The Ponzi Scheme of the Rideshare Industry

Triculí

Active Member
Rideshare companies are abusing a deregulated industry in order to compete with each other and exploit drivers with very low rates. That is no longer a secret in the business world. Everybody knows it. Uber and Lyft are at war for the big pie of ride sharing. Both companies keep losing exorbitant amounts of money every year. $600 million for Lyft, $2.8 billion for Uber in 2016 alone. Who can offer the lowest fares to customers? How many trips can they subsidize? Competition is ferocious.

But competitiveness is not transparent, is not honest, not at all. The FBI is currently investigating Uber over a defunct program called 'Hell' that allegedly was used to interfere illegally with Lyft. The rideshare war is for real. The trend of the war has been lowering rates and subsidizing trips mostly on pools-lines (so ridiculously cheap) losing billions of dollars in the process all in the name of this unscrupulous competition. They take that route over raising fares and paying drivers better. Upfront pricing which is nothing more than charging riders whatever they feel like it while paying drivers based on miles and minutes turned out to be a gold mine. Why is such abusive practice even legal is beyond me.

giphy (10).gif


RideShareGuy founder Harry Campbell worked with Data & Society researcher Alex Rosenblat to analyze five weeks of earnings from an Uber driver in New York who agreed to share his data. Over 165 trips from early March to early April, Uber overcharged this driver’s passengers by a total of $85.54. Clearly the total upfront fares paid by riders were that much higher than the fares used to calculate driver pay.

Upfront pricing is not the only scam. The manipulation and suppression of the surge is quickly becoming one of their main tricks. Manipulation, create surges to move ants to a desired area, once that zone is covered with enough drivers the surge disappear or is lowered, only for the drivers. Fake surges, drivers can see the surge in the map, 3.5x, 2.0x can feel it, wait 20+ minutes. Surge? Not really! Is an optical illusion, a fugazi.

Obviously, they still charge passengers based on the high surge pricing while drivers get a lower one or simply base fare. Nationwide oversaturation of drivers is laying the groundwork to completely get rid of the surge. Uber's marketing department is at full force with their 'Get your side hustle on!' ad campaign on Internet, radio and TV. They clearly have a plan and is not good for workers.

Ironically, drivers, the foundation and soul of this industry are the ones at the bottom receiving the worst treatment. Why? Simply because there's no regulation and companies can do pretty much whatever they want in the race to turn a profit.

Hamish Douglass, cofounder of the Magellan Financial Group, which manages more than $37 billion, said in May that capital-raising ponzi scheme Uber has a less than 1% chance of surviving the next decade. I couldn't agree more. I think it's easy to make these predictions when all a company does is to lose billions every year maintaining its operations by robbing Peter to pay Paul. Uber would've made Charles Ponzi proud.

The rideshare industry still has an ace up their sleeves, its ultimate dream: Self Driving Cars. Running their business investing only in self driving technology and vehicles to keep all the profits? They are all for it. That's their only hope to survive.

pols_feature32.jpg

We are more focused on Uber mainly because of their role as the clear leader of the industry but Lyft is guilty of the same crimes. In fact, their unethical and questionable tactics are even worse than Uber in my honest opinion. Starting with their shady app. The difference with Lyft is that they have been pretty successful developing an effective facade of looking like the nicer and fairer deal. They mastered the art of deception and are making billions with it. Same game, different players. What about drivers? What are they doing as a collective to fight for better rates and working conditions? Except for Seattle drivers, not too much.

I drive part time in the Boston market. I just don't understand why a group of veteran drivers in this city think it's ok to glorify driving 80+ hours a week for a living and call that a success. It isn't as much as they wanna tell themselves otherwise. In the United States of America driving 70-80+ hours a week for a living is NOT even close to be considered a success. Period!

These drivers may find their screenshots to be high but the toll on their mental and physical health due to a lot of hours at the wheel is even higher. Pool-lines, $0.96 per mile, no benefits, taxes, all maintenance and expenses on the driver, depreciation of their vehicles, laughable incentives, etc., etc.. What a sweet deal rideshare companies have. There is a reason why Seattle drivers want to unionize. These companies are getting away with murder.

