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The worst driver scam of all

If you read a few stories on UP you will quickly learn that there are plenty of scams that an occasional slimy passengers (pax) may pull on drivers in order to get a free ride. Some of the common ones include claiming that the driver was threatening, drunk or made inappropriate comments, the ride never occurred, or perhaps the driver was touching or stalking the pax.

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The worst driver scam of all doesn’t involve passengers, and if you are a driver and don’t know about this, then it’s time to get educated! I wrote this article for YOU.

This one is a money scam. I had it attempted on me (while driving Uber) about a year ago, and wrote about it in another Article. Recently it happened again, this time while driving Lyft.

I did not get taken by this scam. Thankfully, it was because of reading UberPeople.net threads that I became aware of this. When the scam started, I immediately suspected foul play, and was prepared.


Here is the scam: You get a ride request. The pax calls you and claims to work for the company (Uber or Lyft), and says that there is a problem with your account, or that they want to give you a bonus for being such a good worker. You need to pull over to a safe place to talk. Then you need to cancel the ride, make sure you don’t charge the customer. Then you need to verify who you are (to them). They get enough information from you to log in to your driver account (while you are on the phone). They quickly change the email, password, and bank info. Then they drain your pay using InstantPay. Boom, everything you made that week is gone.

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Pretty clever, huh? Okay, so what can you do about it…

  • Be smart. Understand that if you do get a call from someone who claims to work for the company, they will NEVER ask you to verify your info. And they wouldn’t call you through a pax customer line.
  • If you are not sure if the caller is a con artist, you should ask THEM to verify who YOU are. Anyone who really does work for corporate will have your last name, and they will have your phone number. Those are two simple things that a true rep will have that a scammer will not. Whatever you do, don’t give those out!
  • Wait out the 5 minutes and collect your cancel fee. On Lyft, make sure you hang up and call them back during that time, so you don’t get shafted on the cancel fee. Also, make sure you play them out for at least two minutes (from the time you accepted the ride), because if they cancel the ride within 2 minutes of ordering it, you get nothing.
  • Immediately notify the company that someone tried to scam you. This one is so important… your timing may save countless other drivers from being scammed! The sooner they shut off the scammer’s account, the better. Yes, the thieves will make a new account, but the harder it is for them to steal from drivers, the better.

Okay, so in anticipation of some of the comments and responses, here are a couple more thoughts.

You might think: Never answer the phone when a pax calls

325468


That may work for some drivers but I prefer to make my job easier. Pax rarely call, and when they do I have found it is for a good reason. They are often calling to ask if it is okay to have an animal, or tell me that the pin drop is off by XX blocks, or to tell me that I am picking up someone’s daughter/husband/friend and their name is _____. I appreciate those calls, and will answer the phone for a pax whenever I can. Also, if there is an “issue” (like attitude or extended wait time), I would prefer to find this out before I drive there to pick them up. But that’s just me. If you ignore all pax calls and that works for you, more power to you.

You might think: A real person from Uber or Lyft would NEVER call a driver

Not true. One time a woman left her phone in my car. I told her I would meet up with her when I got to her neighborhood, although I have no idea when that will be. Drove an entire Friday afternoon and evening without hitting that suburb. Saturday she went to the GLH (GreenLight Hub) and asked for help. A local GLH manager called me directly and asked if I would bring the phone to the GLH. The manager never tried to verify my info; and we got it all worked out.

I have also had multiple people who work directly for Lyft contact me over the years, for one reason or another. Most recently, from Trust and Safety to find out about this incident!

The point? It IS possible that someone who works directly for the company might actually call you.

You might think: Uber or Lyft will reimburse me, they don’t want the negative publicity or potential legal problems.

No, Uber and Lyft will not reimburse you. You got hit with a scam, they didn’t cause it. They know you’re not going to get anywhere wasting even more time and money trying to go after them for something that is clearly not their fault. In fact, they might secretly wish that you do take it to the media, in the hopes that it builds awareness among other drivers to be more careful. Honestly, you have a better chance of winning a lawsuit against McDonald’s for making you fat.

I have talked with past drivers who have been hit with versions of this scam, and some of them actually have been reimbursed by Uber. But that was years ago, when Uber would pay outrageous driver bonuses and even pay for parking tickets (or so I’ve heard). Nowadays, you’re lucky if you can get a dang cancel fee!


