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Service Animal Update

Shangsta

Well-Known Member
According to my GLH, plenty of drivers thinking they can refuse service to pax with a service animal. Now if a pax reports refusal driver is auto deactivated

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Better hope someone without a dog wanting a free ride doesn't say you refused them and their service dog
 

Ms Stein Fanboy

Well-Known Member
According to my GLH, plenty of drivers thinking they can refuse service to pax with a service animal. Now if a pax reports refusal driver is auto deactivated

View attachment 99674

Better hope someone without a dog wanting a free ride doesn't say you refused them and their service dog
Can you sue them for lost wages due to their dishonesty, with a gig like this? I've yet to have a serious lie against me in 3 years. I don't think most pax would even think of this lie anyways. There's the more common lies like bad route, or whatever. Pretty easy to prove someone doesn't really have a service dog, IF you can even arrange to prove it that is.
 

Ms Stein Fanboy

Well-Known Member
If Uber axes you with a 'fatal' decision based upon a passenger lie, you could have a frustrating task ahead.

Customer service is a joke, and local offices are staffed with cheap workers that lack authority to override some issues. Results may vary.
And security for when you raise your voice because they keep repeating the same not quite relevant thing while pretending you aren't saying what you're saying.
 

steveK2016

Well-Known Member
I have still yet to get a service animal, or any animal. However, I drive mostly in the evenings on Fri and Sat so not many people are looking to take their pets with them to dinner or to the bar/club.

My plan is to ask the two questions they say you can ask:

"Is that a service animal and what service is it trained to perform?"


If the answer isn't direct and to the point, or they say it's for emotional support.

"An emotional support animal is not the same as service animal and that lying about a service animal is punishable by federal law. Would you still like to continue?"


I think most people would just go with another Uber rather than call my bluff.

Would a bluff going even further work or am I pushing the limited?

"I'll never refuse service to a legitimate service animal so you are welcomed aboard at this time, however note, that I will report this encounter to verify the service animal. Lying about a service animal is punishable by federal law. Would you still like to continue?"
 

JimKE

Well-Known Member
I have still yet to get a service animal, or any animal. However, I drive mostly in the evenings on Fri and Sat so not many people are looking to take their pets with them to dinner or to the bar/club.

My plan is to ask the two questions they say you can ask:

"Is that a service animal and what service is it trained to perform?"


If the answer isn't direct and to the point, or they say it's for emotional support.

"An emotional support animal is not the same as service animal and that lying about a service animal is punishable by federal law. Would you still like to continue?"


I think most people would just go with another Uber rather than call my bluff.

Would a bluff going even further work or am I pushing the limited?

"I'll never refuse service to a legitimate service animal so you are welcomed aboard at this time, however note, that I will report this encounter to verify the service animal. Lying about a service animal is punishable by federal law. Would you still like to continue?"
One of the problems with this approach is that some states have far more stringent regulations than the Federal ADA.

I am not an expert on this subject, but I have read posts here which said that if a person makes almost any claim of support of any kind from an animal, it qualifies under that state's law. If that's correct, you could be right on the Federal law, but in trouble under state law.

So far this has been a non-issue for me. I've had one tiny dog with pax, and it was buttoned up in its carrier and incredibly well-behaved.
 

drivininsac

Active Member
As someone who is in need of a service animal for PTSD I take great interest in threads about it.

If a driver ever says ANYTHING about my service animal other than the two questions they are allowed to ask I WILL cancel the ride and send an email to Uber/Lyft about it. A service animal is necessary medical equipment as determined by a doctor.

Don't get me wrong, it I detest people who claim they have a service animal just to take their dog everywhere with them. But you are only allowed to ask 2 things for a reason.
 

steveK2016

Well-Known Member
One of the problems with this approach is that some states have far more stringent regulations than the Federal ADA.

I am not an expert on this subject, but I have read posts here which said that if a person makes almost any claim of support of any kind from an animal, it qualifies under that state's law. If that's correct, you could be right on the Federal law, but in trouble under state law.

So far this has been a non-issue for me. I've had one tiny dog with pax, and it was buttoned up in its carrier and incredibly well-behaved.
I'm confident that Georgia is not one of those states.

