Seattle passes minimum wage rate for Uber and Lyft drivers

melusine3

Well-Known Member
Four surgeries and about 1 1/2 months in a hospital along with not being able to work for 9 months wiped me out financially. About $400k in medical bills. I had to resort to Medicaid to pay the bills but now can't net more than $16,750 per year.


That's for sure. I got my start with appraisers by converting offices from typewriters to pc's. Even back then people were saying Computer Valuation Models would replace appraisers. I don't see it happening anytime soon. There is almost always something atypical concerning the subject or a comparable sale. Condition, location, and views are just a few subjective variables CVM's have difficulties quantifying but can be critical to an accurate appraisal. Lenders understand this and is why they continue to hire appraisers.
There's no way computers can assess a house interior, nor can it evaluate whether or not the neighborhood is thriving. I don't appraise, but I do do comps for homes and I look at each one to make sure it's close to the home I'm selling. A computer can't make that type of distinction. You can drop off of medicaid once you're healthy again, get back to work.
 

bsliv

Well-Known Member
You can drop off of medicaid once you're healthy again, get back to work.
Even working full time, I don't know if I could afford to drop medicaid. Immunotherapy is $9500 every 3 weeks. A brain MRI every 6 months is $5000. A chest PET/CT scan is $5000 every 6 months. Those 3 expenses come to $185,000 per year. One week last month I had 5 doctors appointments (primary care physician, oncologist, pulminolgist, cardiologist, neurologist, and surgeon). They run $135 to $200 each. I have 5 prescriptions that aren't real cheap. My oncologist says if I remain cancer free for 10 years, I can consider I beat cancer. Its been 14 months, so I have 8+ years of these expenses. An appraiser can make $150 K/yr working full time. The math says I'm a pauper for the next 8 years. The statistics say I won't make 5 years. The most important thing I can say is STOP SMOKING CIGARETTES. I smoked over a pack a day for 35 years and went cold turkey over a year ago when I was diagnosed. It can be done.

The second most important thing I can add to this forum is my experience in economics. A free market works to create the maximum benefit to the economy and those participating in the market. The more government regulation and taxes, the less free the market. But I understand regulation and taxes are required, to a certain degree. To word it a different way, I understand its necessary to hamper the economy in order to benefit a few. The argument is: how much hampering vs. how much benefit to how few individuals.

To make this post applicable to this thread, Seattle has increased unemployment, increased cost to riders, and increased inflation (which hurts low income workers more than high income workers). The question is whether the damage to the economy is less than the benefit to the individuals. Since Seattle's prevailing wage is above the minimum wage, the damage is little. The benefit is yet to be determined. Drivers in the Seattle market should let us know how its working. Is it better to have slightly fewer pax but slightly higher fare per pax?

Despite how its working in Seattle, other market shouldn't necessarily follow its lead. Seattle has a high cost of living, high predominant hourly wage, and relatively low unemployment.
 
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Amos69

Well-Known Member
Most of the section 8s were down in the 'hood somewhere.
Heres a point of interest. Most of those Ghetto / Hood buildings were built as public low income housing after the great depression. Look what they turned into.

Building MORE low income housing modeled after the super cheap Community block style will just lead to a replacement of the now failing structures that exist in most ghettos.

Section 8 as a model is OK as it in no way limits housing to specific region like the Ghetto. Rent subsidy programs are a better way to show and encourage lower income people that they can "Do Best" Lulls


We do need to help people out and up but they really need to participate in the process. Rent subsidies can help people find better situations and programs that push them forward can do exactly that. Building hulking structures to force them to congregate will only lead to future problems in the ghetto.
 

Stevie The magic Unicorn

Well-Known Member
Build housing in small towns and rural areas, where there’s space to breath. Bring jobs back from overseas.

Then you have small towns urbanizing and a never ending urban sprawl while the older inner city collaspes further into disrepair before getting leveled into a new Blurnsball stadium or shopping mall....
 

Amos69

Well-Known Member
Then you have small towns urbanizing and a never ending urban sprawl while the older inner city collaspes further into disrepair before getting leveled into a new Blurnsball stadium or shopping mall....
Have you looked around? That is called gentrification. That is where we already are. Everything changes, except often times gubermintal response. We have to stop making the same mistakes we made in the 50's and 60's etc.

