This Is The End, Final Thoughts

crazytrain00

Active Member
(Not that anyone was asking...)

Yesterday was my final day with Uber. I fly out to Wisconsin on Monday to start an OTR trucking job.

Uber filled a gap when I needed it to, so it's not all bad. I never had a truly awful pax experience, and I only had one pax pass out in my car, which took about five minutes to deal with. No throwing up, no violence, and mostly okay people. I ferried a few pro sports guys down in OCMD, a few tech industry honchos in the NW suburbs of Philly, a stripper from Trenton, and tons of other "regular" (i.e. uninteresting) people. I never offered water or gum and had zero other gimmicks (no disco ball, no trivia games, etc.). The only thing I did was go from point A to point B in as timely a manner as I could control, and did so safely.

The driving part and being a decent person isn't rocket science, though it seems there are pretty terrible drivers out there from some of the pax horror storries I've heard. I always suggested they were probably cab company plants trying to make Uber drivers look bad. Uber can make itself look bad enough on its own, as we all know.

There are a few things I think Uber should take a long term view on, that perhaps they aren't considering. The most important being that the available pool of good drivers is finite, and should be treated as such. Enough bad press about the company will keep folks from ever driving for them. Never underestimate the power of word of mouth. Rates lower than $1.10/mile, gimmicky ideas like POOL, and hijacking 20%-25% of a fare that you played a pretty small part in fulfilling are all things that will keep better drivers away. If you keep bringing on just anyone with no form of testing or training, then the positive pax experience will decrease over time. The most thorough criminal and MVR background check is a woefully insufficient judge of character. Lyft barely does this better, but their vetting system is also extremely flawed for different reasons. I think they should pay some people good money to audit their driver pool regularly with spot checks for cleanliness and mechanical soundness (an annual PA inspection is insufficient when I put 12,000 miles on my car in six weeks), random rides to audit navigation ability, driving habits, and personability, and eventually perform random drug/alcohol testing. They should definitely implement mandatory break periods after eight hours online. You shouldn't be able to come back online for at least 30 minutes. Everyone thinks they are special and can drive 12+ hours a day. You aren't special, but you are a dangerous driver. I know these things will never happen because it sounds too much like an employer/employee relationship and they won't be popular with some of the less than savory drivers, but even doing one of them will eliminate some bad apples before they have the chance to create additional negative press.
 

Skyblue6

Active Member
(Not that anyone was asking...)

Yesterday was my final day with Uber. I fly out to Wisconsin on Monday to start an OTR trucking job.

Uber filled a gap when I needed it to, so it's not all bad. I never had a truly awful pax experience, and I only had one pax pass out in my car, which took about five minutes to deal with. No throwing up, no violence, and mostly okay people. I ferried a few pro sports guys down in OCMD, a few tech industry honchos in the NW suburbs of Philly, a stripper from Trenton, and tons of other "regular" (i.e. uninteresting) people. I never offered water or gum and had zero other gimmicks (no disco ball, no trivia games, etc.). The only thing I did was go from point A to point B in as timely a manner as I could control, and did so safely.

The driving part and being a decent person isn't rocket science, though it seems there are pretty terrible drivers out there from some of the pax horror storries I've heard. I always suggested they were probably cab company plants trying to make Uber drivers look bad. Uber can make itself look bad enough on its own, as we all know.

There are a few things I think Uber should take a long term view on, that perhaps they aren't considering. The most important being that the available pool of good drivers is finite, and should be treated as such. Enough bad press about the company will keep folks from ever driving for them. Never underestimate the power of word of mouth. Rates lower than $1.10/mile, gimmicky ideas like POOL, and hijacking 20%-25% of a fare that you played a pretty small part in fulfilling are all things that will keep better drivers away. If you keep bringing on just anyone with no form of testing or training, then the positive pax experience will decrease over time. The most thorough criminal and MVR background check is a woefully insufficient judge of character. Lyft barely does this better, but their vetting system is also extremely flawed for different reasons. I think they should pay some people good money to audit their driver pool regularly with spot checks for cleanliness and mechanical soundness (an annual PA inspection is insufficient when I put 12,000 miles on my car in six weeks), random rides to audit navigation ability, driving habits, and personability, and eventually perform random drug/alcohol testing. They should definitely implement mandatory break periods after eight hours online. You shouldn't be able to come back online for at least 30 minutes. Everyone thinks they are special and can drive 12+ hours a day. You aren't special, but you are a dangerous driver. I know these things will never happen because it sounds too much like an employer/employee relationship and they won't be popular with some of the less than savory drivers, but even doing one of them will eliminate some bad apples before they have the chance to create additional negative press.

