Procedure for ejecting a pax?

IERide

Well-Known Member
I'm new - havn't even done my first ride yet, and I'm unclear on the steps for ejecting a passenger before reaching the destination - and what happens if they refuse to get out?
Is there a list of what Uber (or Lyft) have decided are valid reasons for ejecting someone?
Also, do I not get paid for the miles completed?
 

SEAL Team 5

Well-Known Member
I'm new - havn't even done my first ride yet, and I'm unclear on the steps for ejecting a passenger before reaching the destination - and what happens if they refuse to get out?
Is there a list of what Uber (or Lyft) have decided are valid reasons for ejecting someone?
Also, do I not get paid for the miles completed?
Do you want to know Uber's politically correct way to eject a pax or the way it should be done. Definitely depends on the circumstances. Usually just go to safe place, tell pax that you're ending the fare and they have to go. There's sometimes it can become a bit ugly in which you must call the police or get physical with the pax. The more you drive the more scenarios you will become aware of. There's a few threads on the forum about this very issue. Just search keywords for ejecting passenger.
 

IERide

Well-Known Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #4
I guess the question is more of:
1) Is there a pre-defined list of valid reasons for ejection, or can I just decide based on passenger stupidity, stinkyness, messyness, being a jerk, whatever, that I no longer want them in my car?
2) What do you do when the "toss" part doesn't work? Get out, call the police, and watch as they destroy your car, etc?
 

SEAL Team 5

Well-Known Member
2) What do you do when the "toss" part doesn't work? Get out, call the police, and watch as they destroy your car, etc?
This is where that commercial on TV about becoming an Uber driver doesn't show you the reality of driving fare for hire. If you're a passive person then this profession will definitely put you in harm's way. Sometimes we have to become a little physical with the drunks we deal with. You sort of become a "bouncer on wheels".
 

Squirming Like A Toad

Well-Known Member
The best way to do it is to not let it happen. I've yet to have a fare where it was not the best choice to just proceed to their destination.

"Bouncer on wheels" is not what you really want to be, given how much of a bar's incidents and liability have something to do with the bouncer. There is nothing about driving Uber that is worth that. The owner of a successful nightclub with bouncers can make a million in a few years. Guess who can't- a driver.

Most important thing to remember when you have a troublesome passenger is do not escalate! If he insults you, do not return the insult. Abusive and rude behavior is not a good reason to take a risk of a confrontation which could include either you being assaulted while you are driving, or you grappling with a passenger on the side of a road.
 

grayspinner

Well-Known Member
First, you reduce the risk of problem people in your car:

- keep your doors locked & watch for potential problems. Just cancel on people who are too drunk or aggressive or overloading your car or anything else that sends up a red flag.

- Distract people from problems/conflicts by taking control of the conversation and keeping the conversation light hearted.

- De-escalate situations. This is a skill that can be learned - check out some books on conflict resolution and non-violent communication.

If these things don't work & you choose to end the ride, just pull over & say 'I'm ending this trip, you need to get out'. Be assertive & confident - but there is no need to be rude or argue with them. If they refuse to get out, call 911. If you are worried about your safety, exit the car with your phone and keys as you are talking to 911. If they follow you out of the car, then you can get back in quickly & lock the doors (or at least lock the doors with the remote as soon as they exit the car)

Avoid physical contact with the pax.
 

Coachman

Well-Known Member
I'm new - havn't even done my first ride yet, and I'm unclear on the steps for ejecting a passenger before reaching the destination...
You haven't done your first ride yet so there's a hundred things you ought to be thinking about other than the procedure for ejecting a passenger. I've done 800 rides and never ejected anybody. Looking back, there's probably one group that I would eject if I had to do over again. You've got much more important things to worry about, believe me.
 

Kmiles

Well-Known Member
You'll develop a tolerance for idiots doing this. But if you're to the point where you can't take it, end the trip immediately. Once you make the decision stick to it. It's rate but I just completed 3400 rides and I've only ejected 2 pax who's level of stupidity pushed me.

With one pax, I was actually at the destination, which was a large shopping center. I simply asked the pax which business he was going to since every business in the shopping center shared the address. Pax responded with, "didn’t I give you the address." I stopped the car and told him to GTFO, NOW!

The other pax I ejected thought it was cute to blast my radio, open my sunroof and Snapchat with her friends. I pulled over and told them to get out. They tried the valley girl routine but I was done. It was a good airport pickup but wasn't worth the risk.

But it's simple... Stop, end trip and tell the pax to GTFO! Don't respond to their questions. At that point they're probably recording you and will bait you into saying something / doing negative.

People in groups could be tricky since you'll always have one agitator in the group.
 