After the incident…

So I called Lyft and pushed the buttons to report a “critical issue”. To Lyft’s credit, I was connected to a human being in SECONDS. I was totally floored! Hooray Lyft, you finally got something right!

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But the happiness quickly faded. As soon as I got off the phone with Lyft they sent me a generic email telling me that there was an investigation. For their safety and mine, they logged me out and I needed to log back in again to drive. Okay, no problem – or so I thought. In order to log in I needed to provide a verification code. This “technology company” didn’t send the code for a good 15 minutes. Here I am, trying to make money in the middle of a Saturday night, pushing “Resend Code” over and over and I can’t log in for 15 minutes. WTH, Lyft??


And shortly after that…

I told the condensed version of what happened to most of my pax that night. One pax works in the legal department at AirBnB. She says that exact same scam happens frequently to their hosts. Someone calls up, pretends to be from the company, gets their info, gets into the account, and drains all the money. What’s worse is when the scammer gets ahold of a company that’s doing AirBnB as a business. The fraud may not even be noticed by the host company for MONTHS! So, if you are an AirBnB host, look out for this scam in your other side business as well, people.



That is all.

Stay safe; try and have fun.
 
Mr T

TBone

Well-Known Member
I believe Uber will no longer send funds to a recently changed bank account. I recently signed up for instant pay and received an email warning about the change and couldn't send funds for a couple of days. Financial Institutions have done this for decades and I am surprised Uber ever allowed it to happen
 

kc ub'ing!

Well-Known Member
I kept dingus on the line long enough to get my cancel fee during my scam attempt. A proud day indeed, scamming a scammer! Like T I owe thanks to this site for the heads up.

And it’s not old news! There are plenty of new drivers who will benefit from T’s thoughtful council.
 

treesweets dancer

Well-Known Member
I don't understand why people fall for it. As soon as a stranger on the phone says they're from Uber, then asks u for information that an Uber rep would already have, wouldn't u be suspicious? Maybe I'm just too dumb to fall for it, cuz I don't get jow stuff works.

And an Uber rep saying "cancel the ride yr on". Uber tells us not to cancel rides. & If they want to bonus me, they'll just add it in the app. Why would they bother calling about that, like I'm so special among the million drivers that they were calling me to give me an individual special bonus?


I haven't received a call in 3 years. But when it happened to me, the riderxs name was Sarah (female anyways). & the call came from the rider (it's the number riders called me from back then). It was a male voice so I pretended I was a dumb hick, stupid accent & everything. & that I didn't get that he just said he was from Uber office. All I knew was my rider just called me, so this must be Sarah.

He tried to tell me he is from Uber, but I kept asking "Is this Sarah. U soun like a man. U wunna dem transecksuals I been hearin about."

He & his friend started laughing & said "can u believe this n-word-a-not-er" & hung up. My service doesn't allow me to use the phone & have data simultaneously, so I can't start a trip while on the phone.

Otherwise u should keep them on the phone, start trip, & drive. At least to get a min fare out of it. Pretend u won a prize off the scammer. Alerting Uber will probably just result in a robo msg saying "this ride does not qualify for a cancel fee. In order to receive a fee u must......if u need any further help....."
Further help, Uber? Really? U haven't helped a first time yet.
 

25rides7daysaweek

Well-Known Member
If you read a few stories on UP you will quickly learn that there are plenty of scams that an occasional slimy passengers (pax) may pull on drivers in order to get a free ride. Some of the common ones include claiming that the driver was threatening, drunk or made inappropriate comments, the ride never occurred, or perhaps the driver was touching or stalking the pax.

View attachment 325464

The worst driver scam of all doesn’t involve passengers, and if you are a driver and don’t know about this, then it’s time to get educated! I wrote this article for YOU.

This one is a money scam. I had it attempted on me (while driving Uber) about a year ago, and wrote about it in another Article. Recently it happened again, this time while driving Lyft.

I did not get taken by this scam. Thankfully, it was because of reading UberPeople.net threads that I became aware of this. When the scam started, I immediately suspected foul play, and was prepared.


Here is the scam: You get a ride request. The pax calls you and claims to work for the company (Uber or Lyft), and says that there is a problem with your account, or that they want to give you a bonus for being such a good worker. You need to pull over to a safe place to talk. Then you need to cancel the ride, make sure you don’t charge the customer. Then you need to verify who you are (to them). They get enough information from you to log in to your driver account (while you are on the phone). They quickly change the email, password, and bank info. Then they drain your pay using InstantPay. Boom, everything you made that week is gone.

