Province looking at raising speed limit on 400 series highways (update)

RideshareDog

Well-Known Member
The Ford government is looking at ways to get people moving quicker across the province and they’ve got their eyes on your speedometer.
Ontario Transportation Minister Jeff Yurek announced on Wednesday that the province is planning to review speed limits on the 400 series highways.
“If you look back on the history of why speed limits were set where they were, back in the ’70’s there was an energy crisis and in order to conserve fuel they lowered the speed limits on our highway system and it stayed that way ever since,” he explained.
“I’ve heard lots of stakeholders mention that maybe it’s time to take a review of how our speed limits are in the province, and I’ll have more to say on this next week on this issue, but we’re moving forward with consultations and the pilot project to see if it’s time to move forward.”

Yurek wouldn’t get into specifics on just how high the province is considering raising the speed limits too but said more details on the province-wide consultation and pilot project will be released soon.

This is all part of new legislation that will be introduced at Queen’s Park on Thursday called Getting Ontario Moving.
The new legislation will also see tougher fines for people who drive too slowly in the passing lane, as well as speeders in construction zones or near tow trucks.
A province-wide consultation will also be conducted on the rules of the road for bicycles, e-bikes and e-scooters.
Story by 680 NEWS

OH JOY (Sarcasm)

man they have some of the dumbest explanations for their policies
 

Skorpio

Well-Known Member
Its 100km/h now..
And ppl drive 120-140 at anytime.

If they increase limit.. lets say 120 max..
Ppl will go 140-160..
This will never happens.
 
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Skorpio

Well-Known Member
Raise to 120 so people can drive 140-150...traffic will move faster!


If people drive 140-150..
#$$#% OPP need a lamborghini

 

i_k

Well-Known Member
I would’ve loved this last year. Now I drive long distances for my day job and driving 100-110 rather than 120–130 saves me about $5 of gas a day. I like UC’s idea of 120 on the express and 100 on collectors. That gives us a choice to save some fuel costs if we can. Or have something like 100 in the right lane, 110 in middle lanes and 120 in the fast lane, but that might get confusing to some people. It’s not the 70s energy crisis they speak of but with the price of fuel so high slowing down pays..
 

dmoney155

Well-Known Member
I would’ve loved this last year. Now I drive long distances for my day job and driving 100-110 rather than 120–130 saves me about $5 of gas a day. I like UC’s idea of 120 on the express and 100 on collectors. That gives us a choice to save some fuel costs if we can. Or have something like 100 in the right lane, 110 in middle lanes and 120 in the fast lane, but that might get confusing to some people. It’s not the 70s energy crisis they speak of but with the price of fuel so high slowing down pays..
This is exactly why I don't speed. They don't need signs and regulation to control speed limits. Simply make it not efficient to do so for mere mortals.
 
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Yam Digger

Well-Known Member
The 400 series highways were originally designed for cars to drive at 75 mph. Then in the 70’s it was lowered to 60 mph; not for safety reasons, but to save fuel.

Now that cars have gearboxes with higher Overdrive ratios, fuel consumption at highway speeds is not the the issue it used to be.
 

Athos

Well-Known Member
What might be the unintended consequences?

I would think people would increase their speed on all roads, right across the board. It would be fine for people practiced in video games but for others, especially older drivers, there would be some who would be scared off the road. Learning drivers, too would be challenged. Driver stress would go up. Hospitalizations and deaths would increase, insurance rates would go up. Emissions would increase and electric cars wouldn't have the range at higher speeds hurting their implementation.

Ford has one of those simple minds that thinks that all people are, or should be like him- that he is an ideal sample of a human being and that his ideas and skills are, or should be universal. He lacks imagination. He doesn`t think he needs evidence, like Trump he thinks he "just knows" and eggheads like scientists and engineers are wasteful red tape.

I wonder if higher speed limits would really speed things up. On a long haul like a run to Montreal it would probably help but in Toronto how much time would you save with all that acceleration, braking and the accidents. If Ford really wanted to reduce travel times he should be looking at computerizing the traffic lights to integrate them. Longer greens when needed, intelligent advanced greens, planned gaps for side street access and other things. To get somewhere quickly it's best not to have the highest top speed but the highest average speed.
 

MUGATS

Well-Known Member
I can agree that outside of major metro areas, this might be ok. Heavy traffic areas? Good Luck.
 

racer26

Well-Known Member
Its 100km/h now..
And ppl drive 120-140 at anytime.

If they increase limit.. lets say 120 max..
Ppl will go 140-160..
This will never happens.

The science says you're wrong.

People do not just always go SL+20-40km/h, but rather they go as fast as they are comfortable in the conditions.

85% of drivers drive at a relatively equal safe speed for the road conditions always. If you set the speed limit at this speed, you maximize road safety (but minimize ticket revenues). The majority of the 400-series was built with 200km/h+ design speeds (meaning, the road can be safely navigated at over 200km/h, ignoring traffic), and so the primary limiter of speed is and should be traffic and weather conditions.

Numerous other jurisdictions have raised their speed limits on similar roads and found *no statistically significant change* in average speed, but they *do* find *increases* in average safety, because more of the law-abiding sticklers are moving at the average speed. Going faster is not inherently more dangerous - 100km/h is plenty fast enough that coming to an abrupt stop is just as fatal as an abrupt stop from 120 or 140km/h. Roadways where vehicles *relative* speed differential is large are *much* more dangerous. Consider how a car in the left lane doing 100km/h because "i'm already going the speed limit" impacts traffic around it - faster traffic weaves, passes it on the right, and dramatically increases the risk to public safety. Consider also what happens when a police vehicle is on the 400-series. Much faster approaching traffic from behind comes up on a clump of traffic that is being very careful around the cop to not get a ticket. These situations are not helpful to road safety.

Ontario has some of the safest roads on Earth. The Liberal-era MTO wanted you to believe thats because of our 100km/h speed limits. It isn't. It's because our licensing system is actually pretty good (though not quite as good as Europe's), our road maintenance is quite good (because frost heave means it *has* to be), our vehicle safety standards are some of the most stringent, and our roads incorporate many safety features in their design. Increasing speed limit to 120-130km/h on the 400-series would not make drivers go faster. It would legalize what many of us do every day, it would make us all safer, and it would reduce ticket revenues. Its also what a very strong majority of Ontario motorists want - 70-85% of drivers say they want higher limits on the 400 series.
 

i_k

Well-Known Member
I wonder if higher speed limits would really speed things up. On a long haul like a run to Montreal it would probably help but in Toronto how much time would you save with all that acceleration, braking and the accidents.

I often drive to London from North York when there’s no traffic and I notice the difference between going 120km/h and 100km/h is about 10 minutes. That’s a 200 km drive. The majority of drivers would save only a couple minutes getting around the GTA, and that’s when there’s no traffic. Like @MUGATS said, during rush hour it will still be at a standstill like usual. The more I think about an increased speed limit the more it sounds like a bad idea..
 

dmoney155

Well-Known Member
I often drive to London from North York when there’s no traffic and I notice the difference between going 120km/h and 100km/h is about 10 minutes. That’s a 200 km drive. The majority of drivers would save only a couple minutes getting around the GTA, and that’s when there’s no traffic. Like @MUGATS said, during rush hour it will still be at a standstill like usual. The more I think about an increased speed limit the more it sounds like a bad idea..
Yeah, you only see its effects when you are doing 140ish between Toronto and Windsor. Road needs to be clear for that, you need car that can stick to the road well, and the drawback is fuel consumption is much higher (~30% more), so on a 400km a gain 68mins... so you gotta ask yourself if it's worth it.
 
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