Tesla unveils ‘Robotaxi’ plan for self-driving ride-sharing network next year

QLDUberDriver

Well-Known Member
Time is ticking faster for those people who heckled the idea as "not in my lifetime". Drivers can be thankful of how the Australian govt has been going with any advancement in tech, so will buy a couple years once the rest of the world has evolved into the future. As per most other manufacturers, they are all getting ready for the self driving electric change. Machine learning and computing power has advanced considerably in the last 12mths.

Each time I come in here, people are still talking like they are going to have company picnics in 5 years doing this gig.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

https://electrek.co/2019/04/22/tesl...iPBqYQdOmlfsuBKQq-tkRJBUi01kVq5mnLpTGxT8QcEIg


Tesla unveils ‘Robotaxi’ plan for self-driving ride-sharing network next year
As part of Tesla’s presentations about their progress toward full self-driving, the automaker unveiled its ‘Robotaxi’ plan for a self-driving ride-sharing network with its electric cars to be activated as soon as next year with an over-the-air software update.
Today, Tesla is holding an ‘Autonomy Day’ for investors during which it has made several presentations about its effort to bring to market a full self-driving system.
We posted an article on Pete Bannon’s presentation about Tesla’s new Full Self-Driving computer. which CEO Elon Musk claims is ‘objectively the best chip in the world’.
You can visit our Tesla Autonomy Event news hub for all coverage of the series of presentations and announcements made by the automaker at the event today.
Musk’s own presentation focused on Tesla’s timeline to bring a full self-driving to market and the ‘Tesla Network’, the company’s plan for a shared fleet of Robotaxi vehicles.
The CEO believes that Tesla will have developed the software for all the features required to achieve a full self-driving system by the end of the year.
He emphasized that this version system will still require driver attention, which doesn’t really make it self-driving, but he expects that it will stop requiring driver attention by Q2 2020.
From there, Tesla will be working with regulators to have the system approved as a self-driving system that doesn’t require driver supervision.
The timeline for that will depend on the regulators in different jurisdictions, but Musk said that he is confident it will happen in at least one market by the end of next year.

Once that happens, Tesla plans to enable its Robotaxi network with an update to its existing mobile app.
On the app, Tesla owners will be able to add their cars to the shared fleet to earn money or summon an autonomous Tesla vehicle to pick them up and bring them to a destination:

When the cars are fully autonomous, he estimates that they have a value of ~$200,000 when part of the self-driving network.
Considering Tesla is selling those cars starting at less than $50,000, Musk claimed that consumers should think hard about self-driving when buying any other car than a Tesla since they are the only company offering a vehicle, which they claim will eventually be full self-driving.
He said:
“It is financially insane to buy anything else than a Tesla.”
Musk argues that a Model 3 used as a robotaxi could generate about $30,000 in gross profit per year:

Musk expects the economics to improve over time as Tesla deploys more efficient vehicles and reduces the cost of operation per mile.

Electrek’s Take
That’s the holy grail of mobility: a shared-fleet of all-electric self-driving vehicles.
But that’s the easy part of the equation.
Delivering a fully self-driving system capable to drive safer than a human in any condition is obviously the most difficult part and Tesla did a pretty convincing job in trying to explain how they will deliver such a system over the next year in the other presentations throughout the day.
I am still on the “I’ll believe it when I see it” side, but I have to say that I feel a lot better about having bought the Full Self-Driving package on my Tesla after watching today’s presentations.





https://electrek.co/2019/04/22/tesl...iPBqYQdOmlfsuBKQq-tkRJBUi01kVq5mnLpTGxT8QcEIg
 

Pen

Well-Known Member
Today, one of Teslas cars went up in smoke while parked. Luckily no pax were inside!
 

