Police cite woman for going on leisurely drive during Pennsylvania stay-at-home order

Another Uber Driver

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Police cite woman for going on leisurely drive during Pennsylvania stay-at-home order
Teresa Boeckel, York Daily Record
USA TODAYApril 3, 2020, 5:00 PM EDT

Police cite woman for going on leisurely drive during Pennsylvania stay-at-home order

Police cite woman for going on leisurely drive during Pennsylvania stay-at-home order
YORK, Pa. – Pennsylvania State Police cited 19-year-old Anita Lynn Shaffer for violating a stay-at-home for York County after police say she went a leisurely drive on March 29.
Shaffer is the only person in the Commonwealth to be cited under the state's disease control and prevention act of 1955, spokesman Ryan Tarkowski said on Friday. Troopers have issued two warnings in other areas of the state.
A leisurely drive is not essential travel, Tarkowski said.
State police initially pulled over Shaffer for a vehicle code violation, Tarkowski said. He declined to give more details, saying it would be inappropriate, but "the trooper’s decision was based on the totality of the circumstances."
"Our focus is on voluntary compliance through education. If we can get someone to do the right thing through a conversation, that is best," he wrote.
Shaffer could not be reached for comment.
The citation will cost Shaffer more than $200.
Pennsylvania governor Tom Wolf expanded the stay-at home order on April 1 to include the entire state to help stop the spread of the novel coronavirus.
Among the reasons that travel is allowed, according to the state:
  • Tasks essential to maintain health and safety, or the health and safety of their family or household members (including pets), such as obtaining medicine or medical supplies, visiting a health care professional, or obtaining supplies they need to work from home
  • Getting necessary services or supplies for themselves, for their family or household members, or as part of volunteer efforts, or to deliver those services or supplies to others to maintain the safety, sanitation, and essential operation of residences
  • Engaging in outdoor activity, such as walking, hiking or running if they maintain social distancing
  • To perform work providing essential products and services at a life-sustaining business
Does that mean that everyone who goes for a drive will be cited or warned? No, Tarkowski said. Troopers will make decisions to warn or cite drivers based on a case-by-case basis.
"But to reiterate, Stay at Home means stay at home," he said.
Follow Teresa Boeckel on Twitter: @teresaboeckel
This article originally appeared on York Daily Record: Coronavirus stay-at-home order: PA woman cited after going for a drive


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Invisible

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until there is martial law I'd think driving in your own car and not ever stopping or get out should be ok. Their gas, their dime.
Aren’t most states now kind of living under martial law? Sure states are using a softer tone like mine, safer at home, but we’re only allowed to go to essential places and exercise outside.

My friends in the northern part of my state said there are State Patrol officers by the county line up there, stopping cars and asking why they’re trying to enter the county. I’m still shocked on that one.
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I loved Eddie Rabbit as a kid. His song the First Step, or whatever the actual title is, is a great song. He died too young.
 

tohunt4me

Well-Known Member

U.S.
Police cite woman for going on leisurely drive during Pennsylvania stay-at-home order
Teresa Boeckel, York Daily Record
USA TODAYApril 3, 2020, 5:00 PM EDT

Police cite woman for going on leisurely drive during Pennsylvania stay-at-home order

