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This job changes people. But is Samoir forgiven?

Is Samoir forgiven?

  • He is forgiven

    Votes: 72 66.7%
  • He is not forgiven

    Votes: 36 33.3%

  • Total voters
    108

SEAL Team 5

Well-Known Member
The final question: is Samoir forgiven?
I don't know if Samoir is forgiven, but he sounds like he became a typical taxi cab driver.

If there was an Uber bible, and there were stories with lessons in them. This would be in Book 1.
I'm thinking the creation of Uber would be more along the lines of Genesis Book 1. This story reflects more of the tribulations of Armageddon in the Book of Revelations.
 

reg barclay

Well-Known Member
Moderator
Some good points there. Maybe he's no better than the liars and cheats who got him suspended and cost him money etc if he does the same thing back in retaliation.
It's also possible that some of these pax had drivers who did things such as hiding from them to get a cancellation fee or the like, which contributed to their cynicism and helped them rationalize their actions, maybe those drivers had other pax do similar things to them. I'm not justifying the actions of either bad drivers or pax, I'm just saying that when it comes to these kinds of issues it's not always easy to figure where the bad cycle began. I'd still argue that when someone finds themselves in such a place or situation, there's a difference between not letting oneself be taken advantage of, on the one hand, and becoming an active part of the bad cycle, on the other.
 

iheartuber

Well-Known Member
Driving for Uber would turn even Gandhi into a murderer

Great read

I know this guy, Samoir. He's like a very good friend. Samoir always used to be the kind of guy who would try to live by some kind of moral code, trying to do the right thing instead of wrong. It wasn't a perfectly applied code, he wasn't Jesus Christ or Moses, but his moral compass generally worked ok.

Then he started doing Uber and Lyft. At first he did the job according to this moral code. He was always polite to pax. He laughed at their jokes. He answered their same repeated questions for a tenth, a hundredth and a thousandth time. He returned left-behind cellphones, keys and glasses without thinking of having to ask for compensation for his time. He waited for pax until 5:00 and never shuffled them. He was always honest. He took all of them wherever they wanted to go.

But this job changes people. He was exposed to the dregs of society. 98% of pax were fine, normal decent people, and that was great. But there were also the dregs, and these are the ones who caused a change in him.

It started with the inane questions. The first change in him was to start to lie and make up stories in answer to "where do you live / what's your "real" job / do you have kids / etc". Lying's not good, but this really is none of pax' business, so Samoir adapted and fed them bullshit lies. Humans adapt; it's what we do. If we didn't, we'd still be living in trees and sniffing each others' backsides. Telling these lies isn't such a big deal, but there was worse to come.

The next change came when Samoir found out that pax make up false stories to try to get Uber to take their fare back from the driver and refund it to them. The false reports started coming in. "Driving impaired". "Wrong route taken". Or not having been given a ride at all. Suspensions followed, unjustified of course. So he learned to lie about them too. Whatever lie the pax had told about him, he retorted with a bigger lie about the pax. If a pax alleged that he had driven impaired then he countered that the pax had been drunk, abusive and threatened violence, and should be deactivated immediately for the safety of other drivers.

When a pax tramped mud into his car and made a minor mess, Samoir didn't know which pax it was. But even if he had known then the pax would just lie and deny it. He didn't know which one of them it had been, and it didn't matter. All he cared about was getting paid. He not only picked a pax at random, he also embellished the report to claim that the mud was dog shit. His ethics code no longer applied and his moral compass was well on its way to becoming totally non-functional.

Early on in his rideshare escapades, he had returned pax items when he found them in his car. Then came the many encounters with the drunks. These sorry creatures who can't even retain consciousness, let alone their personal items. He came to hate how needy they were, and hated how utterly pathetic they were, losing their wits like that in public. One night a young lady was put into the back seat by another couple. She was the drunk third wheel, and Samoir was the garbage man who would be removing her. When he arrived at the lady's house it was hard to wake her up. When she did finally wake, she just stared blankly at him, looking around and not knowing where she was. Then she stumbled out of the car and walked zig-zag across the street in the vague direction of her house. Samoir stared after her in disgust, and reached around to the back seat to recover her phone. Whereas before he would have run after her to immediately return the item, that wasn't going to happen. Not this time. For being such a pathetic and disgusting drunk she would need to pay a price. As he returned home over one of the bay bridges, the iPhone was defenestrated, maybe temporarily restoring the balance of justice in some way. Either way, it made Samoir feel a little better.

Samoir would not have thought of ever asking for a reward to return items. But there were too many times when the pax just took the item, said "Thanks so much! This is incredible!". And then shut the door on him. To hell with them. Then Uber's $15 return fee was introduced. If it's an easy return, Samoir will do it. If not, tough luck.

