Rich vs poor / working class pax

Benjamin M

Well-Known Member
Picked up what sounded based on his phone call to be a wealthy CEO last night. Like every pax, I asked him to buckle up. He seemed to take offense to this, heaven forbid he takes three seconds of his time to possibly save his life if we wrecked on the interstate.

Right after I dropped him off, first 2* rating. Guaranteed it was him, at least in my market the rating applies immediately. In my experience -

Rich pax -

  1. Entitled
  2. Drivers are "the help", lowest of the low
  3. @@@@@ about the smallest things
  4. Don't tip
Poor / working class -
  1. Grateful for a ride and usually polite
  2. Sometimes @@@@@ and low rate, usually due to racism
  3. Often tip, even if it's a buck (see #1) - my highest tips have been from this group, including $13 on a two mile fare
The middle ground seems to be middle class millennials, often neutral in terms of behavior and tipping.

I'd take a guy trying to get by like me over a CEO any day of the week. Some people..
 

swathdiver

Well-Known Member
My highest tips have come from wealthier folks so far. But we've all gotten along and had great chats too. I make it a goal to find something in common with everyone and so far I'm near 100%. Had one guy who didn't speak English but he was friendly enough. I do find that not all pax rate any stars at all, 64% of pax have rated my trips so far. Would like to get that near 100 since I give them all 5.
 

Benjamin M

Well-Known Member
My highest tips have come from wealthier folks so far. But we've all gotten along and had great chats too. I make it a goal to find something in common with everyone and so far I'm near 100%. Had one guy who didn't speak English but he was friendly enough. I do find that not all pax rate any stars at all, 64% of pax have rated my trips so far. Would like to get that near 100 since I give them all 5.
I think it really varies by the market. I've had some great wealthy pax who have tipped very well, but it's these stuffy middle age elites that seem to be the issue. Kind of have to ask why they are ordering Uber X in the first place?
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And I've only rated less than 5* maybe five times out of hundreds of trips. Karma will catch up.
 

Benjamin M

Well-Known Member
Picked up wealthy pax from the four seasons recently. I don’t know what he did for a living but I could tell he was loaded. The conversation was fine and he treated me with respect, plus $10 tip.
It really varies. I was respectful to this gentleman last night, pick up at a destination restaurant and drop off at the Sheraton. No tip, 2*.

One of my best tips of all time was that $13 from a working class guy going to the gym one night. Also a 5* and Excellent Service with a simple "thank you". Asked him to buckle up as well, in both cases that was the only communication.
 

dmoney155

Well-Known Member
Picked up what sounded based on his phone call to be a wealthy CEO last night. Like every pax, I asked him to buckle up. He seemed to take offense to this, heaven forbid he takes three seconds of his time to possibly save his life if we wrecked on the interstate.

Right after I dropped him off, first 2* rating. Guaranteed it was him, at least in my market the rating applies immediately. In my experience -

Rich pax -

  1. Entitled
  2. Drivers are "the help", lowest of the low
  3. @@@@@ about the smallest things
  4. Don't tip
Poor / working class -
  1. Grateful for a ride and usually polite
  2. Sometimes @@@@@ and low rate, usually due to racism
  3. Often tip, even if it's a buck (see #1) - my highest tips have been from this group, including $13 on a two mile fare
The middle ground seems to be middle class millennials, often neutral in terms of behavior and tipping.

I'd take a guy trying to get by like me over a CEO any day of the week. Some people..

I prefer the Rich pax.... in select/lux/black :smiles:

Be consumer oriented, pick up on pax vibes (likes/dislikes) and don't make mistakes. CEOs/Rich pax are way they are because low tolerance for bs is what got them where they are.
 

Benjamin M

Well-Known Member
I prefer the Rich pax.... in select/lux/black :smiles:

Be consumer oriented, pick up on pax vibes (likes/dislikes) and don't make mistakes. CEOs/Rich pax are way they are because low tolerance for bs is what got them where they are.
Asking nicely for them to buckle up and not saying another word unless spoken to (usually they're on their phone the whole trip, as he was) isn't being consumer oriented? ?

No, it's just how some look down on us common peasants. They view levels above X as being more deserving of respect.
 

Seamus

Well-Known Member
In the wealthy parts of the NYC suburbs, it is mixed. Funny that some VIP's who used to limo into Manhattan now are taking Uber X, not even a higher level!

Craziest was last year I pulled up to a gated large house and a man in a suit comes out. Tells me I will be taking "Ms X" and her assistant to the Theatre district in Manhattan. "Ms X" (don't need trouble so I won't get into who she was) is a well know actress past her prime. He starts reading me a list of rules (due not engage in conversation, please no eye contact, etc.etc..). After he was done reading me "the rules" I asked him if he realized this was an Uber X ride! Told him she would be better off in a Limo and Cancelled the ride! The look on his face was priceless!
 