I don't know about the rest of the country but in Boston a full time driver needs to basically live in his/her car and have little to no social-family life in order to turn a decent profit. Most trips in the city are 4 miles or less, $8.00 on average for Uber X. What about airport rides? There are literally four miles from Logan airport to Downtown Boston, five to Cambridge, where a good chunk of the rides end up.

On the other hand, the risks of sitting in your car for long periods of time are many. Driving is the new smoking, a silent killer taking away so many lives every year slowly and without noise. If you as a full time driver are not eating healthy and exercising on a daily basis chances are that you are going to spend a good chunk of your earnings on healthcare. How many full time drivers after working 12+ hours a day are going to exercise? Crickets!

Yes, what are you going to do if you get diagnosed with a serious illness and can't work as a result, hence unable to pay for your health insurance? Use your wife or parents coverage? Claim a disability in order to collect a SE tax Social Security check? You better have plenty of savings because if that happens you are on your own.

1-5TMSeO_24RbZDOsBbFmONA.jpeg


In a gig historically led by immigrants, retirees, the uneducated, hippies and vagabonds we are very well aware about the general perception of society when it comes to the average cab driver let alone a rideshare driver a service 40% cheaper than traditional cabbies.

Drivers need to wake up and fight for their rights. $1.90 per mile, higher base fare, better working conditions and benefits. A Rideshare Revolution is what we need. This Independent Contractor BS is nothing but a convenient and powerful tool used by ridesharing companies to take advantage of an unregulated industry. Simple as that.

Driving crazy hours and feeling and treating ridesharing like a business is not going to change the fact that it is still a low wage, low skill, low rank, underappreciated gig and they are cooking you like a steak in a grill. How many of you would want your wife, girlfriend, mother, daughter or siblings doing rideshare full time? Saturday night, full of drunks anybody?


200w.gif


As drivers what can we do to help the cause?

You can start by contacting your local state Public Utility Commission President and politely ask what steps are being taken to ensure drivers are paid a fare wage for a hazardous taxing job?

Massachusetts PUC President
Angela O'Connor
Tel: (617) 305-3500
Fax: (617) 345-9102
[email protected]

California CPUC President
Michael Picker
415-703-2444
http://www.cpuc.ca.gov/picker/
 
Last edited:

Rammmmin

Well-Known Member
This reminds me of persian impression : knife doesn't cut its handle . It means they are all part of the system.
 

Bleach

Well-Known Member
Rideshare companies are abusing a deregulated industry in order to compete with each other and exploit drivers with very low rates. That is no longer a secret in the business world. Everybody knows it. Uber and Lyft are at war for the big pie of ride sharing. Both companies keep losing exorbitant amounts of money every year. $600 million for Lyft, $2.8 billion for Uber in 2016 alone. Who can offer the lowest fares to customers? How many trips can they subsidize? Competition is ferocious.

But competitiveness is not transparent, is not honest, not at all. The FBI is currently investigating Uber over a defunct program called 'Hell' that allegedly was used to interfere illegally with Lyft. The rideshare war is for real. The trend of the war has been lowering rates and subsidizing trips mostly on pools-lines (so ridiculously cheap) losing billions of dollars in the process all in the name of this unscrupulous competition. They take that route over raising fares and paying drivers better. Upfront pricing which is nothing more than charging riders whatever they feel like it while paying drivers based on miles and minutes turned out to be a gold mine. Why is such abusive practice even legal is beyond me.

View attachment 157583

RideShareGuy founder Harry Campbell worked with Data & Society researcher Alex Rosenblat to analyze five weeks of earnings from an Uber driver in New York who agreed to share his data. Over 165 trips from early March to early April, Uber overcharged this driver’s passengers by a total of $85.54. Clearly the total upfront fares paid by riders were that much higher than the fares used to calculate driver pay.

