Ready to Drive - But...

ChiChilly

Active Member
I'm all set to drive, therefore it feels ridiculous to have all this hesitation. I have my CDL, I've driven a coach bus in the city and throughout, and love to drive. I guess there are just things that bother me. As once a professional driver, the company always had their drivers backs. As an independent driver like this, it just doesn't seem like Uber has drivers backs from all the things I've read- I could be wrong and haven't even driven officially yet. The rating system bothers me because it is basically a he says/she says thing without proof and totally a subjective process of bias. Just got a great car and knowing that their insurance policy coverage is a $1000 deductible ... well I've never been in an accident and that seems way too much for a part time driver to cover. And then not knowing the destination...
 
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shiftydrake

Well-Known Member
Why would you even consider driving in Chicago area?..oh yeah I forgot to make that "life changing money".......well please think more than once about it....or ask other drivers before you sell your soul to Uber
 

SEAL Team 5

Well-Known Member
I have my CDL, As once a professional driver, the company always had their drivers backs. As an independent driver like this, it just doesn't seem like Uber has drivers backs from all the things I've read
Very good insight ChiChilly. As a fellow professional I'm sure you know the importance of compliance when it comes to commercial driving. Uber themselves is ignorant to all operating requirements per each jurisdiction. Uber states it's legal and for any driving partner to just download the app and start making money. As a CDL Operator you know there's a very big difference between personal and commercial driving. Just make sure that your insurance company knows that your driving for hire. Good luck.
 

ChiChilly

Active Member
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  • #5
Thanks Seal Team! Good to meet you. Driving with Uber poses some challenges as people expect a fast track mentality (just get me there fast and the cheapest way possible). When dealing with the hiring clientele, they understand what they are hiring you for. It's interesting, especially with the type of rating system in place.

Regarding the insurance, when I spoke to them they said that if one is driving over 40-50% of the time then it is considered mandatory to change over the insurance. I'm only part time.

Another compliance issue that I'm sure will creep up is the 8-10 rule (drive eights hours but can be out ten hours total). Im curious to see how that plays out in the future.
 

Another Uber Driver

Well-Known Member
Moderator
Another compliance issue that I'm sure will creep up is the 8-10 rule (drive eights hours but can be out ten hours total). Im curious to see how that plays out in the future.
I am not familiar with Illinois law, but the law here treats a vehicle-for-hire differently from how it treats a commercial vehicle. The Eight/Ten rule does not apply to a vehicle-for-hire in The District of Columbia, The State of Maryland or the Commonwealth of Virginia. In those jurisdictions, the driver of a vehicle-for-hire is under the same duration rules as is a driver of a private vehicle:

District of Columbia: Twelve hours
Commonwealth of Virginia: Thirteen hours
State of Maryland: Thirteen hours.

In the District of Columbia, the restriction applies to any twenty four hour period. It allows for an exemption if there is an "unbroken period of eight hours rest"; e.g., you can drive from Midnight to Noon, "rest" until Eight P.M., then drive until Midnight. While that is sixteen hours, because of the eight hour "rest period", it is legal.

The Commonwealth of Virginia is less specific, It states thriteen hours in a day. You can break up the thirteen hours. You can driver Midnight to Three A.M., go home until Seven A.M.' drive from Seven A.M. until Eleven A.M., go home until Four P.M., drive from Four P.M. until Ten P.M. then go home until Midnight.

Maryland is simply thirteen hours in a day.

Those are the local laws. Illinois law may be different. Federal law tends to shy from governing taxicabs and other vehicles for hire, with the exception of prohibiting discrimination against Federally protected classes.
 

ChiChilly

Active Member
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  • #7
AnotherUberDriver...Wow what a great, detailed response, thank you. Since I have passenger endorsement on commercial license it was ten hours drive time, up to a total fifteen hours out (drive time and non drive time included) and eight hours off for commercial passenger regulations. I'm glad they don't apply to this. And I just checked, for curiosities sake, that the two periods from 1am to 5am home terminal time rule was suspended for now (a regulations tidbit) :smiles:
 
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