Benjamin M

Well-Known Member
This is why I Insta 1 star folks like him just in case. Who cares if they buckle or not? PAX are not your kids, if they wind up in the windshield, it's on them.
Saw too many people who were dead or dying for being stupid enough not to buckle up. Not in my car.

And yes, I probably should have 1* rated. Especially when he barely acknowledged me when I wished him a good night.
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After he was done reading me "the rules" I asked him if he realized this was an Uber X ride! Told him she would be better off in a Limo and Cancelled the ride! The look on his face was priceless!
That's how to do it! Thanks for shutting that down, I would pay to see that on camera ?
 

oldfart

Well-Known Member
Picked up wealthy pax from the four seasons recently. I don’t know what he did for a living but I could tell he was loaded. The conversation was fine and he treated me with respect, plus $10 tip.

I drive a lot of wealthy people. And like everyone else if I treat them with respect, that’s what I get in return. And re: tips, if we can find some common ground, end “connect” in some way or if there is an “extra” service I can provide?, I get a tip
 

Benjamin M

Well-Known Member
I drive a lot of wealthy people. And like everyone else if I treat them with respect, that’s what I get in return. And re: tips, if we can find some common ground, end “connect” in some way or if there is an “extra” service I can provide?, I get a tip
My issue is that they're almost always on the phone the duration of the trip, can't really do anything but provide them with a safe and comfortable ride from A to B. Greet them warmly like any other pax.

It's almost like they feel dirty taking UberX, no idea why they do. Might not have a lot of Black cars in my market but there are lots of car services.
 

OldBay

Well-Known Member
Picked up what sounded based on his phone call to be a wealthy CEO last night. Like every pax, I asked him to buckle up. He seemed to take offense to this, heaven forbid he takes three seconds of his time to possibly save his life if we wrecked on the interstate.

Right after I dropped him off, first 2* rating. Guaranteed it was him, at least in my market the rating applies immediately. In my experience -

Rich pax -

  1. Entitled
  2. Drivers are "the help", lowest of the low
  3. @@@@@ about the smallest things
  4. Don't tip
Poor / working class -
  1. Grateful for a ride and usually polite
  2. Sometimes @@@@@ and low rate, usually due to racism
  3. Often tip, even if it's a buck (see #1) - my highest tips have been from this group, including $13 on a two mile fare
The middle ground seems to be middle class millennials, often neutral in terms of behavior and tipping.

I'd take a guy trying to get by like me over a CEO any day of the week. Some people..

Not at all sure about this. IME, wealthier people tip more frequently. Taxi/uber is a travel expense covered by their company most times, when shuttling professionals between hotels, conference centers, yacht club, and airports, tips are more likely than not.

It may have something to do with the car you drive, how well maintained (dents?), and how clean. My vehicle is larger and its in perfect condition, I can understand why a business pro would not tip someone driving a corolla. Not disrespect to tiny cars, but I think that's a factor.

When looking at lower/middle class pax, women seem to tip more than men. Maybe because they have experience in a service industry.
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I drive a lot of wealthy people. And like everyone else if I treat them with respect, that’s what I get in return. And re: tips, if we can find some common ground, end “connect” in some way or if there is an “extra” service I can provide?, I get a tip

I have gotten alot of tips from business guys who have been on the phone the whole trip.
 

Trafficat

Well-Known Member
I've actually found many of the wealthy pax to be very friendly and down to earth. To be honest, I don't find that income level is a good predictor of passenger behavior... although lower middle class seems on average more likely to tip, but I think that's only because they tend to work jobs where they rely on tips and associate with more people who rely on tips.

I think part of it is, I can somewhat identify with people from almost every class, so I tend to get along better I think with people across the spectrum. If you take an "us vs them" attitude you are going to encourage more of it. Marxists spend all day worrying about class warfare but I think it is really a terrible divisive way of thinking. Most wealthy people do not snub their noses at people that are less well off than them, but with the growing marxist sentiment it is no wonder that many of them begin to assume they will be prejudged by lower income class people. Don't prejudge people and I think you will find that people are more relateable.

We are not really divided by economic class in America, in my opinion, and Uber is really the example of that. At least in my place where there is no UberSelect and no UberPool, it is UberX for everyone. Whether you are wealthy or poor, unless you have your own personal driver, chances are you are booking an UberX. Where are we as Uber drivers incomewise? It is hard to say for certain because honestly you can make a lot of money doing this or you can be dirt poor depending on your market, your luck, and your motivation to spend extremely long hours driving.

Some of the really wealthy business owners, while I don't share their success, I have tried a few times at running businesses even though none really took off, so I am at least familiar with their entrepreneurial spirit and drive.