As someone who is in need of a service animal for PTSD I take great interest in threads about it.

If a driver ever says ANYTHING about my service animal other than the two questions they are allowed to ask I WILL cancel the ride and send an email to Uber/Lyft about it. A service animal is necessary medical equipment as determined by a doctor.

Don't get me wrong, it I detest people who claim they have a service animal just to take their dog everywhere with them. But you are only allowed to ask 2 things for a reason.
What did you think about my last line? This one, to attempt to weed out those without real Service Animals?

"I'll never refuse service to a legitimate service animal so you are welcomed aboard at this time, however note, that I will report this encounter to verify the service animal. Lying about a service animal is punishable by federal law. Would you like to continue?"
 

Elmo Burrito

Well-Known Member
According to my GLH, plenty of drivers thinking they can refuse service to pax with a service animal. Now if a pax reports refusal driver is auto deactivated

View attachment 99674

Better hope someone without a dog wanting a free ride doesn't say you refused them and their service dog
Yep that's right. My guess is, uber covers this requirement to drive for them bout as good as they cover the 1K deductible requirement. (When ya get in a fender bender and its your fault) Or, these drivers just aren't paying attention in Uber University. Lol!
 

drivininsac

Active Member
What did you think about my last line? This one, to attempt to weed out those without real Service Animals?

"I'll never refuse service to a legitimate service animal so you are welcomed aboard at this time, however note, that I will report this encounter to verify the service animal. Lying about a service animal is punishable by federal law. Would you like to continue?"
I would cancel the ride and contact Lyft/Uber. You are inadvertently accusing the passenger of a crime and threatening to report them to someone. Handlers of an actual service animal know exactly how to answer the two questions and they know you are only allowed to ask the two questions. The handlers are actually trained by the company providing the service animal, or who helped train the animal, in how to answer these questions. If the answers seems off to you then yes, as a driver, cancel the ride and inform the rider that you cannot transport them at this time. Then immediately email Lyft/Uber support with the exact wording of the passenger's response to the two questions and inform them that in your opinion the passenger's responses did not appear to indicate that the animal in question was actually a service animal.

Also, please remember that service animals are trained in public behavior and must not become aggressive to other people, animals, or show aggression of any kind. You, as a business owner, can reject service or ask a passenger to exit your vehicle if the animal shows any sign of aggression. Most service animals are trained to just lay down and enjoy the ride.
 

steveK2016

Well-Known Member
I would cancel the ride and contact Lyft/Uber. You are inadvertently accusing the passenger of a crime and threatening to report them to someone. Handlers of an actual service animal know exactly how to answer the two questions and they know you are only allowed to ask the two questions. The handlers are actually trained by the company providing the service animal, or who helped train the animal, in how to answer these questions. If the answers seems off to you then yes, as a driver, cancel the ride and inform the rider that you cannot transport them at this time. Then immediately email Lyft/Uber support with the exact wording of the passenger's response to the two questions and inform them that in your opinion the passenger's responses did not appear to indicate that the animal in question was actually a service animal.

Also, please remember that service animals are trained in public behavior and must not become aggressive to other people, animals, or show aggression of any kind. You, as a business owner, can reject service or ask a passenger to exit your vehicle if the animal shows any sign of aggression. Most service animals are trained to just lay down and enjoy the ride.
When do those without service animals recieve the specialized training to know the correct answers to the two questions?
 
You can get almost any dog registered as a service animal by claiming it simply helps with anxiety or depression. No special training required.

But my question is - what if you get a service animal (even it if is legit) and it leaves friggin' hair all over your seats? Are you entitled to a cleaning fee?
 

drivininsac

Active Member
You can get almost any dog registered as a service animal by claiming it simply helps with anxiety or depression. No special training required.

But my question is - what if you get a service animal (even it if is legit) and it leaves friggin' hair all over your seats? Are you entitled to a cleaning fee?
No, you can't. There is NO registry for service animals. And yes special training is required. That is why there is the second question. "What tasks is the animal TRAINED to perform?"

