell me to go away?
 

UberPig

Well-Known Member
Are people still queuing at Subi?!? Jeez. Mine went fairly smoothly. Maybe they're in no rush for drivers at the moment?? especially if the queues are still there. Im gonna put myself in the far queue soon,,,, :wink:
 

PaulPerth

Active Member
Am I right in thinking they're really looking for people who are desperate, rather than people who are interested in the concept as a cash-earning sideline?

I still don't get where exactly is the cash-earning sideline in a partnership that require costly insurances, having regular meetings with drunk people, sustaining costly maintenances, managing abn+gst, keeping your car in decent condition (you cannot imagine how quickly people will ruin your car, even if you will be there) and handling the car depreciation..

Seriously... where is this income? If we are talking about Uber Black full time, sure, that's business. But UberX, nah.. pizza delivery is much easier and less responsibilities!
 

Uberelitescv1

Active Member
Spot on Paul! Very well said.

Larrikin mate they have tons of drivers, they have no need for you, expect to be screwed around like this, just enjoy your free days while you still got them.
 

Larrikin

Active Member
Are people still queuing at Subi?!? Jeez. Mine went fairly smoothly. Maybe they're in no rush for drivers at the moment?? especially if the queues are still there. Im gonna put myself in the far queue soon,,,, :wink:
Yes, I rather reached the same conclusion myself - shelved until the churn factor means they want you in the queue.
 

Larrikin

Active Member
I still don't get where exactly is the cash-earning sideline in a partnership that require costly insurances, having regular meetings with drunk people, sustaining costly maintenances, managing abn+gst, keeping your car in decent condition (you cannot imagine how quickly people will ruin your car, even if you will be there) and handling the car depreciation..

Seriously... where is this income? If we are talking about Uber Black full time, sure, that's business. But UberX, nah.. pizza delivery is much easier and less responsibilities!
You may well be right, however we've used Uber across Oz quite regularly and found the drivers and cars , with one exception, to be excellent, far, far better than taxis. I can see where servicing certain areas and events would lead to drunks, but surely you don't have to work those events / areas if you don't wish to - leave the Leederville's, Northbridge's and racetracks to others. The taxation thing is not really an issue, it's all profit and loss. My accountants had looked at Uber for another client and reached the conclusion it was impossible to make money, but agrees there are possibilities, depending on how you approach the opportunity.
 

Uberelitescv1

Active Member
You may well be right, however we've used Uber across Oz quite regularly and found the drivers and cars , with one exception, to be excellent, far, far better than taxis. I can see where servicing certain areas and events would lead to drunks, but surely you don't have to work those events / areas if you don't wish to - leave the Leederville's, Northbridge's and racetracks to others. The taxation thing is not really an issue, it's all profit and loss. My accountants had looked at Uber for another client and reached the conclusion it was impossible to make money, but agrees there are possibilities, depending on how you approach the opportunity.
Do I have to explain why again?

Because 95% of drivers do not know the difference between 'net income' and 'cash flow.'

They see the $$$ coming in and they mistake it for net profit.

Only the 5% that sees the lies leaves ...
 

Srbija

Active Member
Larrikin,I think that your problem is horse power of the car. You have only one by the picture of Don Quixote. LOL
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UberDriverAU

Well-Known Member
If they were desperate for drivers, I can assure you that you'd have already been approved and on the road. Their lastest move (increase in their share to 25%) is a clear signal that there is an oversupply of drivers in Perth. They genuinely do not need you driving. They won't refuse you unless it's clear that you shouldn't be driving, but they'll send the signal with unnecessary delays and their "commission" strategy.
 

Potsy

Well-Known Member
If they were desperate for drivers, I can assure you that you'd have already been approved and on the road. Their lastest move (increase in their share to 25%) is a clear signal that there is an oversupply of drivers in Perth. They genuinely do not need you driving. They won't refuse you unless it's clear that you shouldn't be driving, but they'll send the signal with unnecessary delays and their "commission" strategy.
I was one of ubers first drivers and i went to onboarding session showed my docs and my car and they logged me on straight away. However, I was only driver there at the time signing up.
 

Uberelitescv1

Active Member
Their must be an evil master in charge of their worshippers, what the master says (drop rates, increase commission) the worshippers just follow. The uber guys working at the subi office are just puppets on strings ...
 

Aussie Battler

New Member
If they were desperate for drivers, I can assure you that you'd have already been approved and on the road. Their lastest move (increase in their share to 25%) is a clear signal that there is an oversupply of drivers in Perth. They genuinely do not need you driving. They won't refuse you unless it's clear that you shouldn't be driving, but they'll send the signal with unnecessary delays and their "commission" strategy.
Yep spot on UberDriverAU im way up north and looking at the app at most times of any day it looks like a swarm of flys around a T*+RD
 

Potsy

Well-Known Member
If they were desperate for drivers, I can assure you that you'd have already been approved and on the road. Their lastest move (increase in their share to 25%) is a clear signal that there is an oversupply of drivers in Perth. They genuinely do not need you driving. They won't refuse you unless it's clear that you shouldn't be driving, but they'll send the signal with unnecessary delays and their "commission" strategy.
Well should we who are already driving view this as good news as it shows Uber doing something to limit supply?
 

UberDriverAU

Well-Known Member
Well should we who are already driving view this as good news as it shows Uber doing something to limit supply?
It depends on a few things:

(1) The rate at which demand increases.
(2) The rate at which existing drivers quit.
(3) The rate at which new drivers sign up.

The net effect of the recent changes should be increased demand, and decreased supply. This is generally true where prices go down (rate cut in Feb), or effective prices go down (lower driver commission in the last few days). Over the coming months existing drivers shouldn't be (on average) worse off, if economic theory holds true in reality. Some drivers might be better off, some worse off, and some won't see a difference. A lot depends on your individual circumstances.
 

UberDriverAU

Well-Known Member
To dehumanise what Uber does completely, the way they operate is actually an incredibly effective way of controlling both supply and demand.

If they hold prices constant and increase the Uber tax (let us all call it this?) to select portions of the driver population, they can effectively decrease supply with no change in demand.

Likewise, if they hold driver payments constant and reduce the Uber tax, this would reduce prices which should cause an increase in demand with no change in supply.
 

Potsy

Well-Known Member
To dehumanise what Uber does completely, the way they operate is actually an incredibly effective way of controlling both supply and demand.

If they hold prices constant and increase the Uber tax (let us all call it this?) to select portions of the driver population, they can effectively decrease supply with no change in demand.

Likewise, if they hold driver payments constant and reduce the Uber tax, this would reduce prices which should cause an increase in demand with no change in supply.
I had some economics uni students in the car recently and they said their lecturer often uses Uber as an example of the perfect system the way they can manipulate supply and demand to suit their requirements.
They are effective as you say but with little regard for the human impact it has on people.
 
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