QLDUberDriver

Well-Known Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #3
Today, one of Teslas cars went up in smoke while parked. Luckily no pax were inside!
It was 2 days ago actually. It would be very strange for pax to be in an underground car park lol. It will be interesting to see what the investigation will reveal if it was sabotage or issue with that battery pack. \

Not good news for evs but if they compared deaths and issues side by side with combustion engine vehicles, it would be drastic negative against the latter. Im sure when the car was replacing horse and carriage there was all sort of similar fears. Millions of deaths later didn't seem to effect sales. :roflmao:

https://www.cnet.com/roadshow/news/tesla-model-s-china-fire-video/
 

Pen

Well-Known Member
It was 2 days ago actually. It would be very strange for pax to be in an underground car park lol. It will be interesting to see what the investigation will reveal if it was sabotage or issue with that battery pack. \

Not good news for evs but if they compared deaths and issues side by side with combustion engine vehicles, it would be drastic negative against the latter. Im sure when the car was replacing horse and carriage there was all sort of similar fears. Millions of deaths later didn't seem to effect sales. :roflmao:

https://www.cnet.com/roadshow/news/tesla-model-s-china-fire-video/
No fear here, I drive a hybrid. The point is it may have been stopped at lights or mobile when it caught fire. Also, you can't compare deaths with internal combustion engines as there are billions more of them. The thing is, the driverless car is far from perfect.
 

Who is John Galt?

Well-Known Member
Time is ticking faster for those people who heckled the idea as "not in my lifetime".

Tesla unveils ‘Robotaxi’ plan for self-driving ride-sharing network next year

He emphasized that this version system will still require driver attention, which doesn’t really make it self-driving, but he expects that it will stop requiring driver attention by Q2 2020.

Elon Musk predicts a lot of things. Some of them may eventually come to pass.

However, the guy has now developed the sad reputation of someone who believes his own rhetoric.

He is becoming the global owner, not of the manufacture of 'revolutionary' cars but rather, fake news.

.
 

QLDUberDriver

Well-Known Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #7
No fear here, I drive a hybrid. The point is it may have been stopped at lights or mobile when it caught fire. Also, you can't compare deaths with internal combustion engines as there are billions more of them. The thing is, the driverless car is far from perfect.
The video in the last link shows it was stationary, in under ground parking. Are you talking about another incident? Post the link if its different news. Also that Tesla was parked and had nothing to do with driver less safety. Not sure then why you highlighted an incident on a vehicle comparably lower in numbers to combustion engine vehicles referencing pax safety. Incidentally Hyundai and Kia in the U.S. are recalling over 500,000 cars due to new problems that can cause engine fires. Cars don't get recalled unless some incidents happen in the first place. Hopefully no pax where injured. This can be googled and you will find February 28th, 2019 as latest related news.

The thing is, the Tesla ride share news was about what was coming out and not related to other driver less software or hardware currently available. Keep an eye out for 2nd half of 2020 but fear not of you gig, this wont be taking the drunk slob falling out of the local RSL looking for their $5 trip to get cigs. Below is an article which should confirm your comment about making comparisons about each technology.

But from someone who has been deep in working in coding and tech the last 5 years, I would encourage anyone who can read, to start learning skills that will better pay bills. Not hard to do courses online these day even while doing side gigs. Tesla isnt the only one pushing forward with market changes. Just compare you mobile phone 10 years ago.

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https://www.recode.net/2018/5/17/17362308/elon-musk-tesla-self-driving-autopilot-fatalities

Elon Musk says Tesla crashes shouldn’t be front-page news because there are more human-driven fatalities. That’s not an accurate comparison.

Breaking down the stats that Elon Musk and his self-driving-car cohorts use to say their vehicles are safer.

Proponents of self-driving-car technology often tout one statistic: More than 37,000 people died in automotive-related accidents every year for at least the past two years.

Self-driving cars would help reduce those accidents, these people say.

The logic is simple. The highest number of auto-related deaths are due to drunk driving, speeding and not wearing a seat belt. This can ostensibly be solved by taking the human out of the front seat of the car.

But a high level of human-driving-related deaths doesn’t mean that the current versions of semi-autonomous technology are safer.

In fact, some industry experts say it’s actually less safe to introduce technology that only takes over some of the driving task, since it relies on two imperfect systems: Technology that is inherently limited in its capabilities, and humans.

