Rochester n00b checking in

TheChariot

New Member
Basically came here to validate all the little pitfalls, tactics, benefits, and other things I’ve noticed in my first few days with Uber. Turns out most of y’all have noticed all the same shit that I’ve seen, and have been for months.

So the supply:demand ratio seems to be against us a bit, no? Where do you guys think this will go? Increased demand? Decreased supply as people give up? Or is this where Rochester will probably settle?

Personally, I won’t be dropping it. I know that’s easy to say early on, but I live right off Park Ave and work in Henrietta. Both spots allow me to land some pings at convenient times. Ain’t a big deal to hop off my couch once the Bills game ends and make an easy $5.

Haven’t yet dipped into the late night scene, but my back seat cover and my barf bags just showed up from Amazon, so... bring it, Oxford’s.
 

Garbage Plate

Well-Known Member
Welcome aboard! Yeah Park Ave. will give you weekend night business, and Henrietta will give you rush hour rides, but right now you will find many a driver in the rider app. A lot more than before. Hopefully some will drop out but no guarantees. Tip number one: Ignore any ping over 15 minutes. Lyft is famous for those. I have a 12 minute limit but have done 15 if business is real slow. You will lose money on many of these long pickups if you do them. I learned the hard way.
 
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ShinyAndChrome

Well-Known Member
Yeah there are too many drivers.

I have been at it since mid august and if I'm totally honest my interest is very fast waning on this gig. These two reasons combined are why:

1) Over saturation of drivers means that making money during day light hours (yes even in henrietta) is increasingly hard. Your hourly gross will be lower in daylight hours plus your dead miles will be worse due to getting dragged all over. This will mean your take home is very low--remember gas is only one of your costs. Vehicle depreciation is for many of us higher than the cost of gas, then you still have maintenance/repairs on top of that. Last week I spent two hours in henrietta during rush hour and also on Saturday morning I spent a few hours and my take home in both times was well short of $10/hour. This is much worse than it was a month ago. There is just not enough passengers for the umpteen billion drivers now in Rochester.

2) The only time to go out for a meaningful shift and make good money is driving drunks around. Drunks introduce tons of issues. Will you enforce no open container rules in your car? Enjoy your 1 star rating. Will you prohibit them putting more in the car than the number of seatbelts? Enjoy your 1 star. The system encourages you to flaunt the rules and, while doing so, you put yourself in legal jeopardy with insurance and the law. All so that you can take home approximately what an entry level job at wegmans pays. It's probably a matter of time before a cop stops me in front of filgers dropping off pax, but they don't want to be driven around the block. And this gig does not pay enough money to cover tickets. Also my finances are put in jeopardy if I'm driving around a clown car and have an accident and insurance says sorry no.

Summary: Can't make any money during daylight hours. Can make money driving drunks but risk is very high.

You live in a great spot but I promise the "keep it on while tv is on while on the couch" thing will get very old, very fast, running out to your car, doing a quick trip, etc. it will become bothersome.
 

TheChariot

New Member
You live in a great spot but I promise the "keep it on while tv is on while on the couch" thing will get very old, very fast, running out to your car, doing a quick trip, etc. it will become bothersome.

I imagine that’s the case. I happen to be in a situation where I don’t have much else to do. I can only work 3 days a week at my day job, but I also get to pick my schedule. So basically those times hanging out at home wouldn’t be time where I’m trying to relax after work, but legit empty time. Still, you’re probably right... I might as well just hit the road.

Another thought that popped into my head: do you think Fall and Winter weather will increase demand? I suppose it could increase supply too, sadly, but I imagine that there will be less people willing to hoof it around town. Also will bring in things like Amerks games that we haven’t seen much of.

Personally, I’ve been happy as shit to take minimum fares as long as there’s high volume. A rainy weekend zipping back and forth between east ave and Monroe sounds peachy to me.
 

