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Tax Time! Ask me anything about Ride-share Taxes

UberTaxPro

Well-Known Member
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I always like to help DIY ride-share tax preparers and this year I've teamed up with UberPeople.net to provide members with a DIY alternative. For only $160 I'll personally prepare and file your ride-share tax return including your state return if necessary! UberTaxPro.com

Just imagine not having to give up valuable driving (or sleeping) time to get your taxes done this year. You won't have to deal with software, the new tax law or any of the other issues DIYers talk about on here everyday. Most importantly, you'll know your taxes were done correctly by a licensed tax pro. (Enrolled Agent)

Let's face it, in the ride-share business time is money. Does it make sense to spend your valuable time getting into a tax project when you have a $160 no hassle alternative right here? Keep driving and leave the tax work to me! Get started here...UberTaxPro.com
 

UberTaxPro

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What no questions? I'm still here to help with questions! This wasn't meant to be only an advertisement!
 
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BigRedDriver

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It really is a great price for members!
I do have a question that was posed to me yesterday by a buddy of mine who’s daughter drives for “shiped”.

He accountant told her that she could deduct zero miles for her work delivering for them. To me that sounds absurd as she is considered an independent contractor.

He told her that, because she does not own the company she can’t claim the miles. She was issued a 1099.

Comment?
 

UberTaxPro

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I do have a question that was posed to me yesterday by a buddy of mine who’s daughter drives for “shiped”.

He accountant told her that she could deduct zero miles for her work delivering for them. To me that sounds absurrd as she is considered an independent contractor.

He told her that, because she does not own the company she can’t claim the miles. She was issued a 1099.

Comment?
Sounds absurd to me also! If she's an IC she obviously owns her own business. Could she perhaps be confused with ownership of the vehicle? She does have to own the vehicle (or lease) she's claiming expenses on. The one exception is a vehicle owned by a spouse who she would be filing jointly with. If it's not the vehicle ownership issue I suggest she get another accountant. When choosing an accountant I always suggest seeking out an EA, CPA, or attorney. Anyone can call themselves a tax preparer but only those with the credentials I mentioned have proven that they have the necessary knowledge. Also, you want to make sure that the person with credentials claiming to prepare the return is the person actually doing the work. Many of these big box tax places claim to have someone with credentials, but then pass the work onto people with no credentials or experience.
 

Launchpad McQuack

Well-Known Member
Many of these big box tax places claim to have someone with credentials, but then pass the work onto people with no credentials or experience.
I went to H&R Block once years ago because I got tangled up in an OID and didn't know how to handle it from a tax perspective. Never again. The woman that I worked with there was clueless. After about 20 minutes, it became painfully clear to me that I understood this stuff better than she did. Lesson learned. The only time you go to H&R Block is if you have a very simple return that you can do yourself, and if that is the case, why go to H&R Block at all?
 

LelioDriver

New Member
I always like to help DIY ride-share tax preparers and this year I've teamed up with UberPeople.net to provide members with a DIY alternative. For only $160 I'll personally prepare and file your ride-share tax return including your state return if necessary! UberTaxPro.com

Just imagine not having to give up valuable driving (or sleeping) time to get your taxes done this year. You won't have to deal with software, the new tax law or any of the other issues DIYers talk about on here everyday. Most importantly, you'll know your taxes were done correctly by a licensed tax pro. (Enrolled Agent)

Let's face it, in the ride-share business time is money. Does it make sense to spend your valuable time getting into a tax project when you have a $160 no hassle alternative right here? Keep driving and leave the tax work to me! Get started here...UberTaxPro.com
I have a question,
Uber is a second job for me.
Do I have to pay 32,5% tax plus GST of every trip that I receive? Or the GST will be deducted from the 32.5^ of tax?
Thank you
 

Rich C

New Member
I always like to help DIY ride-share tax preparers and this year I've teamed up with UberPeople.net to provide members with a DIY alternative. For only $160 I'll personally prepare and file your ride-share tax return including your state return if necessary! UberTaxPro.com

Just imagine not having to give up valuable driving (or sleeping) time to get your taxes done this year. You won't have to deal with software, the new tax law or any of the other issues DIYers talk about on here everyday. Most importantly, you'll know your taxes were done correctly by a licensed tax pro. (Enrolled Agent)

Let's face it, in the ride-share business time is money. Does it make sense to spend your valuable time getting into a tax project when you have a $160 no hassle alternative right here? Keep driving and leave the tax work to me! Get started here...UberTaxPro.com
I always like to help DIY ride-share tax preparers and this year I've teamed up with UberPeople.net to provide members with a DIY alternative. For only $160 I'll personally prepare and file your ride-share tax return including your state return if necessary! UberTaxPro.com

Just imagine not having to give up valuable driving (or sleeping) time to get your taxes done this year. You won't have to deal with software, the new tax law or any of the other issues DIYers talk about on here everyday. Most importantly, you'll know your taxes were done correctly by a licensed tax pro. (Enrolled Agent)

Let's face it, in the ride-share business time is money. Does it make sense to spend your valuable time getting into a tax project when you have a $160 no hassle alternative right here? Keep driving and leave the tax work to me! Get started here...UberTaxPro.com
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Can I deduct miles from home to the first ride? Also between rides the mileage ? If so I will go back and add up all those miles. Also will keep track from here on. Is using UBER weekly sheet best for proof? Thanks in advance for any info. Retired but don't want to end up paying taxes I don't have to.
 