Unfortunately all those points you stated involve spending money which goes against ubers business plan.
 

DelaJoe

Well-Known Member
Uber is a monster..
200,000 drivers in the USA..making an average of $750/week which comes out to $1.5B annually for Ubers cut.
More than 8 million use Uber worldwide
1 Billion rides as of 12/31/15
400 cities worldwide 70 countries
1 Million rides per day 12/31/14
50,000 new drivers added per month 12/31/14
 

FormerUber

Active Member
(Not that anyone was asking...)

Yesterday was my final day with Uber. I fly out to Wisconsin on Monday to start an OTR trucking job.

Uber filled a gap when I needed it to, so it's not all bad. I never had a truly awful pax experience, and I only had one pax pass out in my car, which took about five minutes to deal with. No throwing up, no violence, and mostly okay people. I ferried a few pro sports guys down in OCMD, a few tech industry honchos in the NW suburbs of Philly, a stripper from Trenton, and tons of other "regular" (i.e. uninteresting) people. I never offered water or gum and had zero other gimmicks (no disco ball, no trivia games, etc.). The only thing I did was go from point A to point B in as timely a manner as I could control, and did so safely.

The driving part and being a decent person isn't rocket science, though it seems there are pretty terrible drivers out there from some of the pax horror storries I've heard. I always suggested they were probably cab company plants trying to make Uber drivers look bad. Uber can make itself look bad enough on its own, as we all know.

There are a few things I think Uber should take a long term view on, that perhaps they aren't considering. The most important being that the available pool of good drivers is finite, and should be treated as such. Enough bad press about the company will keep folks from ever driving for them. Never underestimate the power of word of mouth. Rates lower than $1.10/mile, gimmicky ideas like POOL, and hijacking 20%-25% of a fare that you played a pretty small part in fulfilling are all things that will keep better drivers away. If you keep bringing on just anyone with no form of testing or training, then the positive pax experience will decrease over time. The most thorough criminal and MVR background check is a woefully insufficient judge of character. Lyft barely does this better, but their vetting system is also extremely flawed for different reasons. I think they should pay some people good money to audit their driver pool regularly with spot checks for cleanliness and mechanical soundness (an annual PA inspection is insufficient when I put 12,000 miles on my car in six weeks), random rides to audit navigation ability, driving habits, and personability, and eventually perform random drug/alcohol testing. They should definitely implement mandatory break periods after eight hours online. You shouldn't be able to come back online for at least 30 minutes. Everyone thinks they are special and can drive 12+ hours a day. You aren't special, but you are a dangerous driver. I know these things will never happen because it sounds too much like an employer/employee relationship and they won't be popular with some of the less than savory drivers, but even doing one of them will eliminate some bad apples before they have the chance to create additional negative press.
Which trucking company will you be driving for?
 

Shpinzy

Member
I drove step deck on all 48 for a few years. 25% per load. The freight is at all time low and the roads are saturated with trucks. At scales DOT bends backwards to find anything to give you violation tickets. Can't find a spot at truck stop after 4pm. Food is super expensive unless all you need is corn dogs and diet. Coke. Over the road trucking is not fun anymore since the late 90s. I had better gigs doing regional dedicated. Where I knew my routes and got home every 10 days. Local jobs are harder. they pay
so so
 

Gees2016

Well-Known Member
I drove step deck on all 48 for a few years. 25% per load. The freight is at all time low and the roads are saturated with trucks. At scales DOT bends backwards to find anything to give you violation tickets. Can't find a spot at truck stop after 4pm. Food is super expensive unless all you need is corn dogs and diet. Coke. Over the road trucking is not fun anymore since the late 90s. I had better gigs doing regional dedicated. Where I knew my routes and got home every 10 days. Local jobs are harder. they pay
so so
Was you an Owner Operator?
 