Still, some continue to highlight the safety of semi-autonomous tech on the road today by citing that statistic. Earlier this week, Tesla CEO Elon Musk chided the Washington Post for writing about a Tesla crash in which the driver involved said Autopilot — the company’s driver-assist technology — was engaged.

“It’s super messed up that a Tesla crash resulting in a broken ankle is front page news and the ~40,000 people who died in U.S. auto accidents alone in past year get almost no coverage,” Musk tweeted.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration is now investigating that crash, as Reuters first reported. This will be the third Autopilot-related crash NHTSA is investigating this year alone.

Before dissecting the numbers, it’s important to address Musk’s larger point, which is that the media unfairly covers Tesla crashes more than human-driven crashes. By Musk’s own admission, Tesla’s driver-assist technology is still unproven and is being tested — on real humans — so it’s important to track its progress. One way to do that is to tally accidents and fatalities.

That’s especially vital since Musk has said on multiple occasions that Teslas are almost “4x better” than average cars, with only one fatality per 320 million miles in cars equipped with Autopilot. Some question these company-provided statistics. It’s also unclear if all those miles were driven in Autopilot mode or just account for those driven in cars that come equipped with the driver-assist technology.

(We may know more next quarter, which is when Musk said he will start to publish safety reports.)

By comparison, those approximately 40,000 vehicle deaths in a year happened across the 3.2 trillion vehicle miles that people travelled on public roads in 2016, the most recent year for which a full set of data is available. That’s about one death per 80 million miles driven.

But we can’t compare it apples to apples. It stands to reason that manually driven vehicles operated on all types of roads — not just on highways, like Autopilot — that have been driven millions of miles more than Teslas have a higher likelihood of getting into accidents.

On top of that, the fatality rate that NHTSA puts out every year includes driver deaths, pedestrian deaths, motorcycle deaths and bicycle deaths. Tesla’s just includes known driver and pedestrian fatalities.

As of November 2016, Tesla’s fleet of vehicles on the road had driven 1.3 billion miles using Autopilot. While we don’t have updated numbers yet, Musk said on the company’s most recent earnings call that that number is steadily increasing and makes up one-third of all highway driving in Tesla vehicles.

The company also claims that NHTSA said that Autopilot resulted in 40 percent fewer crashes than Tesla cars that didn’t have the technology.

But even these numbers can be misleading. The agency itself said that it did not test the safety of Autopilot during a 2016 investigation. It just compared the crash rates of cars that had Autopilot installed to those that didn’t; it did not assess whether Autopilot was engaged during those miles driven.

Right now there is no definitive means of quantifying how safe autonomous technology truly is, or how much safer than a human driver a robot driver needs to be for it to be ready to hit public roads. One study conducted at the University of Michigan says that in order to be 80 percent confident that self-driving tech is 90 percent safer than human-driven cars, test vehicles need to be driven 11 billion miles.

No autonomous vehicle company has yet to drive that in the real world or in simulation.
Post automatically merged:

Elon Musk predicts a lot of things. Some of them may eventually come to pass.

However, the guy has now developed the sad reputation of someone who believes his own rhetoric.

He is becoming the global owner, not of the manufacture of 'revolutionary' cars but rather, fake news.

.
Might be to do with the theory of failing fast to get to market. The good news, that it started other manufacturers to develop more into this transport evolution. The ride share plan might not be Tesla but another will work it out. And Im sure you believe also Uber would love to remove drivers from the profit margins as soon the tech is ready.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Pen

Golfer

Well-Known Member
No fear here, I drive a hybrid. The point is it may have been stopped at lights or mobile when it caught fire. Also, you can't compare deaths with internal combustion engines as there are billions more of them. The thing is, the driverless car is far from perfect.
Yeh saw that in SBS News, there were 4 of them parked , captured on, security camera, so sabotage ,not likely ,
One just started" smoking " then " whoosh ," :eek::rolleyes: more likely electrical fire, be interesting to hear what actualy the cause was
 

QLDUberDriver

Well-Known Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #11
Yeh saw that in SBS News, there were 4 of them parked , captured on, security camera, so sabotage ,not likely ,
One just started" smoking " then " whoosh ," :eek::rolleyes: more likely electrical fire, be interesting to hear what actualy the cause was
Did you mean 4 cars parked? Because there was only one Tesla in the video. If SBS says 4 Teslas, I would expect that sort of accuracy from Fairfax Media :roflmao:. One thing I can say for certain, a Tesla is too expensive for my pocket lol.