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UberTaxPro

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Post automatically merged:

Can I deduct miles from home to the first ride? Also between rides the mileage ? If so I will go back and add up all those miles. Also will keep track from here on. Is using UBER weekly sheet best for proof? Thanks in advance for any info. Retired but don't want to end up paying taxes I don't have to.
If your're actively working from your house to first ride yes. By actively working I mean app on seeking rides driving to a ride etc...
Between miles same thing. You need to be keeping a mileage log. I prefer the app TripLog in manual mode to create the log.
 

100hoursuber

Active Member
I always like to help DIY ride-share tax preparers and this year I've teamed up with UberPeople.net to provide members with a DIY alternative. For only $160 I'll personally prepare and file your ride-share tax return including your state return if necessary! UberTaxPro.com

Just imagine not having to give up valuable driving (or sleeping) time to get your taxes done this year. You won't have to deal with software, the new tax law or any of the other issues DIYers talk about on here everyday. Most importantly, you'll know your taxes were done correctly by a licensed tax pro. (Enrolled Agent)

Let's face it, in the ride-share business time is money. Does it make sense to spend your valuable time getting into a tax project when you have a $160 no hassle alternative right here? Keep driving and leave the tax work to me! Get started here...UberTaxPro.com
I made like 15000 on uber and 200000 on my regular job. Own 2 house and 4 cars. Property tax about 11000. Paying my baby mom 2000 a month. I take care of my eldest parents in my home. I win some money at the casino and lose more. Can you file my tax for 160? I'm in DC.
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I made like 15000 on uber and 200000 on my regular job. Own 2 house and 4 cars. Property tax about 11000. Paying my baby mom 2000 a month. I take care of my eldest parents in my home. I win some money at the casino and lose more. Can you file my tax for 160? I'm in DC.
And my uber mileage is around 40000 miles.
 

UberTaxPro

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I made like 15000 on uber and 200000 on my regular job. Own 2 house and 4 cars. Property tax about 11000. Paying my baby mom 2000 a month. I take care of my eldest parents in my home. I win some money at the casino and lose more. Can you file my tax for 160? I'm in DC.
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And my uber mileage is around 40000 miles.
click the ubertaxpro.com link and send me your name and email and we'll talk
 

Rich C

New Member
Post automatically merged:

Can I deduct miles from home to the first ride? Also between rides the mileage ? If so I will go back and add up all those miles. Also will keep track from here on. Is using UBER weekly sheet best for proof? Thanks in advance for any info. Retired but don't want to end up paying taxes I don't have to.
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Which is the best one to use on Triplog? Noticed there are 3 different ones. Can you down load info to computer? Thanks
 

Uberman123456

Active Member
I appreciate the answers you've given in other threads.

I want to learn the process myself but I might be willing to hand over some cash for you to review my finished ones...sounds like a way better plan than an audit...
 

jgiun1

Well-Known Member
I always like to help DIY ride-share tax preparers and this year I've teamed up with UberPeople.net to provide members with a DIY alternative. For only $160 I'll personally prepare and file your ride-share tax return including your state return if necessary! UberTaxPro.com

Just imagine not having to give up valuable driving (or sleeping) time to get your taxes done this year. You won't have to deal with software, the new tax law or any of the other issues DIYers talk about on here everyday. Most importantly, you'll know your taxes were done correctly by a licensed tax pro. (Enrolled Agent)

Let's face it, in the ride-share business time is money. Does it make sense to spend your valuable time getting into a tax project when you have a $160 no hassle alternative right here? Keep driving and leave the tax work to me! Get started here...UberTaxPro.com
Dude...next year in going to use you!!! I kinda fell for the lure of nice chunks upfront on a AE card from Jackson Hewitt, just to get you in. Way too much in spending on them.
 

UberTaxPro

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No charge to review, that goes for 3 years back also. Just a warning....most of my ride-share return reviews turn into clients!
 

Launchpad McQuack

Well-Known Member
If you're actively working from your house to first ride yes. By actively working I mean app on seeking rides driving to a ride etc...
Is there a basis for this in Pub 463 or any other IRS document? I've been reading Pub 463 and the best I can figure is to treat each pickup/dropoff location as a temporary work location. If that is the correct thing to do, then it seems like the miles to your first pickup would only be deductible if you maintain a home office. I could be missing something, though. It's convoluted. I wish there was an IRS publication with guidelines specifically for people that drive for money. In other words, you're not driving to a job.......driving is the job.

UPDATE:

It says this in Pub 463.
IRS Publication 463 said:
Example 3. You have no regular office, and you don't have an office in your home. In this case, the location of your first business contact inside the metropolitan area is considered your office. Transportation expenses between your home and this first contact are nondeductible commuting expenses. Transportation expenses between your last business contact and your home are also nondeductible commuting expenses. While you can't deduct the costs of these trips, you can deduct the costs of going from one client or customer to another.
 
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