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Ridesharing more than 20 hours as international student in Toronto?

The Student Guy

New Member
Hello everyone!
I am an international student in Toronto and I've worked with Uber about a month at this time. Last week I started to drive for Lyft as well. I realized, that I am driving about 30 hours per week (sometimes less, sometimes more), as I do not have study right now and I use most of my free time ubering.
I have a question:
Student permit allows me to work not more than 20 hours per week, however working just 20 hours is nothing, as about 30% of my time ridesharing I am just waiting for new request, or commuting to busy places (I live in Scarborough so it takes about 30 minutes to get downtown to catch the surge, so I am waisting an hour everyday commuting downtown and back, usually with no passengers, and as I am working 5 days a week it is 5 hours a week of unpaid "working time" right here:rolleyes:), so working less than 20 hours a week just not worth it.
So, my question is, what if I will continue driving more than 20 hours a week, will I face legal problems? Is there any way government might know about my excessive working time?

Thanks in advance for your answers guys!
Be safe on the road!:smiles:
 

Rakos

Well-Known Member
Stop worrying so much...

Look on accounts page...

Find Driving Time...

You will find a timer that tracks...

Your ACTUAL time working...

Waiting for a ping is NOT counted...

That should work to track your work time...

Good luck...!

Rakos
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Last edited:

The Student Guy

New Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #4
Stop worrying so much...

Look on accounts page...

Find Driving Time...

You will find a timer that tracks...

Your ACTUAL time working...

Waiting for a ping is NOT counted...

That should work to track your work time...

Good luck...!

Rakos
Thanks for your reply!
Isn't it counting all my driving time, even when I just driving around the area for example?
And the thing is not about getting the actual working time, but about possible problems from the government side, as I plan to apply for PR after I finish my education.
 

Fuzzyelvis

Well-Known Member
Hello everyone!
I am an international student in Toronto and I've worked with Uber about a month at this time. Last week I started to drive for Lyft as well. I realized, that I am driving about 30 hours per week (sometimes less, sometimes more), as I do not have study right now and I use most of my free time ubering.
I have a question:
Student permit allows me to work not more than 20 hours per week, however working just 20 hours is nothing, as about 30% of my time ridesharing I am just waiting for new request, or commuting to busy places (I live in Scarborough so it takes about 30 minutes to get downtown to catch the surge, so I am waisting an hour everyday commuting downtown and back, usually with no passengers, and as I am working 5 days a week it is 5 hours a week of unpaid "working time" right here:rolleyes:), so working less than 20 hours a week just not worth it.
So, my question is, what if I will continue driving more than 20 hours a week, will I face legal problems? Is there any way government might know about my excessive working time?

Thanks in advance for your answers guys!
Be safe on the road!:smiles:
Are you online during your "commute"? If not, why would it count? Doesn't count for a real job. By driving, do you mean online? Be specific.

You can check your online hours in the app under earnings. That will tell you your online hours, which is likely all anyone will ever look at if it comes up. Unless you keep the app on when you're unlikely to get a ping you want, your online hours will likely be a lot less than you're "working."

If you're questioned, show that. Keep it under 20 hours. Don't leave the app on unnecessarily. Your drive to "work" shouldn't be an issue as it wouldn't be if you got a "real" job in another town.
 

The Student Guy

New Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #6
Are you online during your "commute"? If so, why would it count? Doesn't count for a real job. By driving, do you mean online? Be specific.

You can check your online hours in the app under earnings. That will tell you your online hours, which is likely all anyone will ever look at if it comes up. Unless you keep the app on when you're unlikely to get a ping you want, your online hours will likely be a lot less than you're "working."

If you're questioned, show that. Keep it under 20 hours. Don't leave the app on unnecessarily. Your drive to "work" shouldn't be an issue as it wouldn't be if you got a "real" job in another town.
If I will switch my app off during commuting then I will end up earning about $6-7 per hour counting expenses on my car (I have Hyundai Santa Fe Sport, which is not the best car for ridesharing and I am getting not more than $10-11 per hour working ~30 hours a week, so I have to maximize my profit in any possible way), which is ridiculously low. The thing is that I am looking for requests while I do my long commuting from my home to downtown and back to minimize "empty miles" (I have to drive 25 km to downtown and back, so it is 50 km in total), so yes, I am keeping my app online all the time since I leave my home and till I get back. Also if I have a ride somewhere far from downtown Toronto (like 20 km), I have to do the same thing again - drive about 30 mins back with app on hoping to get a request. So this is becoming very tricky and if I will not use my app switched on all the time I will end up wasting my time and putting a lot of miles on my car for not more than $7 per hour, which is twice lower than minimum wage. At this point, it sounds more like driving around for "fun", rather working to get money.