Upfront pricing is not the only scam. The manipulation and suppression of the surge is quickly becoming one of their main tricks. Manipulation, create surges to move ants to a desired area, once that zone is covered with enough drivers the surge disappear or is lowered, only for the drivers. Fake surges, drivers can see the surge in the map, 3.5x, 2.0x can feel it, wait 20+ minutes. Surge? Not really! Is an optical illusion, a fugazi.

Obviously, they still charge passengers based on the high surge pricing while drivers get a lower one or simply base fare. Nationwide oversaturation of drivers is laying the groundwork to completely get rid of the surge. Uber's marketing department is at full force with their 'Get your side hustle on!' ad campaign on Internet, radio and TV. They clearly have a plan and is not good for workers.

As a driver I'm pretty sure that you've seen how on some rides Uber take is negative. That is the result of subsidize trips, miscellaneous promotions and deals like Uber for Business where companies are provided with affordable rides for their employees.

Nothing wrong with growing and expanding their business operations but why it has to be at the expense of cutting drivers wages? It's just shameful the amount of dirty games these companies play to exploit, deceive and manipulate drivers like puppets. They can turn this industry into a very profitable business for everybody involved if they want to, but greed is a hell of a drug.

Ironically, drivers, the foundation and soul of this industry are the ones at the bottom receiving the worst treatment. Why? Simply because there's no regulation and companies can do pretty much whatever they want in the race to turn a profit.

Hamish Douglass, cofounder of the Magellan Financial Group, which manages more than $37 billion, said in May that capital-raising ponzi scheme Uber has a less than 1% chance of surviving the next decade. I couldn't agree more. I think it's easy to make these predictions when all a company does is to lose billions every year maintaining its operations by robbing Peter to pay Paul. Uber would've made Charles Ponzi proud.

The rideshare industry still has an ace up their sleeves, its ultimate dream: Self Driving Cars. Running their business investing only in self driving technology and vehicles to keep all the profits? They are all for it. That's their only hope to survive.

View attachment 157584
We are more focused on Uber mainly because of their role as the clear leader of the industry but Lyft is guilty of the same crimes. In fact, their unethical and questionable tactics are even worse than Uber in my honest opinion. Starting with their shady app. The difference with Lyft is that they have been pretty successful developing an effective facade of looking like the nicer and fairer deal. They mastered the art of deception and are making billions with it. Same game, different players. What about drivers? What are they doing as a collective to fight for better rates and working conditions? Except for Seattle drivers, not too much.

I drive part time in the Boston market. I just don't understand why a group of veteran drivers in this city think it's ok to glorify driving 80+ hours a week for a living and call that a success. It isn't as much as they wanna tell themselves otherwise. In the United States of America driving 70-80+ hours a week for a living is NOT even close to be considered a success. Period!

These drivers may find their screenshots to be high but the toll on their mental and physical health due to a lot of hours at the wheel is even higher. Pool-lines, $0.96 per mile, no benefits, taxes, all maintenance and expenses on the driver, depreciation of their vehicles, laughable incentives, etc., etc.. What a sweet deal rideshare companies have. There is a reason why Seattle drivers want to unionize. These companies are getting away with murder.

I am always amazed by the "business owner" mentality type of drivers and their bogus arguments: "You guys are just lazy, you have to work hard, jealous haters learn the value of the dollar, no participation trophies for you, move to Venezuela, yada yada yada. The amount of Kool-aid in their water is hilarious!

There's nothing to envy, believe me. Nobody is impressed by your $1500+ 80-90+ hours weekly earnings. How about you stop misleading newbies and lurkers with your no evidence posts or screenshots without the amount of hours worked? How about telling the truth about this industry, helping others with reality not deceiving them. Apparently, it's better to just post juicy screenshots and crop the amount of hours worked just to feed the egos. One thing is to work hard, another thing is to get exploited and worse to brag about it. Yes, compared with the high cost of living especially in Greater Boston, rideshare rates are sweatshop level. Facts.