Shpinzy

Member
No Iam glad i was not an owner operator. Small companies are barely paying fuel costs. Bad times for trucking
 

Shpinzy

Member
(Not that anyone was asking...)

Yesterday was my final day with Uber. I fly out to Wisconsin on Monday to start an OTR trucking job.

Uber filled a gap when I needed it to, so it's not all bad. I never had a truly awful pax experience, and I only had one pax pass out in my car, which took about five minutes to deal with. No throwing up, no violence, and mostly okay people. I ferried a few pro sports guys down in OCMD, a few tech industry honchos in the NW suburbs of Philly, a stripper from Trenton, and tons of other "regular" (i.e. uninteresting) people. I never offered water or gum and had zero other gimmicks (no disco ball, no trivia games, etc.). The only thing I did was go from point A to point B in as timely a manner as I could control, and did so safely.

The driving part and being a decent person isn't rocket science, though it seems there are pretty terrible drivers out there from some of the pax horror storries I've heard. I always suggested they were probably cab company plants trying to make Uber drivers look bad. Uber can make itself look bad enough on its own, as we all know.

There are a few things I think Uber should take a long term view on, that perhaps they aren't considering. The most important being that the available pool of good drivers is finite, and should be treated as such. Enough bad press about the company will keep folks from ever driving for them. Never underestimate the power of word of mouth. Rates lower than $1.10/mile, gimmicky ideas like POOL, and hijacking 20%-25% of a fare that you played a pretty small part in fulfilling are all things that will keep better drivers away. If you keep bringing on just anyone with no form of testing or training, then the positive pax experience will decrease over time. The most thorough criminal and MVR background check is a woefully insufficient judge of character. Lyft barely does this better, but their vetting system is also extremely flawed for different reasons. I think they should pay some people good money to audit their driver pool regularly with spot checks for cleanliness and mechanical soundness (an annual PA inspection is insufficient when I put 12,000 miles on my car in six weeks), random rides to audit navigation ability, driving habits, and personability, and eventually perform random drug/alcohol testing. They should definitely implement mandatory break periods after eight hours online. You shouldn't be able to come back online for at least 30 minutes. Everyone thinks they are special and can drive 12+ hours a day. You aren't special, but you are a dangerous driver. I know these things will never happen because it sounds too much like an employer/employee relationship and they won't be popular with some of the less than savory drivers, but even doing one of them will eliminate some bad apples before they have the chance to create additional negative press.
I do not agree that adding more regulations on this gig would make it better . as you are sliding back to DOT hell, you feel the need to drag everyone else with you. This is ride sharing from one private citizen to another . no need to be on a Leach to be a good uber driver . get a Tesla with mr Belvedere at the wheel and pax will always find something to complain about. I do not like nannies . I do not like Nannie states. This uber thing should be on a monthly membership fee .like $70 a month instead of 25% a ride

Less regulations, the better
 

crazytrain00

Active Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #11
I agree with respect to regulation, seeing as it tends to do more harm than good. My disdain and desire to punish Uber for its poor financial outlook towards drivers caused me to have a knee jerk reaction. It would almost certainly have a downside for good drivers and would push ride sharing into the cab realm.
 

crazytrain00

Active Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #12
I drove step deck on all 48 for a few years. 25% per load. The freight is at all time low and the roads are saturated with trucks. At scales DOT bends backwards to find anything to give you violation tickets. Can't find a spot at truck stop after 4pm. Food is super expensive unless all you need is corn dogs and diet. Coke. Over the road trucking is not fun anymore since the late 90s. I had better gigs doing regional dedicated. Where I knew my routes and got home every 10 days. Local jobs are harder. they pay
so so
I heard DOT is bending over backwards to write violations up right now, especially in the lanes I'll mostly be operating in (coming down around Chicago and heading east/southeast). I'm with a reefer company, and they have strong freight at the moment. I couldn't find a bad word about this place. It's not really that small, about 800 employees, with a little more than half of those being drivers. They rarely operate west of the Rockies/Cascades. I have the option of going for an Eastern regional gig with them if I don't like OTR.
 
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