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Safety Issues with ride-share vehicles

Lissetti

Honey Badger
Article Manager
Moderator
One in 6 Uber and Lyft Cars Have Open Safety Recalls, Consumer Reports' Study Suggests
CR's review of 94,000 vehicle records in New York City and Seattle area shows companies do little to address open recalls

By Ryan Felton
May 21, 2019



Among the tens of thousands of Uber and Lyft vehicles registered to operate in New York City, there’s a 2011 Hyundai Sonata GLS with eight unaddressed safety recalls that range from a potential seat-belt detachment to even more alarming examples, such as possible engine failure.

Millions of riders rely on ride-hailing services Uber and Lyft for daily transportation. But according to a Consumer Reports review of data from New York City and the Seattle area, a notable number of ride-hail vehicles registered for Uber and Lyft service, about 1 in 6, carry unaddressed safety defects.

"Uber and Lyft are letting down their customers and jeopardizing their trust," says William Wallace, a CR safety policy advocate. "Uber's website says people can 'ride with confidence,' while Lyft promises 'peace of mind,' yet both companies fail to ensure that rideshare cars are free from safety defects that could put passengers at risk."

As Uber and Lyft announced becoming multibillion-dollar IPOs earlier this year, CR decided to check on the safety of the privately owned vehicles that are key to company operations and are now used by more than 100 million consumers.

CR reviewed safety records for about 94,000 vehicles registered as operating for the companies in NYC and King County, Wash. (home to Seattle), two major ride-hailing hubs with local governments that require drivers to register vehicles and obtain an additional license to work through regulators. The CR analysis of the data is meant to provide a snapshot of open safety recalls among ride-hailing cars in the industry, but it might not reflect the national market.

We found vehicles with glaring issues that pose serious risks, such as deadly Takata airbags that could hurt or kill the driver or front-seat passengers. There were unfixed defects involving the potential for vehicles to catch fire or for engines to lose power entirely. For example, one of the 2011 Sonata’s open recall notices says, “Engine failure would result in a vehicle stall, increasing the risk of a crash.”

It’s unclear whether any ride-hail customer or driver has been injured because of an issue related to an open safety recall, and the rate of open recalls we found for registered ride-hail vehicles in our investigation is about the same rate estimated for all vehicles on the road. But as Uber and Lyft aim to transform daily transportation for consumers, they’ve taken only minor steps to ensure their drivers get recalls addressed, CR’s review found. And that could have unintended consequences for the riding public.

CR thinks stronger safety recall laws are needed, especially as Uber and Lyft work to grow their business in the coming years and as other smaller players enter the industry.

Uber and Lyft allow vehicles on their platforms as long as they are legally registered and no more than 10 to 15 years old, depending on the area where they're located. Local ordinances may be more restrictive, with requirements for a vehicle inspection or for drivers to obtain a legal permit to work. But neither company has a black-and-white policy in place regarding all open recalls.

In response to our questions, Uber and Lyft said they’ve taken a number of steps to address unfixed recalls in vehicles on their platforms. Uber, in particular, says it encourages and reminds drivers to get recalls fixed, and it identifies and blocks vehicles on its platform that have some of the most dangerous open recalls, ones with “DO NOT DRIVE” warnings from the manufacturer or the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

Those warnings, however, make up only a sliver of all vehicles on the road with unaddressed recalls.

"Uber, Lyft, taxi companies, and anyone offering for-hire rides should check cars for open recalls, and ban any with unrepaired safety defects from picking up passengers," CR's Wallace says. "If they won't do so, states and local governments should make them."

CR’s review also found that:
  • About 1 in 6: Of the 93,958 vehicle identification numbers (VINs) associated with ride-hailing vehicles in New York City and King County, Wash., that CR examined, 15,175, or 16.2 percent, had one or more open safety recalls. (Because ride-hailing drivers can work for more than one company, we grouped results together for vehicles associated with Uber, Lyft, and, for New York, smaller competitors Juno and Via.)