People want to make money to support themselves and their families but they also want to enjoy their lives, otherwise what's the purpose of working? Saving, investing, and traveling, how is a full time driver going to do all these things relying on below minimum wage baby rates?

I don't know about the rest of the country but in Boston a full time driver needs to basically live in his/her car and have little to no social-family life in order to turn a decent profit. Most trips in the city are 4 miles or less, $8.00 on average for Uber X. What about airport rides? There are literally four miles from Logan airport to Downtown Boston, five to Cambridge, where a good chunk of the rides end up.

Sure, you can activate destination preferences in order to get a long trip but how many drivers are willing to wait up to two hours for a ping when there are 130+ drivers at the airport queue?

On the other hand, the risks of sitting in your car for long periods of time are many. Driving is the new smoking, a silent killer taking away so many lives every year slowly and without noise. If you as a full time driver are not eating healthy and exercising on a daily basis chances are that you are going to spend a good chunk of your earnings on healthcare. How many full time drivers after working 12+ hours a day are going to exercise? Crickets!

Yes, what are you going to do if you get diagnosed with a serious illness and can't work as a result, hence unable to pay for your health insurance? Use your wife or parents coverage? Claim a disability in order to collect a SE tax Social Security check? You better have plenty of savings because if that happens you are on your own.

View attachment 157590

In a gig historically led by immigrants, retirees, the uneducated, hippies and vagabonds we are very well aware about the general perception of society when it comes to the average cab driver let alone a rideshare driver a service 40% cheaper than traditional cabbies.

Drivers need to wake up and fight for their rights. $1.90 per mile, higher base fare, better working conditions and benefits. A Rideshare Revolution is what we need. This Independent Contractor BS is nothing but a convenient and powerful tool used by ridesharing companies to take advantage of an unregulated industry. Simple as that.

Driving crazy hours and feeling and treating ridesharing like a business is not going to change the fact that it is still a low wage, low skill, low rank, underappreciated gig and they are cooking you like a steak in a grill. How many of you would want your wife, girlfriend, mother, daughter or siblings doing rideshare full time? Saturday night, full of drunks anybody?


View attachment 157580

As drivers what can we do to help the cause?

You can start by contacting your local state Public Utility Commission President and politely ask what steps are being taken to ensure drivers are paid a fare wage for a hazardous taxing job?

Massachusetts PUC President
Angela O'Connor
Tel: (617) 305-3500
Fax: (617) 345-9102
[email protected]

California CPUC President
Michael Picker
415-703-2444
http://www.cpuc.ca.gov/picker/


Cool story.
 

somedriverguy

Well-Known Member
There needs to be a happy medium. I don't expect full employee status for my "work as much or as little as you want" job. But it would be nice if they would stop shitting on us by cutting the rates every time we blink.

When I bought my car, I knew I needed a mini van. I was gonna get one no matter what. But I was faced with a secondary consideration, get a used van for 20k and only use it for 18-24 months on UBER, or get a new one at 36k and use it for 72 months. Three times or more the utility for less than twice the price? No brainer when those are the facts.

Fast forward 6 months, UBER decides to cut rates 25% and open the platform to vehicles as old as 2001. "Hey, thanks for making us look good with that new car! Now go @@@@ yourself while we feed your entrails to theses mindless idiots who will be taking your job."

A large part of UBER's valuation is based on how many rides they serve and how much in fares they receive. And then those numbers are compared to known standards. If they were a cab company doing that many rides for that much in fares they would be worth 70 billion. But a cab company owns cars. A cab company owns mantanence bays, a cab company own warehouses to store the cars and maintanence bays. The only thing UBER owns is the dispatch system. Most of their valuation is the value of my car, my maintance of that car, and the fact that I have someplace to park it.

But I have worked in places where the petty dick who is your supervisor gets bonuses for how many employees he gets disciplined. He can't do your job, he doesn't understand your job, he just knows if he can find an excuse to write you up he gets paid more. And that environment is the norm these days.

So yeah, I like driving and being my own boss.
 