And that is why this is so important for me to know what government might check here and what problems I might face, as if I will work 20 hours per week I will have not more than 15 hours of time that I was actually paid for, which does not sound like a fair job.
 

Fuzzyelvis

Well-Known Member
If I will switch my app off during commuting then I will end up earning about $6-7 per hour counting expenses on my car (I have Hyundai Santa Fe Sport, which is not the best car for ridesharing and I am getting not more than $10-11 per hour working ~30 hours a week, so I have to maximize my profit in any possible way), which is ridiculously low. The thing is that I am looking for requests while I do my long commuting from my home to downtown and back to minimize "empty miles" (I have to drive 25 km to downtown and back, so it is 50 km in total), so yes, I am keeping my app online all the time since I leave my home and till I get back. Also if I have a ride somewhere far from downtown Toronto (like 20 km), I have to do the same thing again - drive about 30 mins back with app on hoping to get a request. So this is becoming very tricky and if I will not use my app switched on all the time I will end up wasting my time and putting a lot of miles on my car for not more than $7 per hour, which is twice lower than minimum wage. At this point, it sounds more like driving around for "fun", rather working to get money.

And that is why this is so important for me to know what government might check here and what problems I might face, as if I will work 20 hours per week I will have not more than 15 hours of time that I was actually paid for, which does not sound like a fair job.
Well then get another job. Because if you're online and open to trips then you're working, and it's documented. So if anyone checks, you're screwed.

If you can get trips during your commute, then why commute? You may be wasting more effort getting that trip once in a while rather than just driving into town.

I have no good answer, except uber sux, and the pay IS bad. But from what I've read in these forums you should be able to do better than you are in your market.
 

The Student Guy

New Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #8
Well then get another job. Because if you're online and open to trips then you're working, and it's documented. So if anyone checks, you're screwed.

If you can get trips during your commute, then why commute? You may be wasting more effort getting that trip once in a while rather than just driving into town.

I have no good answer, except uber sux, and the pay IS bad. But from what I've read in these forums you should be able to do better than you are in your market.
Okay, thank you very much, I think I need to work fewer days in a week then...


There is also the next question:
If I work for both Lyft and Uber, do those hours add to each other? As when I am looking for a request both of my apps always switched on and there is a problem if those hours are counts together towards my 20 hour limit. For example, I have 15 hours with Uber and 10 hours for Lyft for a week, but 5 of those hours for both apps I was waiting for a request, commuting, etc. So realistically i worked 20 hours, but I have documented 25 hours of work. How does government can deal with this situation? :rolleyes:
 

SuzeCB

Well-Known Member
Okay, thank you very much, I think I need to work fewer days in a week then...


There is also the next question:
If I work for both Lyft and Uber, do those hours add to each other? As when I am looking for a request both of my apps always switched on and there is a problem if those hours are counts together towards my 20 hour limit. For example, I have 15 hours with Uber and 10 hours for Lyft for a week, but 5 of those hours for both apps I was waiting for a request, commuting, etc. So realistically i worked 20 hours, but I have documented 25 hours of work. How does government can deal with this situation? :rolleyes:
For your purposes with the government, yes, they both count. It's going to be too messy for you to separate the two and combine when they're both operative and separate when you're on one instead of the other. Trying to do that it's going to get very confusing very quickly, and you're going to start counting all of the hours that you're in the car with the intention of working. That is going to make you eat up your 20 allowed hours way too fast.

On the other hand, if you are not leaving both apps online at the same time, you can figure out the time by just adding the two together.
 

Kaal

Well-Known Member
Last edited:

The Student Guy

New Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #11
What you're doing is possibly illegal. At least it would be if you were an international student in the US unless you have a work permit. You're working "off-campus" if you're doing ride share.
I can work 20 hours off-campus and that is stated in my Study Permit, I did a research on it, do not worry. Many other students on my program work off-campus with no issues. In addition, Uber does not have a right to allow me to work if it is not stated in my Study Permit. The problem for me here is that how government perceives my hours (is it an actual working time with passengers or just time being online), will government check how many hours I was online, and how to deal with the situation when I work with multiple apps (Lyft + Uber).

For your purposes with the government, yes, they both count. It's going to be too messy for you to separate the two and combine when they're both operative and separate when you're on one instead of the other. Trying to do that it's going to get very confusing very quickly, and you're going to start counting all of the hours that you're in the car with the intention of working. That is going to make you eat up your 20 allowed hours way too fast.