  • Takata: A number of vehicles have outstanding recalls associated with numerous deaths, such as faulty airbags made by Japanese car-parts manufacturer Takata. Those airbags have been linked to 24 deaths across the world, including 16 in the U.S., and remain in 1,274 of the vehicles cited in CR’s review, about 1.4 percent of the total.

  • Problem vehicles: Some vehicles had a significant number of open safety recalls: 25 vehicles in the Seattle area and NYC had at least five or more unfixed recalls.

  • On a par with all private vehicles: The Uber and Lyft vehicles we looked at are about on a par with all personal vehicles on the road. Our analysis also found the open recall rate for some other for-hire vehicle services in NYC to be slightly higher. CR reviewed more than 32,000 VINs affiliated with for-hire vehicles, such as traditional taxis, limos, and liveries, and found the open recall rate for that group to be 23.6 percent.

  • Cars older than a decade: The ride-hailing companies both have varying standards for vehicle eligibility, depending on the city or type of service, but there appear to be slips in enforcing the rules. In Seattle, for example, Uber and Lyft currently say vehicles should be no more than a decade old. But CR’s review of records from King County found more than 40 cars licensed to operate there with a listed vehicle model year of 2007 or older. Uber says under King County regulations enacted in March, permits will no longer be issued to drivers with vehicles more than a decade old. Lyft says it considers any vehicle with a current window decal that's legally needed to drive as valid to operate on its platform.

  • Onus on drivers: Uber and Lyft take only minor steps to ensure open recalls are addressed, leaving the onus primarily on drivers.


    Uber and Lyft representatives told CR in written statements that a number of initiatives are in place to encourage drivers to address recalls.

 

WAHN

Well-Known Member
  • On a par with all private vehicles: The Uber and Lyft vehicles we looked at are about on a par with all personal vehicles on the road. Our analysis also found the open recall rate for some other for-hire vehicle services in NYC to be slightly higher. CR reviewed more than 32,000 VINs affiliated with for-hire vehicles, such as traditional taxis, limos, and liveries, and found the open recall rate for that group to be 23.6 percent.
So, essentially RS car are no more and no less safe than the average citizen. So really a non-story.

Naturally, that's not how the headline makes it look.

Of course, the headline could have read that RS cars are over 3 times more likely to have recall issues fixed than vehicles in the other for-hire industries.

"There are three kinds of lies: lies, damned lies, and statistics."
 

ABC123DEF

Well-Known Member
And the REST of the cars don't have the regular necessary maintenance done to them because most drivers can't afford it. It sure is fun giving Uber negative publicity. You live by the internet...and die by the internet.

And remember: Uber is a TECH company! :p
 
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Lissetti

Honey Badger
Article Manager
Moderator
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #5
The local news was running this story all morning. All I could think was, "Great! Another Rideshare scare story to run folks away from Uber/Lyft." As it always is with cases like this, a few bad driver horror stories make the news and the rest of us that fully comply with Uber/ Lyft TOS and safety requirements, have to deal with the repercussions from skittish pax for the next few months....until they are off to the next rideshare injustice issue.
 

Kevin.G

Member
um... reality check.... we are responsible for every person that enters our vehicle... that means you lazyass people that make the conscious choice to not address the safety of your vehicle should and will be held directly responsible for any and all injuries to your passenger resulting from these or any other car related safety issue....

....thinking time...

Most recalls are free, so no absolutely excuse there.... other issues may not be free and will likely cost the vehicle owner whatever the cost to fix the problem, welcome to car ownership.... okay..... now lets look at a customer that is suing your ass for millions precisely because you were too damn lazy to fix your damn car.... hhhhmmmm.... think long and hard about this.... which is cheaper and easier and won't screw your entire life or the lives of others.... I wonder how many are re-thinking this and how many just ignored everything I wrote after "reality check".
 

Lissetti

Honey Badger
Article Manager
Moderator
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #8
um... reality check.... we are responsible for every person that enters our vehicle... that means you lazyass people that make the conscious choice to not address the safety of your vehicle should and will be held directly responsible for any and all injuries to your passenger resulting from these or any other car related safety issue....

....thinking time...