Here in the city of Seattle they spent over $ 150,000,000 on the homeless situation in 2019 with no measurable results. This is not including all the subsidized housing and other programs as well as just very low income people living in the projects.

There has to be a better way. Whenever you group people together you tend to get groupthink and groupcommunity. If we are going to actually work on these situations we need to do different things.

We are not even talking about homelessness here. This is just subsidized housing in lieu of rent control.
 

dauction

Well-Known Member
EDUCATION.. Obama had that right.

Education is Key to reducing poverty and crime, especially in black neighborhoods that are stuck in the never-ending circle of poverty, welfare, and crime.


I pick up hundreds of Black college students. Students from the USA, Kenya , Somalia, Ethiopia etc... All these students are working towards a goal of graduating with an advanced degree in Technology, Business, and engineering Degrees. They work at least one job and many 2.

They are generally all polite, they dress well, and no gangsta crap.


ON the other hand, I can pick up the USA hood born kids that are not going to College, their pants down to their cracks, wearing jerseys 2 sizes too big, fake jewelry, and talking like ebonics is areal thing. Welfare Moma with 3 kids in tow and thinking the best way to get a raise is to have another kid.


It isn't that they are bad people, it's that they grew up in an environment that thinks it's OK to live that way. You can take those same kids give them a real education and they grow up respectful and hardworking and living with a purpose.


Free College? Maybe subsidized/investments by Businesses? Google needs technology graduates and then invests in providing funding for those that contract to work for Google for say the first 3 years after college ..then free to work forever they want type of thing?


I don't know, what I do know is that education does work at lifting people out of poverty and the behaviors that go with it
 

Stevie The magic Unicorn

Well-Known Member
Have you looked around? That is called gentrification.

First I described the creation of the suburbs and the growth of new urban areas from small towns that used to just be bedroom communities than I described gentrification, pretty much a textbook example, and I threw in a Futurama reference laughs.

my point is that moving out of the city into a cheaper suburb is a never ending cycle that eventually leads to urban sprawl and an inevitible cycle of gentrification.


My prediction on the future is that lower income folks are going to live in the suburbs that us white kids grew up in and the rich folks are going to live in the city. As more and more inner city communities are wiped off the map and gentrified into fancy high rises eventually the rich folks will move back downtown.

Their old McMansions will be split into multi-unit housing.

Then public transportation will actually receive good funding and only poor people will own their own cars...

the rich folks will take ubers and the bus because it's cool.....
 

Oscar Levant

Well-Known Member
Heres a point of interest. Most of those Ghetto / Hood buildings were built as public low income housing after the great depression. Look what they turned into.

Building MORE low income housing modeled after the super cheap Community block style will just lead to a replacement of the now failing structures that exist in most ghettos.

Section 8 as a model is OK as it in no way limits housing to specific region like the Ghetto. Rent subsidy programs are a better way to show and encourage lower income people that they can "Do Best" Lulls


We do need to help people out and up but they really need to participate in the process. Rent subsidies can help people find better situations and programs that push them forward can do exactly that. Building hulking structures to force them to congregate will only lead to future problems in the ghetto.

Why not quansot huts, that was done way back when with some success for the military, and they are cheap, eh?
I lived in one, as a child,as the rent was cheap--my dad had to sell his fishing boat, so he was looking for a job, and the area wasn't that bad at all, just outside of the military base in Port Hueneme, California.
 

Free willy

Well-Known Member
A brain MRI every 6 months is $5000. A chest PET/CT scan is $5000 every 6 months. Those 3 expenses come to $185,000 per year.
Our medical imaging system is about to change drastically - the cost of these scans we need to get done will be reduced to just a few hundred dollars each and the results will be clearer & obtained in minutes. Another year or two tops.



 

Free willy

Well-Known Member
It sounds too good to be true. But it also sounds exciting. The cost savings will be outstanding. The life savings will be incalculable.
Yes, for the consumer but this is where hospitals make most of their profits, so it will be challenging for them. Will some merge, close? I really don't care as I too have to lay down in one of those scanners every 6 months (40 years of smoking). It would be great to be able to run my own scan from the comfort of my home.
 
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