I can only imagine how an intense of a fire that could have been down there. It would definitely benefit some companies to sabotage, but my guess would be either damage or a fault. Will only know if they ever release the findings.
 

Golfer

Well-Known Member
Did you mean 4 cars parked? Because there was only one Tesla in the video. If SBS says 4 Teslas, I would expect that sort of accuracy from Fairfax Media :roflmao:. One thing I can say for certain, a Tesla is too expensive for my pocket lol.


I can only imagine how an intense of a fire that could have been down there. It would definitely benefit some companies to sabotage, but my guess would be either damage or a fault. Will only know if they ever release the findings.
Yep that's the news flash I saw on SBS NEWS , naturally it was quick , didn't have time , to notice an Audi was beside it all to quick
They didn't mention the make of the other cars , just the one there as being a Tesla
 
Last edited:

ST DYMPHNA son

Well-Known Member
The video in the last link shows it was stationary, in under ground parking. Are you talking about another incident? Post the link if its different news. Also that Tesla was parked and had nothing to do with driver less safety. Not sure then why you highlighted an incident on a vehicle comparably lower in numbers to combustion engine vehicles referencing pax safety. Incidentally Hyundai and Kia in the U.S. are recalling over 500,000 cars due to new problems that can cause engine fires. Cars don't get recalled unless some

Elon Musk says Tesla crashes shouldn’t be front-page news because there are more human-driven fatalities. That’s not an accurate comparison.

Breaking down the stats that Elon Musk and his self-driving-car cohorts use to say their vehicles are safer.

Proponents of self-driving-car technology often tout one statistic: More than 37,000 people died in automotive-related accidents every year for at least the past two years.

Self-driving cars would help reduce those accidents, these people say.

The logic is simple. The highest number of auto-related deaths are due to drunk driving, speeding and not wearing a seat belt. This can ostensibly be solved by taking the human out of the front seat of the car.

But a high level of human-driving-related deaths doesn’t mean that the current versions of semi-autonomous technology are safer.

In fact, some industry experts say it’s actually less safe to introduce technology that only takes over some of the driving task, since it relies on two imperfect systems: Technology that is inherently limited in its capabilities, and humans.

Still, some continue to highlight the safety of semi-autonomous tech on the road today by citing that statistic. Earlier this week, Tesla CEO Elon Musk chided the Washington Post for writing about a Tesla crash in which the driver involved said Autopilot — the company’s driver-assist technology — was engaged.

“It’s super messed up that a Tesla crash resulting in a broken ankle is front page news and the ~40,000 people who died in U.S. auto accidents alone in past year get almost no coverage,” Musk tweeted.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration is now investigating that crash, as Reuters first reported. This will be the third Autopilot-related crash NHTSA is investigating this year alone.

Before dissecting the numbers, it’s important to address Musk’s larger point, which is that the media unfairly covers Tesla crashes more than human-driven crashes. By Musk’s own admission, Tesla’s driver-assist technology is still unproven and is being tested — on real humans — so it’s important to track its progress. One way to do that is to tally accidents and fatalities.

That’s especially vital since Musk has said on multiple occasions that Teslas are almost “4x better” than average cars, with only one fatality per 320 million miles in cars equipped with Autopilot. Some question these company-provided statistics. It’s also unclear if all those miles were driven in Autopilot mode or just account for those driven in cars that come equipped with the driver-assist technology.

(We may know more next quarter, which is when Musk said he will start to publish safety reports.)

By comparison, those approximately 40,000 vehicle deaths in a year happened across the 3.2 trillion vehicle miles that people travelled on public roads in 2016, the most recent year for which a full set of data is available. That’s about one death per 80 million miles driven.

But we can’t compare it apples to apples. It stands to reason that manually driven vehicles operated on all types of roads — not just on highways, like Autopilot — that have been driven millions of miles more than Teslas have a higher likelihood of getting into accidents.