LA Dispatcher

Well-Known Member
Rideshare companies are abusing a deregulated industry in order to compete with each other and exploit drivers with very low rates. That is no longer a secret in the business world. Everybody knows it. Uber and Lyft are at war for the big pie of ride sharing. Both companies keep losing exorbitant amounts of money every year. $600 million for Lyft, $2.8 billion for Uber in 2016 alone. Who can offer the lowest fares to customers? How many trips can they subsidize? Competition is ferocious.

But competitiveness is not transparent, is not honest, not at all. The FBI is currently investigating Uber over a defunct program called 'Hell' that allegedly was used to interfere illegally with Lyft. The rideshare war is for real. The trend of the war has been lowering rates and subsidizing trips mostly on pools-lines (so ridiculously cheap) losing billions of dollars in the process all in the name of this unscrupulous competition. They take that route over raising fares and paying drivers better. Upfront pricing which is nothing more than charging riders whatever they feel like it while paying drivers based on miles and minutes turned out to be a gold mine. Why is such abusive practice even legal is beyond me.

View attachment 157583

RideShareGuy founder Harry Campbell worked with Data & Society researcher Alex Rosenblat to analyze five weeks of earnings from an Uber driver in New York who agreed to share his data. Over 165 trips from early March to early April, Uber overcharged this driver’s passengers by a total of $85.54. Clearly the total upfront fares paid by riders were that much higher than the fares used to calculate driver pay.

Upfront pricing is not the only scam. The manipulation and suppression of the surge is quickly becoming one of their main tricks. Manipulation, create surges to move ants to a desired area, once that zone is covered with enough drivers the surge disappear or is lowered, only for the drivers. Fake surges, drivers can see the surge in the map, 3.5x, 2.0x can feel it, wait 20+ minutes. Surge? Not really! Is an optical illusion, a fugazi.

Obviously, they still charge passengers based on the high surge pricing while drivers get a lower one or simply base fare. Nationwide oversaturation of drivers is laying the groundwork to completely get rid of the surge. Uber's marketing department is at full force with their 'Get your side hustle on!' ad campaign on Internet, radio and TV. They clearly have a plan and is not good for workers.

As a driver I'm pretty sure that you've seen how on some rides Uber take is negative. That is the result of subsidize trips, miscellaneous promotions and deals like Uber for Business where companies are provided with affordable rides for their employees.

Nothing wrong with growing and expanding their business operations but why it has to be at the expense of cutting drivers wages? It's just shameful the amount of dirty games these companies play to exploit, deceive and manipulate drivers like puppets. They can turn this industry into a very profitable business for everybody involved if they want to, but greed is a hell of a drug.

Ironically, drivers, the foundation and soul of this industry are the ones at the bottom receiving the worst treatment. Why? Simply because there's no regulation and companies can do pretty much whatever they want in the race to turn a profit.

Hamish Douglass, cofounder of the Magellan Financial Group, which manages more than $37 billion, said in May that capital-raising ponzi scheme Uber has a less than 1% chance of surviving the next decade. I couldn't agree more. I think it's easy to make these predictions when all a company does is to lose billions every year maintaining its operations by robbing Peter to pay Paul. Uber would've made Charles Ponzi proud.

The rideshare industry still has an ace up their sleeves, its ultimate dream: Self Driving Cars. Running their business investing only in self driving technology and vehicles to keep all the profits? They are all for it. That's their only hope to survive.

View attachment 157584
We are more focused on Uber mainly because of their role as the clear leader of the industry but Lyft is guilty of the same crimes. In fact, their unethical and questionable tactics are even worse than Uber in my honest opinion. Starting with their shady app. The difference with Lyft is that they have been pretty successful developing an effective facade of looking like the nicer and fairer deal. They mastered the art of deception and are making billions with it. Same game, different players. What about drivers? What are they doing as a collective to fight for better rates and working conditions? Except for Seattle drivers, not too much.

