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This California city just voted to give a $30 minimum wage to Uber and Lyft drivers

KevinH

Well-Known Member

El Monte, east of Los Angeles, wants to make sure drivers have enough to pay for gas and maintenance and then make $15 an hour on top of that.

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[Photo: courtesy Mobile Workers Alliance]

BY ADELE PETERS
2 MINUTE READ

In Los Angeles County, where the minimum wage is currently $14.25 an hour, studies suggest that Uber and Lyft drivers often make far less. In El Monte, an industrial city east of Los Angeles, the city council just unanimously voted to change that, telling city officials to begin drafting a law that would guarantee drivers a minimum of $30 an hour.

While other cities have set minimum wages for ride-hail drivers, this would be the highest in the country, and it comes after pressure from the Mobile Workers Alliance, a project from the Service Employees International Union, Local 721. “Currently, workers who are working for companies like Uber and Lyft are working lots of hours and still making less than minimum wage,” says Coral Itzcalli, an organizer for the union. “On average, we hear from workers that they’re working daily 12 to 16 hours a day. That translates to tired people behind the wheel on already congested public roads. And no one should put their life or the life of someone else at risk by being so tired behind the wheel just because they’re trying to earn the pennies on the dollar that Uber and Lyft is paying them.”

[Photo: courtesy Mobile Workers Alliance]

The pay might sound generous, but it’s intended to provide drivers with $15 an hour to cover the costs of operating their cars and another $15 in take-home pay. Itzcalli says that drivers have to cover the cost of gas, frequent oil changes and other maintenance because they’re driving so many miles, and extra insurance because standard car insurance doesn’t cover ride-hail drivers (Lyft says drivers are covered by the company when they are in driver mode). Many drivers have to work a week and a half just to cover the basic operating expenses of driving. A recent study from the Economic Policy Institute found that the average hourly wage for Uber drivers was just $11.77. The union’s own surveys suggest it’s actually closer to $8-9 an hour in the area.
“California is one of the most expensive states to live in,” says Itzcalli. “Housing is very, very expensive. Many of these folks are just one paycheck away from being homeless. We already have a homeless crisis. It is something that we all feel is urgent, because we cannot continue to allow these companies to drive our communities to the ground.”

City officials will have 120 days to develop the new ordinance, which will likely require another vote. Lyft, in response, offered a boilerplate statement that didn’t address El Monte specifically and won’t say what they calculate the hourly rate of drivers in El Monte. The company offered some broader figures: That in California drivers makes $30 an hour for “booked hours,” the time between when a driver books a trip and when they drop the passenger off. In the greater Los Angeles area, the company says drivers spend roughly 90% of their time “booked,” which would mean a roughly $27 per-hour wage before expenses like gas and depreciation. (Uber did not respond to requests for comment). In the meantime, a separate state bill is making its way to the governor that would force companies like Uber and Lyft to classify drivers as employees, not independent contractors.
 

goneubering

Well-Known Member

El Monte, east of Los Angeles, wants to make sure drivers have enough to pay for gas and maintenance and then make $15 an hour on top of that.

View attachment 343431
[Photo: courtesy Mobile Workers Alliance]

BY ADELE PETERS
2 MINUTE READ

In Los Angeles County, where the minimum wage is currently $14.25 an hour, studies suggest that Uber and Lyft drivers often make far less. In El Monte, an industrial city east of Los Angeles, the city council just unanimously voted to change that, telling city officials to begin drafting a law that would guarantee drivers a minimum of $30 an hour.

While other cities have set minimum wages for ride-hail drivers, this would be the highest in the country, and it comes after pressure from the Mobile Workers Alliance, a project from the Service Employees International Union, Local 721. “Currently, workers who are working for companies like Uber and Lyft are working lots of hours and still making less than minimum wage,” says Coral Itzcalli, an organizer for the union. “On average, we hear from workers that they’re working daily 12 to 16 hours a day. That translates to tired people behind the wheel on already congested public roads. And no one should put their life or the life of someone else at risk by being so tired behind the wheel just because they’re trying to earn the pennies on the dollar that Uber and Lyft is paying them.”

