Snow night delivery

tofu97

Member
This past week I have done 2 Prime Now delivery route in snow. The first one was in the night (10pm - 12am block) and I was sent to this remote hill area. It was a really scaring experience because one of the customers live on this really steep slope. I drove there all up until to the point when my car started to slip and refused to move further up. At that point I had no choice but to park the car at the stop and carried a bag of dog food with another bag on foot to the house. I had to walk on a very slippy up-slope for 1/4 miles and then carefully descended down. At that point I was quite worried that my car could lose control when drove down the hill. Fortunately I was able to make it safely home eventually.

I think Amazon really should consider cancelling all orders automatically when weather condition is bad, or mandate that delivery drivers have right equipment such as snow chains brought in, then reduce the number of stops each driver needs to go.
 

oicu812

Well-Known Member
Amazon insurance covers your accidents while on a block. Until it becomes more expensive than to do something else, they will use the lowest cost option.

On a side note, if you didn't wear the proper clothing or equipment while doing deliveries, is it Amazon's fault if you got wet from rain/snow, slipped and fell because you were wearing sandles, or if you step in a hole in the dark and broke your ankle because you didn't use a flashlight?

There are plenty of flex drivers that don't work at night, work in the rain, work in the snow, etc.

As ICs, we need to be aware of our situations to keep ourselves safe.
 
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mke

Member
Snow tires are your best friend...

I don't mind working in the snow, but I do hold out for the extra rates, and I won't do it during a weekday rush hour. I do sometimes feel bad for the drivers who get a big shift in weather during a shift, you can get really hosed on those, good weather awareness is key.
 

jester121

Well-Known Member
Don't forget, you can always cancel your block 46 minutes ahead of time with no penalty, and pay it forward (to some other sucker, who hopefully has 4WD and good tires) -- that's how we build up those juicy block rates to $30+.
 
THat happened to me a few times. I live in Colorado so going to the mountains are the norm but sometimes these routes are too dangerous to complete unless you have an off road vehicle. Certain areas that I know my car will get stuck with no phone signal I call support and request a route reassignment. They always send me another route.

But
I’ve worked with Amazon for over a year and stay In The 99%~100% for realizability etc... so they are accommodating. If you’re new they might not assign it to someone else but it’s worth a try to ask.
 

oicu812

Well-Known Member
Is that access issue?
Unable to Access. If you can't get access to a delivery location (construction, closures, etc) such as steep icy road, then you can mark it UTA. If you were able to get to the delivery location, but there's a locked gate, dogs, in plain view, you can mark that NSL. NSL is only applicable if you were AT the delivery address and not a distance away.

Amazon knows the exact gps coordinates of where you scanned the package relative to the gps coordinates of the delivery address. They know whether you are 10 ft away or 100 ft away.
 

nighthawk398

Well-Known Member
Unable to Access. If you can't get access to a delivery location (construction, closures, etc) such as steep icy road, then you can mark it UTA. If you were able to get to the delivery location, but there's a locked gate, dogs, in plain view, you can mark that NSL. NSL is only applicable if you were AT the delivery address and not a distance away.

Amazon knows the exact gps coordinates of where you scanned the package relative to the gps coordinates of the delivery address. They know whether you are 10 ft away or 100 ft away.
Well that's why you will get that green circle at times but why not spell out NSL?
 

oicu812

Well-Known Member
You ever see package labels with NSL, UTA, BC spelled out? Most people understand what those abbreviations mean.
 

uberstuper

Well-Known Member
Unable to Access. If you can't get access to a delivery location (construction, closures, etc) such as steep icy road, then you can mark it UTA. If you were able to get to the delivery location, but there's a locked gate, dogs, in plain view, you can mark that NSL. NSL is only applicable if you were AT the delivery address and not a distance away.

Amazon knows the exact gps coordinates of where you scanned the package relative to the gps coordinates of the delivery address. They know whether you are 10 ft away or 100 ft away.
Amazon sees you while your sleeping ...they know when you're awake.... better deliver that package or they will terminate...
 

oicu812

Well-Known Member
Most? Only people that have done logistics a while I guess. Bc?
When you are unable to deliver a package for whatever reason, it's just the abbreviation (first letter of each word) of your options you can choose on why you couldn't deliver. Often when you return a package, you will also see the worker asking for the reason and writing the code on the package as Flex drivers rarely write anything on the packages. It makes the workers' job easier to sort the problems packages into separate racks.

BC = Business closed
NSL = No safe location
UTA = Unable to Access
Access Code Needed is also a UTA
 

jester121

Well-Known Member
I like to write big obnoxious messages in black sharpie marker, like "no such address, do not re-attempt per Joe @ Support" and "business closed Saturday & Sunday, no re-attempt before Monday".... stuff like that.

Not like I think it makes a bit of difference, but knowing someone reads that and then still stuffs it back in a sack for a go-back delivery block.... priceless.
 

oicu812

Well-Known Member
I like to write big obnoxious messages in black sharpie marker, like "no such address, do not re-attempt per Joe @ Support" and "business closed Saturday & Sunday, no re-attempt before Monday".... stuff like that.

Not like I think it makes a bit of difference, but knowing someone reads that and then still stuffs it back in a sack for a go-back delivery block.... priceless.
I think Amazon only cares about getting the package(s) delivered. The stations would do re-attempts in the afternoons for packages returned from the morning blocks. Lots of times, those undeliverables are returned again for another attempt for the evenings.
 

uberstuper

Well-Known Member
I think Amazon only cares about getting the package(s) delivered. The stations would do re-attempts in the afternoons for packages returned from the morning blocks. Lots of times, those undeliverables are returned again for another attempt for the evenings.
All reasons not to do afternoon/ evening blocks . Nothing but headaches
 
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