Also gone were the days of patiently waiting for pax to come out of their houses or out of the bar, simply because those were the rules and "the right thing to do". That lasted a while, but finally enough was enough. If you order a damn car, then you come out of your house and get in the damn car. He found the way to shuffle pax and take 5 bucks from them without waiting. Was that the right thing to do or was that, in some way, stealing? He was past caring by this stage.

Honesty? Gone too. Pax want to be taken to the other side of the bay to SeventyCentsPerMileVille? Nope. He started to phone the pax and make up whatever lie to have them cancel. Pax would say that they wouldn't cancel because they would get charged. He assured them that they would not. He learned to say whatever it took. Again, tough luck.

Samoir went from being a decent, ethical guy to a reflection of Travis Bickle in the space of a few short months. If taxi drivers are known as being dishonest, grumpy and apathetic is it their fault? Or did their pax make them that way?

The final question: is Samoir forgiven?
Forgiven?

Hell, let me buy him a beer!
 

freeFromUber

Well-Known Member
I know this guy, Samoir. He's like a very good friend. Samoir always used to be the kind of guy who would try to live by some kind of moral code, trying to do the right thing instead of wrong. It wasn't a perfectly applied code, he wasn't Jesus Christ or Moses, but his moral compass generally worked ok.

Then he started doing Uber and Lyft. At first he did the job according to this moral code. He was always polite to pax. He laughed at their jokes. He answered their same repeated questions for a tenth, a hundredth and a thousandth time. He returned left-behind cellphones, keys and glasses without thinking of having to ask for compensation for his time. He waited for pax until 5:00 and never shuffled them. He was always honest. He took all of them wherever they wanted to go.

But this job changes people. He was exposed to the dregs of society. 98% of pax were fine, normal decent people, and that was great. But there were also the dregs, and these are the ones who caused a change in him.

It started with the inane questions. The first change in him was to start to lie and make up stories in answer to "where do you live / what's your "real" job / do you have kids / etc". Lying's not good, but this really is none of pax' business, so Samoir adapted and fed them bullshit lies. Humans adapt; it's what we do. If we didn't, we'd still be living in trees and sniffing each others' backsides. Telling these lies isn't such a big deal, but there was worse to come.

The next change came when Samoir found out that pax make up false stories to try to get Uber to take their fare back from the driver and refund it to them. The false reports started coming in. "Driving impaired". "Wrong route taken". Or not having been given a ride at all. Suspensions followed, unjustified of course. So he learned to lie about them too. Whatever lie the pax had told about him, he retorted with a bigger lie about the pax. If a pax alleged that he had driven impaired then he countered that the pax had been drunk, abusive and threatened violence, and should be deactivated immediately for the safety of other drivers.

When a pax tramped mud into his car and made a minor mess, Samoir didn't know which pax it was. But even if he had known then the pax would just lie and deny it. He didn't know which one of them it had been, and it didn't matter. All he cared about was getting paid. He not only picked a pax at random, he also embellished the report to claim that the mud was dog shit. His ethics code no longer applied and his moral compass was well on its way to becoming totally non-functional.

Early on in his rideshare escapades, he had returned pax items when he found them in his car. Then came the many encounters with the drunks. These sorry creatures who can't even retain consciousness, let alone their personal items. He came to hate how needy they were, and hated how utterly pathetic they were, losing their wits like that in public. One night a young lady was put into the back seat by another couple. She was the drunk third wheel, and Samoir was the garbage man who would be removing her. When he arrived at the lady's house it was hard to wake her up. When she did finally wake, she just stared blankly at him, looking around and not knowing where she was. Then she stumbled out of the car and walked zig-zag across the street in the vague direction of her house. Samoir stared after her in disgust, and reached around to the back seat to recover her phone. Whereas before he would have run after her to immediately return the item, that wasn't going to happen. Not this time. For being such a pathetic and disgusting drunk she would need to pay a price. As he returned home over one of the bay bridges, the iPhone was defenestrated, maybe temporarily restoring the balance of justice in some way. Either way, it made Samoir feel a little better.

Samoir would not have thought of ever asking for a reward to return items. But there were too many times when the pax just took the item, said "Thanks so much! This is incredible!". And then shut the door on him. To hell with them. Then Uber's $15 return fee was introduced. If it's an easy return, Samoir will do it. If not, tough luck.