[Photo: courtesy Mobile Workers Alliance]

The pay might sound generous, but it’s intended to provide drivers with $15 an hour to cover the costs of operating their cars and another $15 in take-home pay. Itzcalli says that drivers have to cover the cost of gas, frequent oil changes and other maintenance because they’re driving so many miles, and extra insurance because standard car insurance doesn’t cover ride-hail drivers (Lyft says drivers are covered by the company when they are in driver mode). Many drivers have to work a week and a half just to cover the basic operating expenses of driving. A recent study from the Economic Policy Institute found that the average hourly wage for Uber drivers was just $11.77. The union’s own surveys suggest it’s actually closer to $8-9 an hour in the area.
“California is one of the most expensive states to live in,” says Itzcalli. “Housing is very, very expensive. Many of these folks are just one paycheck away from being homeless. We already have a homeless crisis. It is something that we all feel is urgent, because we cannot continue to allow these companies to drive our communities to the ground.”

City officials will have 120 days to develop the new ordinance, which will likely require another vote. Lyft, in response, offered a boilerplate statement that didn’t address El Monte specifically and won’t say what they calculate the hourly rate of drivers in El Monte. The company offered some broader figures: That in California drivers makes $30 an hour for “booked hours,” the time between when a driver books a trip and when they drop the passenger off. In the greater Los Angeles area, the company says drivers spend roughly 90% of their time “booked,” which would mean a roughly $27 per-hour wage before expenses like gas and depreciation. (Uber did not respond to requests for comment). In the meantime, a separate state bill is making its way to the governor that would force companies like Uber and Lyft to classify drivers as employees, not independent contractors.
I don’t see this happening.
 

Ignatz

Well-Known Member
All they voted for is the poor now forced to take the Bus
while local uber drivers will whither and die.

Probably town's local rich folk didn't like a mass of Uber cars and the sleazy drivers causing traffic and blocking their Mercedes.
So, they figured out

A. increase driver earnings
B. subsequently fares need to increase
C. Fares now Not AFFORDABLE for the average rider
D. That rider will be forced on the bus
E. Less riders means less uber cars

success

Still Loving it @uberdriverfornow ??
 
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ghrdrd

Well-Known Member
All they voted for is the poor now forced to take the Bus
while local uber drivers will whither and die.

Probably town's local rich folk didn't like a mass of Uber cars and the sleazy drivers causing traffic and blocking their Mercedes.
So, they figured out

A. increase driver earnings
B. subsequently fares need to increase
C. Fares now Not AFFORDABLE for the average rider
D. That rider will be forced on the bus
E. Less riders means less uber cars

success

Still Loving it @uberdriverfornow ??
Perfect plan.
If only more cities would do it now to cull the vermin ridehsare cars by 70%
 

Ignatz

Well-Known Member
This is intriguing - How would the drivers die if they'll make (by law) $30 per hour?
Let’s try it again @jocker12 ,UP resident Hate everything and blame everything on Uber.

A. increase driver earnings
B. subsequently fares need to increase?
C. Fares now ?Not AFFORDABLE? for the average rider
D. That rider will be forced on the bus ?
E. Less riders means less uber cars (whither and die)

Result of increased Driver Earnings

 

jocker12

Well-Known Member
Let’s try it again @jocker12 ,UP resident Hate everything and blame everything on Uber.

A. increase driver earnings
B. subsequently fares need to increase?
C. Fares now ?Not AFFORDABLE? for the average rider
D. That rider will be forced on the bus ?
E. Less riders means less uber cars (whither and die)
Let's try to be more specific - all drivers are gonna die?
 