Most recalls are free, so no absolutely excuse there.... other issues may not be free and will likely cost the vehicle owner whatever the cost to fix the problem, welcome to car ownership.... okay..... now lets look at a customer that is suing your ass for millions precisely because you were too damn lazy to fix your damn car.... hhhhmmmm.... think long and hard about this.... which is cheaper and easier and won't screw your entire life or the lives of others.... I wonder how many are re-thinking this and how many just ignored everything I wrote after "reality check".
Almost every day in my city I see an Uber/ Lyft car with body damage. Doors severely bashed in, quarter panels.....and rear end collision style damage to the front of the vehicle. This damage always looks old, with in some cases the body parts are bungie strapped to the car. I always wonder how are they working on the platform so I glance inside. Sure enough I see a glowing app and sometimes even a pax in the back.
 

itsablackmarket

Well-Known Member
I tried to get a pic, but he was of course driving crazy fast and erratic. Yesterday I saw an uber/lyft driver with an very old, very junky looking PT cruiser. It looked terrible. I would not get in that piece of garbage. The driver was driving it hard, and it had a spare on the back passenger side. I wasn't sure whether to laugh or cry. I mean, on one hand this piece of junk is exactly what stupid cheap ungrateful passengers deserve, so I'm happy about that. But I'm unhappy about how stupid Uber and Lyft are that they don't have any quality control measures in place and more importantly with the rate cuts they really didn't see this coming even though they were repeatedly warned? I'm going to lose business because of that car. But funny, I don't blame that driver any more than I do Uber. They are one and the same. Both a product of a fallen trashy morally and intellectually bankrupt culture called American. These disrespectful losers deserve to eat each other alive with their garbage characters, and that car I saw was evidence that this is finally happening.
 
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I would guess that a very large percentage of ride share drivers are judgement proof and no lawyer is going to even try to sue them for millions.
Come to think of it, I had a friend that owned a trash removal company and he got screwed really bad in a divorce. He ended up living behind some relative's truck repair garage in a camping trailer and driving a 15 year old pickup. The camper caught fire and set the lumberyard next door on fire, I think it burned for 2 days. Next thing you know he gets served with papers and they were suing him for a couple of million. We all almost peed ourselves laughing. He owned nothing but a 15 year old pickup and a couple of thousand in the bank. It was before everything was computerized so I guess they were looking at his pre-divorce net worth
 

ABC123DEF

Well-Known Member
I tried to get a pic, but he was of course driving crazy fast and erratic. Yesterday I saw an uber/lyft driver with an very old, very junky looking PT cruiser. It looked terrible. I would not get in that piece of garbage. The driver was driving it hard, and it had a spare on the back passenger side. I wasn't sure whether to laugh or cry. I mean, on one hand this piece of junk is exactly what stupid cheap ungrateful passengers deserve, so I'm happy about that. But I'm unhappy about how stupid Uber and Lyft are that they don't have any quality control measures in place and more importantly with the rate cuts they really didn't see this coming even though they were repeatedly warned? I'm going to lose business because of that car. But funny, I don't blame that driver any more than I do Uber. They are one and the same. Both a product of a fallen trashy morally and intellectually bankrupt culture called American. These disrespectful losers deserve to eat each other alive with their garbage characters, and that car I saw was evidence that this is finally happening.
Yes, this was bound to happen once they went outside the 5-10 year car model allowance...and dropped the driver age from 25 to 21... to whatever it is now.
 

Ssgcraig

Well-Known Member
One in 6 Uber and Lyft Cars Have Open Safety Recalls, Consumer Reports' Study Suggests
CR's review of 94,000 vehicle records in New York City and Seattle area shows companies do little to address open recalls

By Ryan Felton
May 21, 2019



Among the tens of thousands of Uber and Lyft vehicles registered to operate in New York City, there’s a 2011 Hyundai Sonata GLS with eight unaddressed safety recalls that range from a potential seat-belt detachment to even more alarming examples, such as possible engine failure.

Millions of riders rely on ride-hailing services Uber and Lyft for daily transportation. But according to a Consumer Reports review of data from New York City and the Seattle area, a notable number of ride-hail vehicles registered for Uber and Lyft service, about 1 in 6, carry unaddressed safety defects.