As for your second question regarding a cleaning fee. I would say no, you don't get a cleaning fee. That is penalizing someone with a disability for having their medically needed animal with them. Now if the animal defecates or urinates in your vehicle then yes, ask for that cleaning fee. But hair? No.
 
No, you can't. There is NO registry for service animals. And yes special training is required. That is why there is the second question. "What tasks is the animal TRAINED to perform?"

As for your second question regarding a cleaning fee. I would say no, you don't get a cleaning fee. That is penalizing someone with a disability for having their medically needed animal with them. Now if the animal defecates or urinates in your vehicle then yes, ask for that cleaning fee. But hair? No.
Yes... you can. I know 3 people here that have done that. 1 guy did it just so he could take his awesome dog to his boring job. The other 2 did it specifically because they lived in great apartments that had no-pet policies. They just had to fill out a form, send something like $45, and that was that. They didn't have any special training other than to not shit indoors.

Trying to clean animal hair from upholstery can take a long time. It's not fair to expect people to have to do that. I'll have to email Uber and ask if they have any precedence or official rules on that one. Otherwise, everybody is just going to start saying they're allergic to dogs.
 

drivininsac

Active Member
Yes... you can. I know 3 people here that have done that. 1 guy did it just so he could take his awesome dog to his boring job. The other 2 did it specifically because they lived in great apartments that had no-pet policies. They just had to fill out a form, send something like $45, and that was that. They didn't have any special training other than to not shit indoors.

Trying to clean animal hair from upholstery can take a long time. It's not fair to expect people to have to do that. I'll have to email Uber and ask if they have any precedence or official rules on that one. Otherwise, everybody is just going to start saying they're allergic to dogs.
Please let us know what Uber says about a cleaning fee! It is an interesting question. And allergies aren't a sufficient reason to deny a service animal.

As for your friends, they got ripped off for $45. There is NO refistration requirement for service animals. They are also committing a crime unless their animal helps to mitigate a disability that is verifiable by a doctor.
 
Please let us know what Uber says about a cleaning fee! It is an interesting question. And allergies aren't a sufficient reason to deny a service animal.

As for your friends, they got ripped off for $45. There is NO refistration requirement for service animals. They are also committing a crime unless their animal helps to mitigate a disability that is verifiable by a doctor.
Allergies aren't a sufficient reason to deny a service animal? They sure are! If you're severely allergic to an animal, no reasonable person or agency is going to expect you to endanger your health. Hell, the Uber thing already said service animals can be denied for allergies or religious beliefs (which is just silly).

But no, they didn't get ripped off. They got whatever paperwork in the mail. The HR department had no problem letting the guy bring his dog to work after that. The two people (who lived at different apartment complexes, btw) had no issues from their leasing offices. I'll see if I can find the link to the organization that handles all that stuff. I could have sworn they also provided a bunch of legal info along with the forms.
 

JimKE

Well-Known Member
Handlers of an actual service animal know exactly how to answer the two questions and they know you are only allowed to ask the two questions. The handlers are actually trained by the company providing the service animal, or who helped train the animal, in how to answer these questions.
I have not run into service animals while Ubering, but I have run into them in other settings -- and THIS exactly matches my experience.

You can't ask a person what their disability is -- but the legit ones will tell you exactly what the dog does for them.

And, as an EMT, I can tell you that legit service dogs are just as important as meds and other things disabled people NEED. Service dogs save lives.

Just so you know, there is no "credential" or any kind of document, that "certifies" a service dog. Cards, certificates, vests, and all sorts of stuff can be purchased online by anyone, but none of those are official. There is no legitimate "service dog registry," and the more "credentials" somebody shows me, the more skeptical I would become.

Just ask what service the animal is trained to provide and you'll get a perfect, specific answer -- or not.

You can get almost any dog registered as a service animal by claiming it simply helps with anxiety or depression. No special training required.
There is no such thing as a "registered" service animal. That's a fraudulent scheme.

But my question is - what if you get a service animal (even it if is legit) and it leaves friggin' hair all over your seats? Are you entitled to a cleaning fee?
NO. Legitimate question, but no.
 
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