One thing I have noticed, is that sharing my education with passengers seems to be a better or worse idea depending on the class of the passenger. If a passenger tells me they are a nurse, lawyer, engineer, or with even higher earnings, and it comes up, I might mention I have an MS in engineering. Assuming it comes up naturally I think it adds to bonding.

On the other hand, when I have passengers that are store clerks, baristas, casino workers, and they ask me about where I went to school I only mention my high school because I think bringing up that I went to college causes resentment... even though I haven't profited really from college. Really if I could have been working a job during the 6 years I spent in college, maybe I could afford a house by now.

And then I deal with drug runners, prostitutes, and other criminals and I think I'm not any better than them. Any time you do a cash ride, essentially you are legally falling into the same realm as them by making illegal profits. And if your area is like mine, you probably depend on the criminal underclass for your income as they are a sizeable percentage of your ridership.

This morning I went home early after spending a few hours sleeping in my car with the apps on to get 1 ride request 15 minutes away and make $10, then spending 2 more hours sitting in a normally busy spot and only getting one ride request... I drove to a McDonald's 10 minutes away, delivered McDondald's and made $5. In the parking lot near the entry to the McDonald's there was a homeless man cursing at the wind.

Today I made far less than minimum wage.... If every day was like today, I'd be worse off than a minimum wage job... but yet the other night, I made a tad over $350 before Uber locked me out for reaching the 16 hour limit. If every day was like that day I'd be making more than the engineers. And if it weren't for the gig economy, (and I had no supportive family to fall back on) I could easily see myself being that homeless guy that no one loves, standing besides his grocery cart cursing at the wind.

So what class do I belong to? Thanks in no small part to the gig economy, I can't tell you which class I belong to. And maybe I like it best that way. There are good people in every class and I wouldn't want to isolate myself from those good people by trying to put myself in a box.
 

OldBay

Well-Known Member
I've actually found many of the wealthy pax to be very friendly and down to earth. To be honest, I don't find that income level is a good predictor of passenger behavior... although lower middle class seems on average more likely to tip, but I think that's only because they tend to work jobs where they rely on tips and associate with more people who rely on tips.

I think part of it is, I can somewhat identify with people from almost every class, so I tend to get along better I think with people across the spectrum. If you take an "us vs them" attitude you are going to encourage more of it. Marxists spend all day worrying about class warfare but I think it is really a terrible divisive way of thinking. Most wealthy people do not snub their noses at people that are less well off than them, but with the growing marxist sentiment it is no wonder that many of them begin to assume they will be prejudged by lower income class people. Don't prejudge people and I think you will find that people are more relateable.

We are not really divided by economic class in America, in my opinion, and Uber is really the example of that. At least in my place where there is no UberSelect and no UberPool, it is UberX for everyone. Whether you are wealthy or poor, unless you have your own personal driver, chances are you are booking an UberX. Where are we as Uber drivers incomewise? It is hard to say for certain because honestly you can make a lot of money doing this or you can be dirt poor depending on your market, your luck, and your motivation to spend extremely long hours driving.

Some of the really wealthy business owners, while I don't share their success, I have tried a few times at running businesses even though none really took off, so I am at least familiar with their entrepreneurial spirit and drive.

One thing I have noticed, is that sharing my education with passengers seems to be a better or worse idea depending on the class of the passenger. If a passenger tells me they are a nurse, lawyer, engineer, or with even higher earnings, and it comes up, I might mention I have an MS in engineering. Assuming it comes up naturally I think it adds to bonding.

On the other hand, when I have passengers that are store clerks, baristas, casino workers, and they ask me about where I went to school I only mention my high school because I think bringing up that I went to college causes resentment... even though I haven't profited really from college. Really if I could have been working a job during the 6 years I spent in college, maybe I could afford a house by now.

And then I deal with drug runners, prostitutes, and other criminals and I think I'm not any better than them. Any time you do a cash ride, essentially you are legally falling into the same realm as them by making illegal profits. And if your area is like mine, you probably depend on the criminal underclass for your income as they are a sizeable percentage of your ridership.

This morning I went home early after spending a few hours sleeping in my car with the apps on to get 1 ride request 15 minutes away and make $10, then spending 2 more hours sitting in a normally busy spot and only getting one ride request... I drove to a McDonald's 10 minutes away, delivered McDondald's and made $5. In the parking lot near the entry to the McDonald's there was a homeless man cursing at the wind.

Today I made far less than minimum wage.... If every day was like today, I'd be worse off than a minimum wage job... but yet the other night, I made a tad over $350 before Uber locked me out for reaching the 16 hour limit. If every day was like that day I'd be making more than the engineers. And if it weren't for the gig economy, (and I had no supportive family to fall back on) I could easily see myself being that homeless guy that no one loves, standing besides his grocery cart cursing at the wind.