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Jimmy Bernat

Well-Known Member
Like others have said just avoid getting a bad passenger . When I first started I got a verbal abusive pax , I gave him one warning about how he was talking when he continued I pulled over and said he could get out on his own or I could remove him myself and he just got out of the car and left . I had another pax cancel the ride about a mile after I picked him up I saw it cancelled I pulled over right away and told him okay you cancelled the ride this is where the ride ends . No problem

How to avoid a bad pax from the get go, if you get go is
1) Don't accept PAX rated below 4.5
2) If you arrive and the PAX looks to be over intoxicated , or you get a bad vibe just cancel and drive off
3) Anytime a PAX calls me or I have to call a PAX and they give me even slight attitude I don't pick them up
4) If you go to a location and the PAX isn't there , and they contact you to tell you they are somewhere else, wait 5 minutes , cancel collect NO SHOW FEE and move on
5) If you canacel on someone and then get the request again don't accept it
6) If a PAX ever texts me anything along the lines of Are you coming ? how long till you're hear? I cancel

The way I look at it is if before the ride starts there is any attitude or even a slight hint of a problem I just avoid the situation, it's just not worth it . Plus the worst thing a PAX can do to you is file a complaint saying you were intoxicated , it's an instant deativation and you have little to no shot of being reactivated so just avoid the jerks at all costs.
 

DrFrasierCrane

New Member
Like the others said, ejecting pax is the least of your concerns right now.

But here's another option: go to a police station or an area frequented by cops. I have made sure to know where the cop shops are in my own and the surrounding cities. I also know the donut shops (I'm not kidding here) that they frequent at night waiting for calls. If you have a belligerent pax, just take them there. When I first started driving, I stopped for coffee one night and it happened to be the very place that many of the EMS and cops hung out. I walked in and there were, no joke, 8 cops including a swat team officer, in there drinking coffee. I was in the safest place in the city at that moment (which might differ for you depending on your opinion of the police). Trust me though, once they see you're at a police station, they'll straighten up.
 

I_Like_Spam

Well-Known Member
I'm new - havn't even done my first ride yet, and I'm unclear on the steps for ejecting a passenger before reaching the destination - and what happens if they refuse to get out?
Is there a list of what Uber (or Lyft) have decided are valid reasons for ejecting someone?
Also, do I not get paid for the miles completed?
The best way is to keep your doors locked until you see what the people look like and whether you'd object to driving them. If someone is too drunk to ride, they don't get in your car to start with.

As far as getting rid of undesirable types that are actually in your car and refuse to leave, I'll relate the lesson I had with Lou when I was trained as a YC driver. Bending their finger back will cause him enough pain, he'll leave immediately. Lou described how he got rid of a bum in front of the Edison in Pittsburgh in a hurry, and Lou was only like 5-3.
 

Frontier Guy

Well-Known Member
G.T.F.O. or else, simple, direct and to the point.........Oh, and make sure to file a HELP notice with Uber/Lyft regarding pax, and rate them 1 stars
 

abe54321

Member
The other pax I ejected thought it was cute to blast my radio, open my sunroof and Snapchat with her friends. I pulled over and told them to get out. They tried the valley girl routine but I was done. It was a good airport pickup but wasn't worth the risk.

You kicked them out just for blasting your radio? You are my hero.

I kick people out if they start saying I'm taking them for the long drive or even insinuate that I'm ripping them off. It feels good, too. I've lost 50$ fares like that though. Probably should've just bit my lip on that one.
 

Dback2004

Well-Known Member
I've only ever kicked someone out once, and they were more than happy to get out at that point (a drunk couple arguing and physically fighting in my car).

I agree with most of the advice on here... don't escalate, take the insults and don't argue back, try to keep things calm. I don't think there's an official list of reasons to kick someone out, but you're an independent contractor so it should be your call. I'm pretty tolerant of most drunken crap pax pull, you have to be to survive this gig. However, once you make the decision to kick someone out be firm in your stance. Pull over in a well-lit, well-populated area and say you're ending the ride, they need to get out. Don't swear, don't explain, don't argue - you're probably being recorded and will be on YouTube tomorrow morning. Stay professional and repeat you're ending the ride, please get out. If they don't, take your phone and keys and exit the vehicle while calling 911. Never use physical force to eject a passenger, leave that up to the cops. Last thing you want is to get sued for bodily injury yanking a drunk idiot by the arm out of your car. Also, having a 2-way dash cam will help if the rider complains to Uber (or a good YouTube response video :biggrin:)
 

Squirming Like A Toad

Well-Known Member
The other pax I ejected thought it was cute to blast my radio, open my sunroof and Snapchat with her friends. I pulled over and told them to get out. They tried the valley girl routine but I was done. It was a good airport pickup but wasn't worth the risk.

You kicked them out just for blasting your radio? You are my hero.

I kick people out if they start saying I'm taking them for the long drive or even insinuate that I'm ripping them off. It feels good, too. I've lost 50$ fares like that though. Probably should've just bit my lip on that one.
To properly understand this you have to do a little psychological analysis. Specifically: on yourself.

It's a common theme among service employees to overreact to slights, or even things that aren't exactly slights, because doing a service job makes them feel inferior and then they do things to make themselves feel dominant. This is observed all the time, from waitresses intentionally screwing up your order to TSA agents physically degrading an attractive and confident woman with a first class ticket. Abandoning a person on the road who has trusted you to get them to their destination because they opened a sunroof, a device that is designed to be opened, is another example of that.

Maybe I'm just a weirdo, but it makes me feel like a much more spiritually and emotionally developed person, an advanced rather than a degraded man, to understand that this rude or difficult person in my van is a hurting person who has not received the blessings I have. Then I try to show them the right example and stoically take them to their destination, with a sincere farewell and thanks as they exit. I'm not going to be like the nasty waitress, much better to bring those around you up to your level than to descend to anyone else's.
 
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