Also gone were the days of patiently waiting for pax to come out of their houses or out of the bar, simply because those were the rules and "the right thing to do". That lasted a while, but finally enough was enough. If you order a damn car, then you come out of your house and get in the damn car. He found the way to shuffle pax and take 5 bucks from them without waiting. Was that the right thing to do or was that, in some way, stealing? He was past caring by this stage.

Honesty? Gone too. Pax want to be taken to the other side of the bay to SeventyCentsPerMileVille? Nope. He started to phone the pax and make up whatever lie to have them cancel. Pax would say that they wouldn't cancel because they would get charged. He assured them that they would not. He learned to say whatever it took. Again, tough luck.

Samoir went from being a decent, ethical guy to a reflection of Travis Bickle in the space of a few short months. If taxi drivers are known as being dishonest, grumpy and apathetic is it their fault? Or did their pax make them that way?

The final question: is Samoir forgiven?
I have a question.....or two. How long did it take you to make up this BS.,,and why??? After 6,876 ride, I had exactly ONE pax who made up a story to try and get his $68 fare back....which Uber initially took from me. After detailing the actual facts of the ride, and demanding the pax name and address so I could file charges for theft of services, I was credited back the fare without further question. It obviously doesn’t happen very often....unless of course, you did something to deserve it.
 
Last edited:

freeFromUber

Well-Known Member
Who cares! It's sparked a fascinating discussion about philosophy, ethics, etc.
Who cares what other people do or think. If you live your life the right way, do what is right and hold yourself to high moral standards instead of lowering yourself to the least common denominator, everything will work out in the end.
 

MadTownUberD

The Trendy Transporter
Moderator
Who cares what other people do or think. If you live your life the right way, do what is right and hold yourself to high moral standards instead of lowering yourself to the least common denominator, everything will work out in the end.
I was responding to your unedited post. Looks like you changed it afterwards.
 

Jayjay9317

Well-Known Member
I know this guy, Samoir. He's like a very good friend. Samoir always used to be the kind of guy who would try to live by some kind of moral code, trying to do the right thing instead of wrong. It wasn't a perfectly applied code, he wasn't Jesus Christ or Moses, but his moral compass generally worked ok.

Then he started doing Uber and Lyft. At first he did the job according to this moral code. He was always polite to pax. He laughed at their jokes. He answered their same repeated questions for a tenth, a hundredth and a thousandth time. He returned left-behind cellphones, keys and glasses without thinking of having to ask for compensation for his time. He waited for pax until 5:00 and never shuffled them. He was always honest. He took all of them wherever they wanted to go.

But this job changes people. He was exposed to the dregs of society. 98% of pax were fine, normal decent people, and that was great. But there were also the dregs, and these are the ones who caused a change in him.

It started with the inane questions. The first change in him was to start to lie and make up stories in answer to "where do you live / what's your "real" job / do you have kids / etc". Lying's not good, but this really is none of pax' business, so Samoir adapted and fed them bullshit lies. Humans adapt; it's what we do. If we didn't, we'd still be living in trees and sniffing each others' backsides. Telling these lies isn't such a big deal, but there was worse to come.

The next change came when Samoir found out that pax make up false stories to try to get Uber to take their fare back from the driver and refund it to them. The false reports started coming in. "Driving impaired". "Wrong route taken". Or not having been given a ride at all. Suspensions followed, unjustified of course. So he learned to lie about them too. Whatever lie the pax had told about him, he retorted with a bigger lie about the pax. If a pax alleged that he had driven impaired then he countered that the pax had been drunk, abusive and threatened violence, and should be deactivated immediately for the safety of other drivers.

When a pax tramped mud into his car and made a minor mess, Samoir didn't know which pax it was. But even if he had known then the pax would just lie and deny it. He didn't know which one of them it had been, and it didn't matter. All he cared about was getting paid. He not only picked a pax at random, he also embellished the report to claim that the mud was dog shit. His ethics code no longer applied and his moral compass was well on its way to becoming totally non-functional.

Early on in his rideshare escapades, he had returned pax items when he found them in his car. Then came the many encounters with the drunks. These sorry creatures who can't even retain consciousness, let alone their personal items. He came to hate how needy they were, and hated how utterly pathetic they were, losing their wits like that in public. One night a young lady was put into the back seat by another couple. She was the drunk third wheel, and Samoir was the garbage man who would be removing her. When he arrived at the lady's house it was hard to wake her up. When she did finally wake, she just stared blankly at him, looking around and not knowing where she was. Then she stumbled out of the car and walked zig-zag across the street in the vague direction of her house. Samoir stared after her in disgust, and reached around to the back seat to recover her phone. Whereas before he would have run after her to immediately return the item, that wasn't going to happen. Not this time. For being such a pathetic and disgusting drunk she would need to pay a price. As he returned home over one of the bay bridges, the iPhone was defenestrated, maybe temporarily restoring the balance of justice in some way. Either way, it made Samoir feel a little better.