I drive part time in the Boston market. I just don't understand why a group of veteran drivers in this city think it's ok to glorify driving 80+ hours a week for a living and call that a success. It isn't as much as they wanna tell themselves otherwise. In the United States of America driving 70-80+ hours a week for a living is NOT even close to be considered a success. Period!

These drivers may find their screenshots to be high but the toll on their mental and physical health due to a lot of hours at the wheel is even higher. Pool-lines, $0.96 per mile, no benefits, taxes, all maintenance and expenses on the driver, depreciation of their vehicles, laughable incentives, etc., etc.. What a sweet deal rideshare companies have. There is a reason why Seattle drivers want to unionize. These companies are getting away with murder.

I am always amazed by the "business owner" mentality type of drivers and their bogus arguments: "You guys are just lazy, you have to work hard, jealous haters learn the value of the dollar, no participation trophies for you, move to Venezuela, yada yada yada. The amount of Kool-aid in their water is hilarious!

There's nothing to envy, believe me. Nobody is impressed by your $1500+ 80-90+ hours weekly earnings. How about you stop misleading newbies and lurkers with your no evidence posts or screenshots without the amount of hours worked? How about telling the truth about this industry, helping others with reality not deceiving them. Apparently, it's better to just post juicy screenshots and crop the amount of hours worked just to feed the egos. One thing is to work hard, another thing is to get exploited and worse to brag about it. Yes, compared with the high cost of living especially in Greater Boston, rideshare rates are sweatshop level. Facts.

People want to make money to support themselves and their families but they also want to enjoy their lives, otherwise what's the purpose of working? Saving, investing, and traveling, how is a full time driver going to do all these things relying on below minimum wage baby rates?

I don't know about the rest of the country but in Boston a full time driver needs to basically live in his/her car and have little to no social-family life in order to turn a decent profit. Most trips in the city are 4 miles or less, $8.00 on average for Uber X. What about airport rides? There are literally four miles from Logan airport to Downtown Boston, five to Cambridge, where a good chunk of the rides end up.

Sure, you can activate destination preferences in order to get a long trip but how many drivers are willing to wait up to two hours for a ping when there are 130+ drivers at the airport queue?

On the other hand, the risks of sitting in your car for long periods of time are many. Driving is the new smoking, a silent killer taking away so many lives every year slowly and without noise. If you as a full time driver are not eating healthy and exercising on a daily basis chances are that you are going to spend a good chunk of your earnings on healthcare. How many full time drivers after working 12+ hours a day are going to exercise? Crickets!

Yes, what are you going to do if you get diagnosed with a serious illness and can't work as a result, hence unable to pay for your health insurance? Use your wife or parents coverage? Claim a disability in order to collect a SE tax Social Security check? You better have plenty of savings because if that happens you are on your own.

View attachment 157590

In a gig historically led by immigrants, retirees, the uneducated, hippies and vagabonds we are very well aware about the general perception of society when it comes to the average cab driver let alone a rideshare driver a service 40% cheaper than traditional cabbies.

Drivers need to wake up and fight for their rights. $1.90 per mile, higher base fare, better working conditions and benefits. A Rideshare Revolution is what we need. This Independent Contractor BS is nothing but a convenient and powerful tool used by ridesharing companies to take advantage of an unregulated industry. Simple as that.

Driving crazy hours and feeling and treating ridesharing like a business is not going to change the fact that it is still a low wage, low skill, low rank, underappreciated gig and they are cooking you like a steak in a grill. How many of you would want your wife, girlfriend, mother, daughter or siblings doing rideshare full time? Saturday night, full of drunks anybody?


View attachment 157580

As drivers what can we do to help the cause?

You can start by contacting your local state Public Utility Commission President and politely ask what steps are being taken to ensure drivers are paid a fare wage for a hazardous taxing job?