"Uber and Lyft are letting down their customers and jeopardizing their trust," says William Wallace, a CR safety policy advocate. "Uber's website says people can 'ride with confidence,' while Lyft promises 'peace of mind,' yet both companies fail to ensure that rideshare cars are free from safety defects that could put passengers at risk."

As Uber and Lyft announced becoming multibillion-dollar IPOs earlier this year, CR decided to check on the safety of the privately owned vehicles that are key to company operations and are now used by more than 100 million consumers.

CR reviewed safety records for about 94,000 vehicles registered as operating for the companies in NYC and King County, Wash. (home to Seattle), two major ride-hailing hubs with local governments that require drivers to register vehicles and obtain an additional license to work through regulators. The CR analysis of the data is meant to provide a snapshot of open safety recalls among ride-hailing cars in the industry, but it might not reflect the national market.

We found vehicles with glaring issues that pose serious risks, such as deadly Takata airbags that could hurt or kill the driver or front-seat passengers. There were unfixed defects involving the potential for vehicles to catch fire or for engines to lose power entirely. For example, one of the 2011 Sonata’s open recall notices says, “Engine failure would result in a vehicle stall, increasing the risk of a crash.”

It’s unclear whether any ride-hail customer or driver has been injured because of an issue related to an open safety recall, and the rate of open recalls we found for registered ride-hail vehicles in our investigation is about the same rate estimated for all vehicles on the road. But as Uber and Lyft aim to transform daily transportation for consumers, they’ve taken only minor steps to ensure their drivers get recalls addressed, CR’s review found. And that could have unintended consequences for the riding public.

CR thinks stronger safety recall laws are needed, especially as Uber and Lyft work to grow their business in the coming years and as other smaller players enter the industry.

Uber and Lyft allow vehicles on their platforms as long as they are legally registered and no more than 10 to 15 years old, depending on the area where they're located. Local ordinances may be more restrictive, with requirements for a vehicle inspection or for drivers to obtain a legal permit to work. But neither company has a black-and-white policy in place regarding all open recalls.

In response to our questions, Uber and Lyft said they’ve taken a number of steps to address unfixed recalls in vehicles on their platforms. Uber, in particular, says it encourages and reminds drivers to get recalls fixed, and it identifies and blocks vehicles on its platform that have some of the most dangerous open recalls, ones with “DO NOT DRIVE” warnings from the manufacturer or the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

Those warnings, however, make up only a sliver of all vehicles on the road with unaddressed recalls.

"Uber, Lyft, taxi companies, and anyone offering for-hire rides should check cars for open recalls, and ban any with unrepaired safety defects from picking up passengers," CR's Wallace says. "If they won't do so, states and local governments should make them."

CR’s review also found that:
  • About 1 in 6: Of the 93,958 vehicle identification numbers (VINs) associated with ride-hailing vehicles in New York City and King County, Wash., that CR examined, 15,175, or 16.2 percent, had one or more open safety recalls. (Because ride-hailing drivers can work for more than one company, we grouped results together for vehicles associated with Uber, Lyft, and, for New York, smaller competitors Juno and Via.)

  • Takata: A number of vehicles have outstanding recalls associated with numerous deaths, such as faulty airbags made by Japanese car-parts manufacturer Takata. Those airbags have been linked to 24 deaths across the world, including 16 in the U.S., and remain in 1,274 of the vehicles cited in CR’s review, about 1.4 percent of the total.

  • Problem vehicles: Some vehicles had a significant number of open safety recalls: 25 vehicles in the Seattle area and NYC had at least five or more unfixed recalls.

  • On a par with all private vehicles: The Uber and Lyft vehicles we looked at are about on a par with all personal vehicles on the road. Our analysis also found the open recall rate for some other for-hire vehicle services in NYC to be slightly higher. CR reviewed more than 32,000 VINs affiliated with for-hire vehicles, such as traditional taxis, limos, and liveries, and found the open recall rate for that group to be 23.6 percent.