Police cite woman for going on leisurely drive during Pennsylvania stay-at-home order
YORK, Pa. – Pennsylvania State Police cited 19-year-old Anita Lynn Shaffer for violating a stay-at-home for York County after police say she went a leisurely drive on March 29.
Shaffer is the only person in the Commonwealth to be cited under the state's disease control and prevention act of 1955, spokesman Ryan Tarkowski said on Friday. Troopers have issued two warnings in other areas of the state.
A leisurely drive is not essential travel, Tarkowski said.
State police initially pulled over Shaffer for a vehicle code violation, Tarkowski said. He declined to give more details, saying it would be inappropriate, but "the trooper’s decision was based on the totality of the circumstances."
"Our focus is on voluntary compliance through education. If we can get someone to do the right thing through a conversation, that is best," he wrote.
Shaffer could not be reached for comment.
The citation will cost Shaffer more than $200.
Pennsylvania governor Tom Wolf expanded the stay-at home order on April 1 to include the entire state to help stop the spread of the novel coronavirus.
Among the reasons that travel is allowed, according to the state:
  • Tasks essential to maintain health and safety, or the health and safety of their family or household members (including pets), such as obtaining medicine or medical supplies, visiting a health care professional, or obtaining supplies they need to work from home
  • Getting necessary services or supplies for themselves, for their family or household members, or as part of volunteer efforts, or to deliver those services or supplies to others to maintain the safety, sanitation, and essential operation of residences
  • Engaging in outdoor activity, such as walking, hiking or running if they maintain social distancing
  • To perform work providing essential products and services at a life-sustaining business
Does that mean that everyone who goes for a drive will be cited or warned? No, Tarkowski said. Troopers will make decisions to warn or cite drivers based on a case-by-case basis.
"But to reiterate, Stay at Home means stay at home," he said.
Follow Teresa Boeckel on Twitter: @teresaboeckel
This article originally appeared on York Daily Record: Coronavirus stay-at-home order: PA woman cited after going for a drive


The Week
The car is an extension of the home under Louisiana law.
She did not have a large group in the car ?
 

Another Uber Driver

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My friends in the northern part of my state said there are State Patrol officers by the county line up there, stopping cars and asking why they’re trying to enter the county.
I have read and heard that the enforcement actions vary. When Governor Hogan issued Maryland's Stay Home order, he specifically stated that the constabularies were not to do traffic stops and ask people why they were not at home. If, however, they were investigating a collision or doing a routine traffic stop for a violation or faulty equipment, they could ask and act accordingly. The impression that he gave was if they were not out for an allowed purpose, the officer should simply tell the driver to go home. If there are egregious violations, on the other hand, the police should act accordingly.

Neither Governor Northam of Virginia nor Mayor Bowser of the District of Columbia had too much to say about enforcement in those jurisdictions.
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The car is an extension of the home under Louisiana law.
You will do well to keep in mind that Louisiana Law is based on Napoleonic Code, unlike the other states where it is based on English Law. That might account for the difference; might.
 

Mkang14

Well-Known Member
Just driving to drive is not okay. Stay home. Snowflakes dont realize it can be much worse.

I had a zoom meeting with coworker on Thursday. Shes from Virginia and told me people are still out and about. Glad they are setting an example with this girl.

Monkey see, monkey do. If streets become flooded with people that want to drive for no reason then that will encourage others to do the same. "If others are doing it so can i" 🤨
 
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SHalester

Well-Known Member
How do we know that's the case
I was making my own case. If I decided to take a drive, wo a destination, no plan to stop...... We are not under martial law....yet.... SAH orders we are under only say no unnecessary travel; implied is a stop. If one drove in a big circle for 2 hours, that would be ok, I would think.

I haven't done it, but it certainly has crossed my mind........cabin fever is a very real thing.
 

mbd

Well-Known Member
That’s ridiculous! She was alone in her car, not near anyone. It’s much safer taking a leisurely drive than going into a grocery store.
It is a good ticket. What if everyone starts to leisurely drive :smiles: publicity alone will force people to stay inside for the next few days.
Leisurely driving, she will go and pump gas, hit McDonald’s and meet her friends in a apt.
what if 100 nineteen year olds do that ? Just like the spring breakers. 100 nineteen year olds, one of them will pass it on to her mom/dad/grandma.
19 year olds don’t do too much leisurely driving.
19 year old’s have two things in mind and one of them is not bible study :unsure:
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If it was a 40 year old , I will accept leisurely driving.
3 Massachusetts golfers arrested for violating Rhode Island coronavirus quarantine order: police
 
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Mkang14

Well-Known Member
I was making my own case. If I decided to take a drive, wo a destination, no plan to stop...... We are not under martial law....yet.... SAH orders we are under only say no unnecessary travel; implied is a stop. If one drove in a big circle for 2 hours, that would be ok, I would think.

I haven't done it, but it certainly has crossed my mind........cabin fever is a very real thing.
People can deal with cabin fever to keep the street clear. I dont want to see anyone. I understand it could be worse for people in smaller living spaces. But we can all deal.