View attachment 325467

Pretty clever, huh? Okay, so what can you do about it…

  • Be smart. Understand that if you do get a call from someone who claims to work for the company, they will NEVER ask you to verify your info. And they wouldn’t call you through a pax customer line.
  • If you are not sure if the caller is a con artist, you should ask THEM to verify who YOU are. Anyone who really does work for corporate will have your last name, and they will have your phone number. Those are two simple things that a true rep will have that a scammer will not. Whatever you do, don’t give those out!
  • Wait out the 5 minutes and collect your cancel fee. On Lyft, make sure you hang up and call them back during that time, so you don’t get shafted on the cancel fee. Also, make sure you play them out for at least two minutes (from the time you accepted the ride), because if they cancel the ride within 2 minutes of ordering it, you get nothing.
  • Immediately notify the company that someone tried to scam you. This one is so important… your timing may save countless other drivers from being scammed! The sooner they shut off the scammer’s account, the better. Yes, the thieves will make a new account, but the harder it is for them to steal from drivers, the better.

Okay, so in anticipation of some of the comments and responses, here are a couple more thoughts.

You might think: Never answer the phone when a pax calls

View attachment 325468

That may work for some drivers but I prefer to make my job easier. Pax rarely call, and when they do I have found it is for a good reason. They are often calling to ask if it is okay to have an animal, or tell me that the pin drop is off by XX blocks, or to tell me that I am picking up someone’s daughter/husband/friend and their name is _____. I appreciate those calls, and will answer the phone for a pax whenever I can. Also, if there is an “issue” (like attitude or extended wait time), I would prefer to find this out before I drive there to pick them up. But that’s just me. If you ignore all pax calls and that works for you, more power to you.

You might think: A real person from Uber or Lyft would NEVER call a driver

Not true. One time a woman left her phone in my car. I told her I would meet up with her when I got to her neighborhood, although I have no idea when that will be. Drove an entire Friday afternoon and evening without hitting that suburb. Saturday she went to the GLH (GreenLight Hub) and asked for help. A local GLH manager called me directly and asked if I would bring the phone to the GLH. The manager never tried to verify my info; and we got it all worked out.

I have also had multiple people who work directly for Lyft contact me over the years, for one reason or another. Most recently, from Trust and Safety to find out about this incident!

The point? It IS possible that someone who works directly for the company might actually call you.

You might think: Uber or Lyft will reimburse me, they don’t want the negative publicity or potential legal problems.

No, Uber and Lyft will not reimburse you. You got hit with a scam, they didn’t cause it. They know you’re not going to get anywhere wasting even more time and money trying to go after them for something that is clearly not their fault. In fact, they might secretly wish that you do take it to the media, in the hopes that it builds awareness among other drivers to be more careful. Honestly, you have a better chance of winning a lawsuit against McDonald’s for making you fat.

I have talked with past drivers who have been hit with versions of this scam, and some of them actually have been reimbursed by Uber. But that was years ago, when Uber would pay outrageous driver bonuses and even pay for parking tickets (or so I’ve heard). Nowadays, you’re lucky if you can get a dang cancel fee!


After the incident…

So I called Lyft and pushed the buttons to report a “critical issue”. To Lyft’s credit, I was connected to a human being in SECONDS. I was totally floored! Hooray Lyft, you finally got something right!

View attachment 325469

But the happiness quickly faded. As soon as I got off the phone with Lyft they sent me a generic email telling me that there was an investigation. For their safety and mine, they logged me out and I needed to log back in again to drive. Okay, no problem – or so I thought. In order to log in I needed to provide a verification code. This “technology company” didn’t send the code for a good 15 minutes. Here I am, trying to make money in the middle of a Saturday night, pushing “Resend Code” over and over and I can’t log in for 15 minutes. WTH, Lyft??


And shortly after that…

I told the condensed version of what happened to most of my pax that night. One pax works in the legal department at AirBnB. She says that exact same scam happens frequently to their hosts. Someone calls up, pretends to be from the company, gets their info, gets into the account, and drains all the money. What’s worse is when the scammer gets ahold of a company that’s doing AirBnB as a business. The fraud may not even be noticed by the host company for MONTHS! So, if you are an AirBnB host, look out for this scam in your other side business as well, people.



That is all.