On the other hand, if you are not leaving both apps online at the same time, you can figure out the time by just adding the two together.
Problem is not working with both apps at a time (which I did for a week very successfully), or counting my working hours on my own. Question is how government counts my hours. As with the example above, my apps could show 25 hours of work when I just worked for 20. If I will just tell them that I worked 20 hours (as I actually did in the example), but my apps say that I worked 25, will they believe me?
 

Gone_in_60_seconds

Well-Known Member
Hello everyone!
I am an international student in Toronto and I've worked with Uber about a month at this time. Last week I started to drive for Lyft as well. I realized, that I am driving about 30 hours per week (sometimes less, sometimes more), as I do not have study right now and I use most of my free time ubering.
I have a question:
Student permit allows me to work not more than 20 hours per week, however working just 20 hours is nothing, as about 30% of my time ridesharing I am just waiting for new request, or commuting to busy places (I live in Scarborough so it takes about 30 minutes to get downtown to catch the surge, so I am waisting an hour everyday commuting downtown and back, usually with no passengers, and as I am working 5 days a week it is 5 hours a week of unpaid "working time" right here:rolleyes:), so working less than 20 hours a week just not worth it.
So, my question is, what if I will continue driving more than 20 hours a week, will I face legal problems? Is there any way government might know about my excessive working time?

Thanks in advance for your answers guys!
Be safe on the road!:smiles:
Technically, you are violating the terms of your visa. They (CBSA or Immigration Department) could decide to not renew your visa after the current one expires. Because if you are a full time student here to study, how could you have so much time to work a job for more than 20 hours?:rolleyes::rolleyes:
 

The Student Guy

New Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #13
Technically, you are violating the terms of your visa. They (CBSA or Immigration Department) could decide to not renew your visa after the current one expires. Because if you are a full time student here to study, how could you have so much time to work a job for more than 20 hours?:rolleyes::rolleyes:
Thing is that I am transferring to a different program at this point and I have no study right now. So I have plenty of free time that I need to use in a useful way.
But yeah, I see your point, I believe I need to start working only on weekends to be as busy as possible and not wasting my 20 hours waiting for requests.
Thank you for the answer!
 

zauber99

Active Member
Technically, you are violating the terms of your visa. They (CBSA or Immigration Department) could decide to not renew your visa after the current one expires. Because if you are a full time student here to study, how could you have so much time to work a job for more than 20 hours?:rolleyes::rolleyes:
Key word technically. Wonder how cbsa or immigration are able to enforce this kind of situations?
 

METRO3

Well-Known Member
Hello everyone!
I am an international student in Toronto and I've worked with Uber about a month at this time. Last week I started to drive for Lyft as well. I realized, that I am driving about 30 hours per week (sometimes less, sometimes more), as I do not have study right now and I use most of my free time ubering.
I have a question:
Student permit allows me to work not more than 20 hours per week, however working just 20 hours is nothing, as about 30% of my time ridesharing I am just waiting for new request, or commuting to busy places (I live in Scarborough so it takes about 30 minutes to get downtown to catch the surge, so I am waisting an hour everyday commuting downtown and back, usually with no passengers, and as I am working 5 days a week it is 5 hours a week of unpaid "working time" right here:rolleyes:), so working less than 20 hours a week just not worth it.
So, my question is, what if I will continue driving more than 20 hours a week, will I face legal problems? Is there any way government might know about my excessive working time?

Thanks in advance for your answers guys!
Be safe on the road!:smiles:
I know someone who got into a lot of trouble working more than 20 on uber. I really suggest against this. The government is always watching
 

CDNcrippler1

Well-Known Member
Hello everyone!
I am an international student in Toronto and I've worked with Uber about a month at this time. Last week I started to drive for Lyft as well. I realized, that I am driving about 30 hours per week (sometimes less, sometimes more), as I do not have study right now and I use most of my free time ubering.
I have a question:
Student permit allows me to work not more than 20 hours per week, however working just 20 hours is nothing, as about 30% of my time ridesharing I am just waiting for new request, or commuting to busy places (I live in Scarborough so it takes about 30 minutes to get downtown to catch the surge, so I am waisting an hour everyday commuting downtown and back, usually with no passengers, and as I am working 5 days a week it is 5 hours a week of unpaid "working time" right here:rolleyes:), so working less than 20 hours a week just not worth it.
So, my question is, what if I will continue driving more than 20 hours a week, will I face legal problems? Is there any way government might know about my excessive working time?

Thanks in advance for your answers guys!
Be safe on the road!:smiles:
Hopefully deportation. You obviously don’t listen to any rules
 
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