Merc7186

Well-Known Member
Shiny is right...I started right out of the gate and it was definitely better then. Yes, the number of riders was low then but I would say that the number of drivers has increased more (respectively) than the number of riders.

If you are willing to put up the drunks, your per hour earnings will increase bit so will the bullshit and issues.
 

ShinyAndChrome

Well-Known Member
Another thought that popped into my head: do you think Fall and Winter weather will increase demand? I suppose it could increase supply too, sadly, but I imagine that there will be less people willing to hoof it around town. Also will bring in things like Amerks games that we haven’t seen much of.
Fall won't, except for rain. Winter absolutely will. When you're driving down east ave look at all the people walking. When it's blowing snow they won't want to be doing that, though driving in winter conditions at night your risk as a driver goes up exponentially. I guess the real question is, by the time the winter weather comes will the supply:demand ratio be even worse than it is now? I don't believe it can get much worse. I don't mean that in a hysterical sense. I mean if it gets much worse even eager newbs are going to quit because they won't be satisfied grossing $6 hour sitting around when they could be watching netflix or going for a walk or doing a million other things in life.
 

Merc7186

Well-Known Member
...and the problem is? I want the eager noobs to quit because of low wages and the 'waiting on the couch drivers to look out and say 'nope, not today'...more for us that have developed a decent routine and found a way to make money.
 

JBinPenfield

Active Member
I'm a noob too. My experience with the number of drivers has been the opposite of others here. Since I started a few weeks ago, the number of drivers in my area near Rochester has decreased over the past few weeks during the early evening hours when I drive, inluding quite a few going TO bars including the Park Ave. area. I look at the passenger app and choose a place to wait that is well away from any other driver. I can usually find a spot that's over a mile away from the nearest one. Then if anyone in town wants a ride, I'm their man.

I think that the number of passengers should definitely pick up as time goes on. Uber is still pretty new to this area. Last night a passenger who moved here from Florida told me how little it was used among his friends here compared to where he came from, where a lot of people used it all the time.
 

Maven

Well-Known Member
U/L have horrible driver retention rates for the reasons given in this thread and many more.
Only a few last long enough to learn the tricks necessary to "succeed" (definitions vary).
Unfortunately, U/L keep recruiting new drivers, so the oversupply issue never completely goes away. :frown:
Plus it's only been 3 months. Lots more customers to recruit into the U/L lifestyle. :smiles:
 

TheChariot

New Member
A couple weeks in and I've picked up a couple of tricks that sound very basic and common sense:
1) routine
2) momentum

My day job allows me to make my own schedule, so I know exactly which days/times I'll be driving. My schedule sort of sucks for October, but I will streamline it next month, and I'm looking forward to the positive effect it will have on my Uber routine.

And to the 2nd point... you guys were ABSOLUTELY RIGHT. The sit-on-the-couch thing totally sucked. I'd either not get anything, or I'd get distracted by something better to do and turn the app off. The only time I'll be making stops at home is for personal pit stops to grab food/drink. I made more money and felt less annoyed when I was on the move for several rides in a row, and noticed that I was stringing together pings at a higher rate. You've gotta get off your ass and treat it like a job.
 

Maven

Well-Known Member

2 guys running from an 800-pound angry black bear. One says to his buddy, "Don't think .. gasp .. we can outrun .. gasp ..
the bear." Buddy replies, "That's OK .. gasp .. only need to .. gasp .. run faster then .. gasp .. you."

 
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JBinPenfield

Active Member
...dont treat it like a job, treat it like a hunt.....youre moving around and seeking out the next target.
First you have to know where the targets are. That's why I started driving from place to place around the city and burbs - to discover where the most pings came from and when. I started doing that last week. When I get enough data points to make some intelligent guesses on where to park, I'll want to be like a hunter in a tree stand, waiting for the deer to come to me - until its time to move on to another location and find a more active heard of deer. I'll be using less gas, putting less wear on the car that way. Whenever I do sit in one spot I have a book to read between pings.
 
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