Uber's Guber

Well-Known Member
This is intriguing - How would the drivers die if they'll make (by law) $30 per hour?
They'd die by drinking themselves to death on their last big paycheck. If not, they blew their last check and now have to go work elsewhere because Uber will simply bail out of El Monte. I hear tent space is filling up fast in San Francisco.
 

jocker12

Well-Known Member
They'd die by drinking themselves to death on their last big paycheck. If not, they blew their last check and now have to go work elsewhere because Uber will simply bail out of El Monte. I hear tent space is filling up fast in San Francisco.
All of them?
 

jocker12

Well-Known Member
De nuevo, ¿no lo entiendes?
Ignatz is explaining that local Uber drivers will be out of business in El Monte because rideshare will die off.
I'll bet you believe we're all going to die from climate change in 10 years because AOC says so. :biggrin:
Would you agree Uber drivers FROM EL MONTE (zip codes 91731, 91732 and 91733) are not limited to driving only within El Monte's city limits, and they could driver further away with technically no geographical limitations as long as the roads exist?

Annotation 2019-08-10 220742.jpg
 
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Uber's Guber

Well-Known Member
Would you agree Uber drivers FROM EL MONTE (zip codes 91731, 91732 and 91733) are not limited to driving only within El Monte's city limits, and they could driver further away with technically no geographical limitations as long as the roads exist?
The officials at the city of El Monte have no real weight in this. Uber can geo-fence El Monte, or they'll disable pings to drivers possessing an El Monte address, or ping neighboring drivers into El Monte to service the area. Uber has plenty options, and if you think a bench load of city council snowflakes will have the final dictate how Uber operates, you're in for a big surprise.
 

jocker12

Well-Known Member
The officials at the city of El Monte have no real weight in this. Uber can geo-fence El Monte, or they'll disable pings to drivers possessing an El Monte address, or ping neighboring drivers into El Monte to service the area. Uber has plenty options, and if you think a bench load of city council snowflakes will have the final dictate how Uber operates, you're in for a big surprise.
Please answer the question - Would you agree Uber drivers FROM EL MONTE (zip codes 91731, 91732 and 91733) are not limited to driving only within El Monte's city limits, and they could drive further away with technically no geographical limitations as long as the roads exist?
 

Uber's Guber

Well-Known Member
Please answer the question - Would you agree Uber drivers FROM EL MONTE (zip codes 91731, 91732 and 91733) are not limited to driving only within El Monte's city limits, and they could driver further away with technically no geographical limitations as long as the roads exist?
I believe Uber drivers FROM EL MONTE (zip codes 91731, 91732 and 917330) will become deactivated from using the app. Pretty simple.
 

jocker12

Well-Known Member
I believe Uber drivers FROM EL MONTE (zip codes 91731, 91732 and 917330) will become deactivated from using the app. Pretty simple.
So if they want, at this point in time, they could drive further away with technically no geographical limitations as long as the roads exist?

Edit - And I want to help you a little - As a public company, as Uber is today, would you agree there is a possibility they could have shareholders residing in El Monte, possibly driving for Uber?
 
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Uber's Guber

Well-Known Member
So if they want, at this point in time, they could drive further away with technically no geographical limitations as long as the roads exist?
Sure, people fro El Monte they can drive anywhere they want as long as roads exist. They just won't be able to activate the app any longer, because the app will no longer exist for them. It's called deactivation. Pretty simple.
 

jocker12

Well-Known Member
Sure, people fro El Monte they can drive anywhere they want as long as roads exist. They just won't be able to activate the app any longer, because the app will no longer exist for them. It's called deactivation. Pretty simple.
Uber can geofence an area, but if they do not deactivate the drivers, they cannot geofence the drivers, so the drivers can go out of the geofenced area and go online. Do you think that is a possibility?
Sorry I've edited my comment and you probably missed it - As a public company, as Uber is today, would you agree there is a possibility they could have shareholders residing in El Monte, possibly driving for Uber?
 
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