Massachusetts PUC President
Angela O'Connor
Tel: (617) 305-3500
Fax: (617) 345-9102
[email protected]

California CPUC President
Michael Picker
415-703-2444
http://www.cpuc.ca.gov/picker/

More union propaganda. What is your idea of a "fair wage"?
 

tunaskeet

Active Member
Rideshare companies are abusing a deregulated industry in order to compete with each other and exploit drivers with very low rates. That is no longer a secret in the business world. Everybody knows it. Uber and Lyft are at war for the big pie of ride sharing. Both companies keep losing exorbitant amounts of money every year. $600 million for Lyft, $2.8 billion for Uber in 2016 alone. Who can offer the lowest fares to customers? How many trips can they subsidize? Competition is ferocious.

But competitiveness is not transparent, is not honest, not at all. The FBI is currently investigating Uber over a defunct program called 'Hell' that allegedly was used to interfere illegally with Lyft. The rideshare war is for real. The trend of the war has been lowering rates and subsidizing trips mostly on pools-lines (so ridiculously cheap) losing billions of dollars in the process all in the name of this unscrupulous competition. They take that route over raising fares and paying drivers better. Upfront pricing which is nothing more than charging riders whatever they feel like it while paying drivers based on miles and minutes turned out to be a gold mine. Why is such abusive practice even legal is beyond me.

View attachment 157583

RideShareGuy founder Harry Campbell worked with Data & Society researcher Alex Rosenblat to analyze five weeks of earnings from an Uber driver in New York who agreed to share his data. Over 165 trips from early March to early April, Uber overcharged this driver’s passengers by a total of $85.54. Clearly the total upfront fares paid by riders were that much higher than the fares used to calculate driver pay.

Upfront pricing is not the only scam. The manipulation and suppression of the surge is quickly becoming one of their main tricks. Manipulation, create surges to move ants to a desired area, once that zone is covered with enough drivers the surge disappear or is lowered, only for the drivers. Fake surges, drivers can see the surge in the map, 3.5x, 2.0x can feel it, wait 20+ minutes. Surge? Not really! Is an optical illusion, a fugazi.

Obviously, they still charge passengers based on the high surge pricing while drivers get a lower one or simply base fare. Nationwide oversaturation of drivers is laying the groundwork to completely get rid of the surge. Uber's marketing department is at full force with their 'Get your side hustle on!' ad campaign on Internet, radio and TV. They clearly have a plan and is not good for workers.

As a driver I'm pretty sure that you've seen how on some rides Uber take is negative. That is the result of subsidize trips, miscellaneous promotions and deals like Uber for Business where companies are provided with affordable rides for their employees.

Nothing wrong with growing and expanding their business operations but why it has to be at the expense of cutting drivers wages? It's just shameful the amount of dirty games these companies play to exploit, deceive and manipulate drivers like puppets. They can turn this industry into a very profitable business for everybody involved if they want to, but greed is a hell of a drug.

Ironically, drivers, the foundation and soul of this industry are the ones at the bottom receiving the worst treatment. Why? Simply because there's no regulation and companies can do pretty much whatever they want in the race to turn a profit.

Hamish Douglass, cofounder of the Magellan Financial Group, which manages more than $37 billion, said in May that capital-raising ponzi scheme Uber has a less than 1% chance of surviving the next decade. I couldn't agree more. I think it's easy to make these predictions when all a company does is to lose billions every year maintaining its operations by robbing Peter to pay Paul. Uber would've made Charles Ponzi proud.

The rideshare industry still has an ace up their sleeves, its ultimate dream: Self Driving Cars. Running their business investing only in self driving technology and vehicles to keep all the profits? They are all for it. That's their only hope to survive.

View attachment 157584
We are more focused on Uber mainly because of their role as the clear leader of the industry but Lyft is guilty of the same crimes. In fact, their unethical and questionable tactics are even worse than Uber in my honest opinion. Starting with their shady app. The difference with Lyft is that they have been pretty successful developing an effective facade of looking like the nicer and fairer deal. They mastered the art of deception and are making billions with it. Same game, different players. What about drivers? What are they doing as a collective to fight for better rates and working conditions? Except for Seattle drivers, not too much.