On top of that, the fatality rate that NHTSA puts out every year includes driver deaths, pedestrian deaths, motorcycle deaths and bicycle deaths. Tesla’s just includes known driver and pedestrian fatalities.

As of November 2016, Tesla’s fleet of vehicles on the road had driven 1.3 billion miles using Autopilot. While we don’t have updated numbers yet, Musk said on the company’s most recent earnings call that that number is steadily increasing and makes up one-third of all highway driving in Tesla vehicles.

The company also claims that NHTSA said that Autopilot resulted in 40 percent fewer crashes than Tesla cars that didn’t have the technology.

But even these numbers can be misleading. The agency itself said that it did not test the safety of Autopilot during a 2016 investigation. It just compared the crash rates of cars that had Autopilot installed to those that didn’t; it did not assess whether Autopilot was engaged during those miles driven.

Right now there is no definitive means of quantifying how safe autonomous technology truly is, or how much safer than a human driver a robot driver needs to be for it to be ready to hit public roads. One study conducted at the University of Michigan says that in order to be 80 percent confident that self-driving tech is 90 percent safer than human-driven cars, test vehicles need to be driven 11 billion miles.

No autonomous vehicle company has yet to drive that in the real world or in simulation.
Post automatically merged:



Might be to do with the theory of failing fast to get to market. The good news, that it started other manufacturers to develop more into this transport evolution. The ride share plan might not be Tesla but another will work it out. And Im sure you believe also Uber would love to remove drivers from the profit margins as soon the tech is ready.
...hey guys...have a glass of warm milk...Elton Musk wants people to buy his cars to get on his system and pay him 30% for the privilege ...so if any one worry who will clean a chunder and everything else????...rest easy
kind of uber like business model but better....
 

QLDUberDriver

Well-Known Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #18
Oh, always the smarter than thou QLDUberDriver @@@@in prick
Not sure what you don't get about the spelling error joke that everyone else did.

holier-than-thou:
People who are holier-than-thou think that they are morally better than anyone else.
What part of any of my post claims to be morally better than anyone else? Facts are facts and jokes are jokes.

One fact you have proven right though, you're just @@@@in dumb.
 

1995flyingspur

Well-Known Member
The video in the last link shows it was stationary, in under ground parking. Are you talking about another incident? Post the link if its different news. Also that Tesla was parked and had nothing to do with driver less safety. Not sure then why you highlighted an incident on a vehicle comparably lower in numbers to combustion engine vehicles referencing pax safety. Incidentally Hyundai and Kia in the U.S. are recalling over 500,000 cars due to new problems that can cause engine fires. Cars don't get recalled unless some incidents happen in the first place. Hopefully no pax where injured. This can be googled and you will find February 28th, 2019 as latest related news.

The thing is, the Tesla ride share news was about what was coming out and not related to other driver less software or hardware currently available. Keep an eye out for 2nd half of 2020 but fear not of you gig, this wont be taking the drunk slob falling out of the local RSL looking for their $5 trip to get cigs. Below is an article which should confirm your comment about making comparisons about each technology.

But from someone who has been deep in working in coding and tech the last 5 years, I would encourage anyone who can read, to start learning skills that will better pay bills. Not hard to do courses online these day even while doing side gigs. Tesla isnt the only one pushing forward with market changes. Just compare you mobile phone 10 years ago.

------------
https://www.recode.net/2018/5/17/17362308/elon-musk-tesla-self-driving-autopilot-fatalities

Elon Musk says Tesla crashes shouldn’t be front-page news because there are more human-driven fatalities. That’s not an accurate comparison.

Breaking down the stats that Elon Musk and his self-driving-car cohorts use to say their vehicles are safer.

Proponents of self-driving-car technology often tout one statistic: More than 37,000 people died in automotive-related accidents every year for at least the past two years.

Self-driving cars would help reduce those accidents, these people say.

The logic is simple. The highest number of auto-related deaths are due to drunk driving, speeding and not wearing a seat belt. This can ostensibly be solved by taking the human out of the front seat of the car.