Samoir would not have thought of ever asking for a reward to return items. But there were too many times when the pax just took the item, said "Thanks so much! This is incredible!". And then shut the door on him. To hell with them. Then Uber's $15 return fee was introduced. If it's an easy return, Samoir will do it. If not, tough luck.

Also gone were the days of patiently waiting for pax to come out of their houses or out of the bar, simply because those were the rules and "the right thing to do". That lasted a while, but finally enough was enough. If you order a damn car, then you come out of your house and get in the damn car. He found the way to shuffle pax and take 5 bucks from them without waiting. Was that the right thing to do or was that, in some way, stealing? He was past caring by this stage.

Honesty? Gone too. Pax want to be taken to the other side of the bay to SeventyCentsPerMileVille? Nope. He started to phone the pax and make up whatever lie to have them cancel. Pax would say that they wouldn't cancel because they would get charged. He assured them that they would not. He learned to say whatever it took. Again, tough luck.

Samoir went from being a decent, ethical guy to a reflection of Travis Bickle in the space of a few short months. If taxi drivers are known as being dishonest, grumpy and apathetic is it their fault? Or did their pax make them that way?

The final question: is Samoir forgiven?
Has he done somthing wrong? I don't find anything wrong he has done.
 

The Gift of Fish

Well-Known Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #114
when uber refuse to pay you a trip that took you ALL DAY because it was a fraudulent trip. most part of times, it's not drivers fault.. the credit card check it's on uber's side. and they earn a % of YOUR work, so they have to assumpt the risks.
Exactly. Uber doesn't get to both earn commissions for performing credit card and customer verification when they get this right and pass fraud costs on to the driver when they get it wrong.
 

dkhoser

Member
When in Rome do as the Romans when involved in a evil unethical Ponzi scheme do as a capitalist or end up steak on the plate.

I do quite well avoiding 90% of the blank contracts Uber sends me, I don't know whose picking these people up but it is their choice at this point. You want $2 after gas have at it.

Don't get mad get even someone steals $1 from you get back 10 poor people aren't supposed to have chauffeurs & private drivers, cabs aren't meant to be taken daily the respectful adults use xl or select AND tip, the flashy event crowd gets the black, cheapskates request x & dirtbags request pool everyone knows what they doing
 
Last edited:

The Gift of Fish

Well-Known Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #117
I have a question.....or two. How long did it take you to make up this BS.,,and why??? After 6,876 ride, I had exactly ONE pax who made up a story to try and get his $68 fare back....which Uber initially took from me. After detailing the actual facts of the ride, and demanding the pax name and address so I could file charges for theft of services, I was credited back the fare without further question. It obviously doesn’t happen very often....unless of course, you did something to deserve it.
Well, you only asked one question, so I'll answer it. All of the events in the story were real, to the best of my knowledge. Intrusive, nosey and inquisitive pax do exist. Pax who make a mess in the back of drivers' cars without then saying a word about it, much less apologising, also exist. So do pax who demand, not request, to have items returned that they left through carelessness, and then not tip/compensate the drivers' extra time because "it's included" and expected. Pax disrespect their drivers by making them wait and in other ways. And, of couse, the drunks often behave appallingly. Then there are the false reports from pax and the attempts to have fares refunded. All of these things are features of rideshare.

It looks like you missed the point of this thread. It's not how often these things happen. Obviously the questioning/interrogations and make-you-wait are daily occurrences while the seriously abusive drunks, the false reports and the refund attempts are less common. As I said at the beginning, 98% of pax are not bottom-of-the barrel. Rather, the point of this thread was show how this job changed one guy, and to wonder whose fault it was - the pax and Uber/Lyft for trying to take advantage of him, or his for not keeping to the moral high ground.
 

NorCalPhil

Well-Known Member
98% of pax were fine, normal decent people, and that was great. But there were also the dregs, and these are the ones who caused a change in him.
If 2% of the population can cause you to lose your moral compass, you never had one to begin with. These people didn't change him. They freed his inner self from self-imposed shackles and allowed him to express his true persona - that of a 2% dirtbag.
 