  • Cars older than a decade: The ride-hailing companies both have varying standards for vehicle eligibility, depending on the city or type of service, but there appear to be slips in enforcing the rules. In Seattle, for example, Uber and Lyft currently say vehicles should be no more than a decade old. But CR’s review of records from King County found more than 40 cars licensed to operate there with a listed vehicle model year of 2007 or older. Uber says under King County regulations enacted in March, permits will no longer be issued to drivers with vehicles more than a decade old. Lyft says it considers any vehicle with a current window decal that's legally needed to drive as valid to operate on its platform.

  • Onus on drivers: Uber and Lyft take only minor steps to ensure open recalls are addressed, leaving the onus primarily on drivers.


    Uber and Lyft representatives told CR in written statements that a number of initiatives are in place to encourage drivers to address recalls.

Easy solution, during the vehicle TNC inspection that we now have to go through, why wouldn't that check recalls?
Post automatically merged:

Yes, this was bound to happen once they went outside the 5-10 year car model allowance...and dropped the driver age from 25 to 21... to whatever it is now.
It's 16 in CA.
 
SURELY, you can't drive for Uber at 16 years old!!! :o-o:
16? Really? Doesn't that violate some kind of labor laws? When I was 16 I was on the school "work program" and did half days at school and then went to my job at a garage. The high school guidance councilor caught me driving a tow truck and I got in some kind of trouble. I think they were going to take away my working papers or something. That was in 1976 I think
 

FormerTaxiDriver♧

Well-Known Member
One in 6 Uber and Lyft Cars Have Open Safety Recalls, Consumer Reports' Study Suggests
CR's review of 94,000 vehicle records in New York City and Seattle area shows companies do little to address open recalls

By Ryan Felton
May 21, 2019



Among the tens of thousands of Uber and Lyft vehicles registered to operate in New York City, there’s a 2011 Hyundai Sonata GLS with eight unaddressed safety recalls that range from a potential seat-belt detachment to even more alarming examples, such as possible engine failure.

Millions of riders rely on ride-hailing services Uber and Lyft for daily transportation. But according to a Consumer Reports review of data from New York City and the Seattle area, a notable number of ride-hail vehicles registered for Uber and Lyft service, about 1 in 6, carry unaddressed safety defects.

"Uber and Lyft are letting down their customers and jeopardizing their trust," says William Wallace, a CR safety policy advocate. "Uber's website says people can 'ride with confidence,' while Lyft promises 'peace of mind,' yet both companies fail to ensure that rideshare cars are free from safety defects that could put passengers at risk."

As Uber and Lyft announced becoming multibillion-dollar IPOs earlier this year, CR decided to check on the safety of the privately owned vehicles that are key to company operations and are now used by more than 100 million consumers.

CR reviewed safety records for about 94,000 vehicles registered as operating for the companies in NYC and King County, Wash. (home to Seattle), two major ride-hailing hubs with local governments that require drivers to register vehicles and obtain an additional license to work through regulators. The CR analysis of the data is meant to provide a snapshot of open safety recalls among ride-hailing cars in the industry, but it might not reflect the national market.

We found vehicles with glaring issues that pose serious risks, such as deadly Takata airbags that could hurt or kill the driver or front-seat passengers. There were unfixed defects involving the potential for vehicles to catch fire or for engines to lose power entirely. For example, one of the 2011 Sonata’s open recall notices says, “Engine failure would result in a vehicle stall, increasing the risk of a crash.”

It’s unclear whether any ride-hail customer or driver has been injured because of an issue related to an open safety recall, and the rate of open recalls we found for registered ride-hail vehicles in our investigation is about the same rate estimated for all vehicles on the road. But as Uber and Lyft aim to transform daily transportation for consumers, they’ve taken only minor steps to ensure their drivers get recalls addressed, CR’s review found. And that could have unintended consequences for the riding public.

CR thinks stronger safety recall laws are needed, especially as Uber and Lyft work to grow their business in the coming years and as other smaller players enter the industry.