Stay safe; try and have fun.
I drag them out on the phone then pick up the ride and drive it 🤣. It usually happens during a surge and they cant complain... ITS A WIN - WIN!!!!
Post automatically merged:

I've had two such calls while driving Uber, and one with Lyft. They're easy to address.

First, just HANG UP. Cancell the ride, Contact support and report the attempt. Ask them to cancel the account as a safety measure.
We all know how inept they are though.. Way too many times when complaining to them the DRIVER ends up investigated. Unfortunately for that reason ide be very hesitant to attempt to report anything that wasnt life threatening to them...
 

MoreTips

Well-Known Member
This scam has been around for a long time and unfortunately due to the high driver churn rate it has a fairly high success rate. My guess is these are former drivers still trying to get their side hustle on.

I recieved the scam call over 2 years ago (Uber), thanks to UberPeople I was immediately suspicious, as soon as I was asked to end the current ride and verify my account for my bonus I told the caller "one moment please, I have a tire going flat and just pulled into a gas station and put my last bit of change into the air compressor so I'll be right back to confirm my account info" I laughed and danced around my car for a few minutes then got back in the car and proceeded to aggravate the scammer until he finally canceled. It still brings a smile to my face.

If you do this long enough it will be attempted on every driver at some point. Just don't fall for it.
 

xgamrgeekx

Active Member
I love taking scam calls and messing with the scammer. Bring it on! Though in 7 months of driving I’ve not even had a pax try to cancel mid ride. *shrug*

Thanks for the heads up, though. Something to keep in mind when I take pax calls.
 

Lissetti

Honey Badger
Article Manager
Moderator
I used to get these calls near every 3 months when I was a noob. I never fell for it though. My last time I got the call, was my favorite.

"Hello Lissetti?":smiles:

Yes?

"Hi this is Derek at Uber Technologies. I'm just calling to inform you that you are doing an outstanding job and as a reward, We'd like to give you a $200. bonus which will be available to you on your next pay day."😁

"Oh thank yooooooou!" 🤨🙄


"I just need you to pull over safely and cancel the ride you are on."

I never pulled over but kept the car moving and didn't cancel the ride. I was only a mile away from the pick up spot.

"Can I just ask you to verify your email, password for security purposes?"

"But you are Uber. You should know that."🤔

"Yes! ....Yes! We just need you to verify that information though."😦

At first I was having fun with them but quickly they were wasting my time because I suddenly I saw a surge icon appear at the top of my app, indicating there was a surge nearby (Back in the day.)

"Look, its been fun, but I'm done with you! I may be in Seattle right now, but I am Italian and from Bensonhurst Brooklyn. If you don't lose my number this minute, I'm going to make a phone call of my own and pretty soon you are going to get a visit from some people you really don't want to meet. 😴🐟🐠

"I know where you live....you @@@..............."

(Click!)


"Hello?":cautious:


I sat outside for another minute to watch the blinds move aside slightly in the upper window of the duplex where the ping came from. 😶

I waved....with one finger... The blinds quickly moved back into place. :eek::eek: I then canceled and went on to chase that weak 1.3 surge 2 miles away. (Was still a noob.)🤪




Recently we all know both Uber and Lyft has that automated voice that comes on at the beginning of the phone call when its from Pax.

"Hello, this is a call from your passenger.."

However I have still heard of drivers getting scammed either because they didn't have their Bluetooth fully enabled at the beginning of the phone call and missed that into message, or their English comprehension wasn't that great. I'm guessing in the case of the latter, if the scammers were actually able to get money out of those drivers, they really had to work for it.
 

Julescase2

New Member
Very Old news here is audio recording of the scam

Good for the newbies I guess


THAT is what these drivers are actually falling for??!! I’m sorry, but the “Uber Customer Service” rep (aka the person trying to pull the scam) sounded like a frigging MORON and made no sense AND was ridiculous.

The sad and equally atrocious thing is, I’d bet dollars to donuts that the people behind these scams are other rideshare drivers. They know how the Uber payment setup is handled and they know how absolutely DESPERATE drivers are for money and acknowledgment that they’re excelling........

But guys I’m sorry.....I’ve read about these scams countless times and the people posting the stories (the drivers who fell for the scam) always say how professional and convincing the callers sound. Ummm....the dingleberry in this video sounded like a drowned sewer rat who was about to wet himself. I can’t tell from the recording if the driver was falling for the scam or if he was just playing along, but that scammer caller sounded like a complete numbskull.
 
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