The Gift of Fish

Well-Known Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #119
If 2% of the population can cause you to lose your moral compass, you never had one to begin with. These people didn't change him. They freed his inner self from self-imposed shackles and allowed him to express his true persona - that of a 2% dirtbag.
It's interesting that you think that acting morally and ethically is shackling oneself. Maybe it is. If that's so then that would mean that it's people's natural tendency to screw other people over and that true empathy doesn't exist. But I'm not sure I agree with that.
 

circle1

Well-Known Member
I know this guy, Samoir. He's like a very good friend. Samoir always used to be the kind of guy who would try to live by some kind of moral code, trying to do the right thing instead of wrong. It wasn't a perfectly applied code, he wasn't Jesus Christ or Moses, but his moral compass generally worked ok.

Then he started doing Uber and Lyft. At first he did the job according to this moral code. He was always polite to pax. He laughed at their jokes. He answered their same repeated questions for a tenth, a hundredth and a thousandth time. He returned left-behind cellphones, keys and glasses without thinking of having to ask for compensation for his time. He waited for pax until 5:00 and never shuffled them. He was always honest. He took all of them wherever they wanted to go.

But this job changes people. He was exposed to the dregs of society. 98% of pax were fine, normal decent people, and that was great. But there were also the dregs, and these are the ones who caused a change in him.

It started with the inane questions. The first change in him was to start to lie and make up stories in answer to "where do you live / what's your "real" job / do you have kids / etc". Lying's not good, but this really is none of pax' business, so Samoir adapted and fed them bullshit lies. Humans adapt; it's what we do. If we didn't, we'd still be living in trees and sniffing each others' backsides. Telling these lies isn't such a big deal, but there was worse to come.

The next change came when Samoir found out that pax make up false stories to try to get Uber to take their fare back from the driver and refund it to them. The false reports started coming in. "Driving impaired". "Wrong route taken". Or not having been given a ride at all. Suspensions followed, unjustified of course. So he learned to lie about them too. Whatever lie the pax had told about him, he retorted with a bigger lie about the pax. If a pax alleged that he had driven impaired then he countered that the pax had been drunk, abusive and threatened violence, and should be deactivated immediately for the safety of other drivers.

When a pax tramped mud into his car and made a minor mess, Samoir didn't know which pax it was. But even if he had known then the pax would just lie and deny it. He didn't know which one of them it had been, and it didn't matter. All he cared about was getting paid. He not only picked a pax at random, he also embellished the report to claim that the mud was dog shit. His ethics code no longer applied and his moral compass was well on its way to becoming totally non-functional.

Early on in his rideshare escapades, he had returned pax items when he found them in his car. Then came the many encounters with the drunks. These sorry creatures who can't even retain consciousness, let alone their personal items. He came to hate how needy they were, and hated how utterly pathetic they were, losing their wits like that in public. One night a young lady was put into the back seat by another couple. She was the drunk third wheel, and Samoir was the garbage man who would be removing her. When he arrived at the lady's house it was hard to wake her up. When she did finally wake, she just stared blankly at him, looking around and not knowing where she was. Then she stumbled out of the car and walked zig-zag across the street in the vague direction of her house. Samoir stared after her in disgust, and reached around to the back seat to recover her phone. Whereas before he would have run after her to immediately return the item, that wasn't going to happen. Not this time. For being such a pathetic and disgusting drunk she would need to pay a price. As he returned home over one of the bay bridges, the iPhone was defenestrated, maybe temporarily restoring the balance of justice in some way. Either way, it made Samoir feel a little better.

Samoir would not have thought of ever asking for a reward to return items. But there were too many times when the pax just took the item, said "Thanks so much! This is incredible!". And then shut the door on him. To hell with them. Then Uber's $15 return fee was introduced. If it's an easy return, Samoir will do it. If not, tough luck.

Also gone were the days of patiently waiting for pax to come out of their houses or out of the bar, simply because those were the rules and "the right thing to do". That lasted a while, but finally enough was enough. If you order a damn car, then you come out of your house and get in the damn car. He found the way to shuffle pax and take 5 bucks from them without waiting. Was that the right thing to do or was that, in some way, stealing? He was past caring by this stage.

Honesty? Gone too. Pax want to be taken to the other side of the bay to SeventyCentsPerMileVille? Nope. He started to phone the pax and make up whatever lie to have them cancel. Pax would say that they wouldn't cancel because they would get charged. He assured them that they would not. He learned to say whatever it took. Again, tough luck.

Samoir went from being a decent, ethical guy to a reflection of Travis Bickle in the space of a few short months. If taxi drivers are known as being dishonest, grumpy and apathetic is it their fault? Or did their pax make them that way?

The final question: is Samoir forgiven?

I can see/justify this behavior if Samoir was on the verge of homelessness. Otherwise, contractors have to come up with a plan to counteract these hideous realities. Blame must rest with each of us, ultimately, unless we're put into a cage in a two-men-enter-one-man-leaves scenario.
 
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