I drive part time in the Boston market. I just don't understand why a group of veteran drivers in this city think it's ok to glorify driving 80+ hours a week for a living and call that a success. It isn't as much as they wanna tell themselves otherwise. In the United States of America driving 70-80+ hours a week for a living is NOT even close to be considered a success. Period!

These drivers may find their screenshots to be high but the toll on their mental and physical health due to a lot of hours at the wheel is even higher. Pool-lines, $0.96 per mile, no benefits, taxes, all maintenance and expenses on the driver, depreciation of their vehicles, laughable incentives, etc., etc.. What a sweet deal rideshare companies have. There is a reason why Seattle drivers want to unionize. These companies are getting away with murder.

I am always amazed by the "business owner" mentality type of drivers and their bogus arguments: "You guys are just lazy, you have to work hard, jealous haters learn the value of the dollar, no participation trophies for you, move to Venezuela, yada yada yada. The amount of Kool-aid in their water is hilarious!

There's nothing to envy, believe me. Nobody is impressed by your $1500+ 80-90+ hours weekly earnings. How about you stop misleading newbies and lurkers with your no evidence posts or screenshots without the amount of hours worked? How about telling the truth about this industry, helping others with reality not deceiving them. Apparently, it's better to just post juicy screenshots and crop the amount of hours worked just to feed the egos. One thing is to work hard, another thing is to get exploited and worse to brag about it. Yes, compared with the high cost of living especially in Greater Boston, rideshare rates are sweatshop level. Facts.

People want to make money to support themselves and their families but they also want to enjoy their lives, otherwise what's the purpose of working? Saving, investing, and traveling, how is a full time driver going to do all these things relying on below minimum wage baby rates?

I don't know about the rest of the country but in Boston a full time driver needs to basically live in his/her car and have little to no social-family life in order to turn a decent profit. Most trips in the city are 4 miles or less, $8.00 on average for Uber X. What about airport rides? There are literally four miles from Logan airport to Downtown Boston, five to Cambridge, where a good chunk of the rides end up.

Sure, you can activate destination preferences in order to get a long trip but how many drivers are willing to wait up to two hours for a ping when there are 130+ drivers at the airport queue?

On the other hand, the risks of sitting in your car for long periods of time are many. Driving is the new smoking, a silent killer taking away so many lives every year slowly and without noise. If you as a full time driver are not eating healthy and exercising on a daily basis chances are that you are going to spend a good chunk of your earnings on healthcare. How many full time drivers after working 12+ hours a day are going to exercise? Crickets!

Yes, what are you going to do if you get diagnosed with a serious illness and can't work as a result, hence unable to pay for your health insurance? Use your wife or parents coverage? Claim a disability in order to collect a SE tax Social Security check? You better have plenty of savings because if that happens you are on your own.

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In a gig historically led by immigrants, retirees, the uneducated, hippies and vagabonds we are very well aware about the general perception of society when it comes to the average cab driver let alone a rideshare driver a service 40% cheaper than traditional cabbies.

Drivers need to wake up and fight for their rights. $1.90 per mile, higher base fare, better working conditions and benefits. A Rideshare Revolution is what we need. This Independent Contractor BS is nothing but a convenient and powerful tool used by ridesharing companies to take advantage of an unregulated industry. Simple as that.

Driving crazy hours and feeling and treating ridesharing like a business is not going to change the fact that it is still a low wage, low skill, low rank, underappreciated gig and they are cooking you like a steak in a grill. How many of you would want your wife, girlfriend, mother, daughter or siblings doing rideshare full time? Saturday night, full of drunks anybody?


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As drivers what can we do to help the cause?

You can start by contacting your local state Public Utility Commission President and politely ask what steps are being taken to ensure drivers are paid a fare wage for a hazardous taxing job?

Massachusetts PUC President
Angela O'Connor
Tel: (617) 305-3500
Fax: (617) 345-9102
[email protected]

California CPUC President
Michael Picker
415-703-2444
http://www.cpuc.ca.gov/picker/
Amen , but ya good coke ,lol
 
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