Uber and Lyft allow vehicles on their platforms as long as they are legally registered and no more than 10 to 15 years old, depending on the area where they're located. Local ordinances may be more restrictive, with requirements for a vehicle inspection or for drivers to obtain a legal permit to work. But neither company has a black-and-white policy in place regarding all open recalls.

In response to our questions, Uber and Lyft said they’ve taken a number of steps to address unfixed recalls in vehicles on their platforms. Uber, in particular, says it encourages and reminds drivers to get recalls fixed, and it identifies and blocks vehicles on its platform that have some of the most dangerous open recalls, ones with “DO NOT DRIVE” warnings from the manufacturer or the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

Those warnings, however, make up only a sliver of all vehicles on the road with unaddressed recalls.

"Uber, Lyft, taxi companies, and anyone offering for-hire rides should check cars for open recalls, and ban any with unrepaired safety defects from picking up passengers," CR's Wallace says. "If they won't do so, states and local governments should make them."

CR’s review also found that:
  • About 1 in 6: Of the 93,958 vehicle identification numbers (VINs) associated with ride-hailing vehicles in New York City and King County, Wash., that CR examined, 15,175, or 16.2 percent, had one or more open safety recalls. (Because ride-hailing drivers can work for more than one company, we grouped results together for vehicles associated with Uber, Lyft, and, for New York, smaller competitors Juno and Via.)

  • Takata: A number of vehicles have outstanding recalls associated with numerous deaths, such as faulty airbags made by Japanese car-parts manufacturer Takata. Those airbags have been linked to 24 deaths across the world, including 16 in the U.S., and remain in 1,274 of the vehicles cited in CR’s review, about 1.4 percent of the total.

  • Problem vehicles: Some vehicles had a significant number of open safety recalls: 25 vehicles in the Seattle area and NYC had at least five or more unfixed recalls.

  • On a par with all private vehicles: The Uber and Lyft vehicles we looked at are about on a par with all personal vehicles on the road. Our analysis also found the open recall rate for some other for-hire vehicle services in NYC to be slightly higher. CR reviewed more than 32,000 VINs affiliated with for-hire vehicles, such as traditional taxis, limos, and liveries, and found the open recall rate for that group to be 23.6 percent.

  • Cars older than a decade: The ride-hailing companies both have varying standards for vehicle eligibility, depending on the city or type of service, but there appear to be slips in enforcing the rules. In Seattle, for example, Uber and Lyft currently say vehicles should be no more than a decade old. But CR’s review of records from King County found more than 40 cars licensed to operate there with a listed vehicle model year of 2007 or older. Uber says under King County regulations enacted in March, permits will no longer be issued to drivers with vehicles more than a decade old. Lyft says it considers any vehicle with a current window decal that's legally needed to drive as valid to operate on its platform.

  • Onus on drivers: Uber and Lyft take only minor steps to ensure open recalls are addressed, leaving the onus primarily on drivers.


    Uber and Lyft representatives told CR in written statements that a number of initiatives are in place to encourage drivers to address recalls.

My Nissan Versa had issues.
 

Kevin.G

Member
Well to all those that think having nothing makes you "sue proof".... nope.... with a good lawyer, what this does is screw you for life.... get a good job and you end up getting hit, if not immediately then pretty damn soon.... try to sell an asset, pay up some more buddy.... go and get a good low interest loan, not likely to happen, although you probably could still get a loan but the interest will be quite high. Could look bad on financial background checks.

The person being sued could have extremely easily avoided any of these potential complications by simply fixing their damn car.... what is so scary about that?

And hey, let's take this lazyass attitude one more step... what if your unsafe car resulted in you killing a pax or someone else.... yes, yes this CAN happen....see ya later looser, all ya had to do was.... omg..... get off your lazy and potentially criminal ass and fix the damn car.

Why the hell is this even a conversation?
 

W00dbutcher

Active Member
16? Really? Doesn't that violate some kind of labor laws? When I was 16 I was on the school "work program" and did half days at school and then went to my job at a garage. The high school guidance councilor caught me driving a tow truck and I got in some kind of trouble. I think they were going to take away my working papers or something. That was in 1976 I think
Dont worry they will just set up a c.c. From mom and dad......
 
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