But a high level of human-driving-related deaths doesn’t mean that the current versions of semi-autonomous technology are safer.

In fact, some industry experts say it’s actually less safe to introduce technology that only takes over some of the driving task, since it relies on two imperfect systems: Technology that is inherently limited in its capabilities, and humans.

Still, some continue to highlight the safety of semi-autonomous tech on the road today by citing that statistic. Earlier this week, Tesla CEO Elon Musk chided the Washington Post for writing about a Tesla crash in which the driver involved said Autopilot — the company’s driver-assist technology — was engaged.

“It’s super messed up that a Tesla crash resulting in a broken ankle is front page news and the ~40,000 people who died in U.S. auto accidents alone in past year get almost no coverage,” Musk tweeted.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration is now investigating that crash, as Reuters first reported. This will be the third Autopilot-related crash NHTSA is investigating this year alone.

Before dissecting the numbers, it’s important to address Musk’s larger point, which is that the media unfairly covers Tesla crashes more than human-driven crashes. By Musk’s own admission, Tesla’s driver-assist technology is still unproven and is being tested — on real humans — so it’s important to track its progress. One way to do that is to tally accidents and fatalities.

That’s especially vital since Musk has said on multiple occasions that Teslas are almost “4x better” than average cars, with only one fatality per 320 million miles in cars equipped with Autopilot. Some question these company-provided statistics. It’s also unclear if all those miles were driven in Autopilot mode or just account for those driven in cars that come equipped with the driver-assist technology.

(We may know more next quarter, which is when Musk said he will start to publish safety reports.)

By comparison, those approximately 40,000 vehicle deaths in a year happened across the 3.2 trillion vehicle miles that people travelled on public roads in 2016, the most recent year for which a full set of data is available. That’s about one death per 80 million miles driven.

But we can’t compare it apples to apples. It stands to reason that manually driven vehicles operated on all types of roads — not just on highways, like Autopilot — that have been driven millions of miles more than Teslas have a higher likelihood of getting into accidents.

On top of that, the fatality rate that NHTSA puts out every year includes driver deaths, pedestrian deaths, motorcycle deaths and bicycle deaths. Tesla’s just includes known driver and pedestrian fatalities.

As of November 2016, Tesla’s fleet of vehicles on the road had driven 1.3 billion miles using Autopilot. While we don’t have updated numbers yet, Musk said on the company’s most recent earnings call that that number is steadily increasing and makes up one-third of all highway driving in Tesla vehicles.

The company also claims that NHTSA said that Autopilot resulted in 40 percent fewer crashes than Tesla cars that didn’t have the technology.

But even these numbers can be misleading. The agency itself said that it did not test the safety of Autopilot during a 2016 investigation. It just compared the crash rates of cars that had Autopilot installed to those that didn’t; it did not assess whether Autopilot was engaged during those miles driven.

Right now there is no definitive means of quantifying how safe autonomous technology truly is, or how much safer than a human driver a robot driver needs to be for it to be ready to hit public roads. One study conducted at the University of Michigan says that in order to be 80 percent confident that self-driving tech is 90 percent safer than human-driven cars, test vehicles need to be driven 11 billion miles.

No autonomous vehicle company has yet to drive that in the real world or in simulation.
Post automatically merged:



Might be to do with the theory of failing fast to get to market. The good news, that it started other manufacturers to develop more into this transport evolution. The ride share plan might not be Tesla but another will work it out. And Im sure you believe also Uber would love to remove drivers from the profit margins as soon the tech is ready.
This is all part of the same bubble. It will blow up, and it's gonna be bad!
 

UberX.illegal?

Well-Known Member
Not sure what you don't get about the spelling error joke that everyone else did.

holier-than-thou:
People who are holier-than-thou think that they are morally better than anyone else.
What part of any of my post claims to be morally better than anyone else? Facts are facts and jokes are jokes.

One fact you have proven right though, you're just @@@@in dumb.
WTF?!? You think I wrote "smarter than thou" rather than "holier than thou"?

Just THAT, Proves my point. You @@@@en dumb @@@@.
 
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