So what class do I belong to? Thanks in no small part to the gig economy, I can't tell you which class I belong to. And maybe I like it best that way. There are good people in every class and I wouldn't want to isolate myself from those good people by trying to put myself in a box.
I liked your post but am left wondering why someone with a masters in engineering would say that the degree did not benefit them in their career. Did you have another career path and are now semi-retired?

With prior engineering experience you could certainly be doing it again without too much effort, and the pay would be 2-10x what you are making with Uber.

BTW, I get alot of wealthy businessmen who brag about their accomplishments and wealth. I figure they are just practicing their spiel with someone they will never see again.
 

oldfart

Well-Known Member
If they are wealthy and they take UberX, chances are they won't tip. Anyone with self respect would have requested black or SUV.
My issue is that they're almost always on the phone the duration of the trip, can't really do anything but provide them with a safe and comfortable ride from A to B. Greet them warmly like any other pax.

It's almost like they feel dirty taking UberX, no idea why they do. Might not have a lot of Black cars in my market but there are lots of car services.

We don’t have black or suv here but I get a lot of XL calls for just one or two people
 
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Trafficat

Well-Known Member
[B said:
OldBay[/B]]
I liked your post but am left wondering why someone with a masters in engineering would say that the degree did not benefit them in their career. Did you have another career path and are now semi-retired?

With prior engineering experience you could certainly be doing it again without too much effort, and the pay would be 2-10x what you are making with Uber.

BTW, I get alot of wealthy businessmen who brag about their accomplishments and wealth. I figure they are just practicing their spiel with someone they will never see again.

I suppose you could say I am on an alternate career path, but not, (initially anyway), by choice.

An engineering degree is necessary but not sufficient to starting a career in engineering. I've never been an engineer. If I had prior engineering experience, I could maybe do it again without too much effort, but I don't. Almost every position requires experience and for the rare ones that don't a person who graduated years ago with nothing much to show for it is a less attractive candidate than a person who graduated this year.

I never did an internship while in college, passing one up in order to graduate early, which was quite possibly a fatal career decision. I've applied at a lot of places, and done a lot of interviews but to no avail. In addition to that blunder, my social skills are so far below par, even by engineer standards, that I think it is a major barrier to me getting a job (or enjoying one if I do get one.)

I don't think my story is as rare as it would seem. Everyone says there is a STEM shortage, but the fact of the matter is, less than half of people with STEM degrees get STEM jobs. Companies report a shortage of engineers, but they don't have a shortage of people fresh out of college with a degree... they have a shortage of say, engineers with 5-10 years of experience designing refrigerant units for aircraft... and they know a guy from Asia who has that exact experience but they can't get the VISA to hire him without first posting a job for locals and proving to the government that there are no qualified local applicants.

After years of trying to get an engineering job, I figured what it really took to get an engineering job was to know someone on the inside... so I worked as a machine technician wrench turner for a while as an employee for a subcontractor at a place that hired engineers, but half of my coworkers only had GEDs so I don't really attribute my degree for that one. The subcontractor company was hiring anyone with a pulse and having a hard time keeping them. I made friends, or at least friendly acquaintance, with some engineers at the company. After I left being a mechanic, some of the engineers I had made friends with told me about an opening, so I applied... but yet, I interviewed for it and I was rejected. They probably had others also apply who had real experience rather than merely having connections... and it didn't help that my coworkers still worked there as subcontractors and might not have had nice things to say about me. I refused to be engaged with their constant games of trying to get a supervisor fired so the favorite guy in the click could get promoted in his place. (They did succeed, but with no help from me).

I pretty much gave up even applying any more. Maybe some day I'll get an engineering job, but it seems like a waste of time to even apply unless I've got someone I know on the inside promising me a job, and even that didn't work out for me last time. My current strategy for life is just to do rideshare mainly and work on building my other side businesses which may eventually become so profitable that my time is better spent focusing on those.

If I could be an engineer at a major company now, I'd try it, but regrettably I doubt I would enjoy it and might not stick around long anyway. I'd be paid 2-10x as much as I'm being paid now, but I'm not really in need of much money, and I have a feeling it would just devolve into the same BS as always. Practically every day I've worked a "job" in my life, I've dreaded that alarm going off and dreaded going to work... not because of the working part, not because of the customers, but because of the coworkers, management, politics, and games. I do not dread driving for Uber. I go home and get bored so I go out driving.

I think I'm simply not cut out to work for a company as an employee. People say there is no advancement as an Uber driver, but at least for me there was no advancement in any job I've ever worked. I could work for 3 years at the same company, have top scores on performance tests, and they will hire some new guy from the outside or promote someone's friend on the inside despite them having a poor attendance and performance record.
 
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