I had someone tell me they are still going out to resturant because no one in their city is taking it serious and people are out and about. I think leaving the house like this will encourage others to do the same.
 

Invisible

Well-Known Member
I have read and heard that the enforcement actions vary. When Governor Hogan issued Maryland's Stay Home order, he specifically stated that the constabularies were not to do traffic stops and ask people why they were not at home. If, however, they were investigating a collision or doing a routine traffic stop for a violation or faulty equipment, they could ask and act accordingly. The impression that he gave was if they were not out for an allowed purpose, the officer should simply tell the driver to go home. If there are egregious violations, on the other hand, the police should act accordingly.

Neither Governor Northam of Virginia nor Mayor Bowser of the District of Columbia had too much to say about enforcement in those jurisdictions.
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You will do well to keep in mind that Louisiana Law is based on Napoleonic Code, unlike the other states where it is based on English Law. That might account for the difference; might.
I had planned on traveling weeks ago to the northern part of my state that’s rural where I had a place, owned by a family member, I could’ve stayed at alone. But I didn’t leave early enough because I had to shop for people down here and do errands for them.

My friends up there, who I wouldn’t have seen, said they didn’t want people traveling to their vacation homes, because our county down here has so many cases. I also read several articles from rural towns stating the same thing. I get why they don’t want people traveling long distances. Yet I was going to be alone in a tiny little cottage in the woods.

Yet friends up there are sending me pictures of them kayaking on the lake, putting their piers in the lake. And once all the ice melts, they’ll be boating. While our bars/restaurants were closed for St. P’s day here, they were all at the bars then.

The woman in PA probably just wanted a mental break by taking a long car drive, I think it’s reasonable for her to want to do that. Driving in a personal vehicle alone isn’t putting anyone at risk.
 
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SHalester

Well-Known Member
leaving the house like this will encourage others to do the same
but the SAH you are under, which is the same I'm under since the counties coordinated it doesn't state you can't leave the house. In fact, it says you can for exercise, hiking, biking, running etc. Just the whole 6ft distance for non-household members.

I suppose if and when we are under martial law and there are road blocks, that will be a different story, Until then a mere drive with no stops won't trigger any enforcement in the Bay Area counties. For now, I'm ok with my 5 mile stroll in the early AM to combat being stuck inside fever.
 

Crosbyandstarsky

Well-Known Member

U.S.
Police cite woman for going on leisurely drive during Pennsylvania stay-at-home order
Teresa Boeckel, York Daily Record
USA TODAYApril 3, 2020, 5:00 PM EDT

Police cite woman for going on leisurely drive during Pennsylvania stay-at-home order

Police cite woman for going on leisurely drive during Pennsylvania stay-at-home order
YORK, Pa. – Pennsylvania State Police cited 19-year-old Anita Lynn Shaffer for violating a stay-at-home for York County after police say she went a leisurely drive on March 29.
Shaffer is the only person in the Commonwealth to be cited under the state's disease control and prevention act of 1955, spokesman Ryan Tarkowski said on Friday. Troopers have issued two warnings in other areas of the state.
A leisurely drive is not essential travel, Tarkowski said.
State police initially pulled over Shaffer for a vehicle code violation, Tarkowski said. He declined to give more details, saying it would be inappropriate, but "the trooper’s decision was based on the totality of the circumstances."
"Our focus is on voluntary compliance through education. If we can get someone to do the right thing through a conversation, that is best," he wrote.
Shaffer could not be reached for comment.
The citation will cost Shaffer more than $200.
Pennsylvania governor Tom Wolf expanded the stay-at home order on April 1 to include the entire state to help stop the spread of the novel coronavirus.
Among the reasons that travel is allowed, according to the state:
  • Tasks essential to maintain health and safety, or the health and safety of their family or household members (including pets), such as obtaining medicine or medical supplies, visiting a health care professional, or obtaining supplies they need to work from home
  • Getting necessary services or supplies for themselves, for their family or household members, or as part of volunteer efforts, or to deliver those services or supplies to others to maintain the safety, sanitation, and essential operation of residences
  • Engaging in outdoor activity, such as walking, hiking or running if they maintain social distancing
  • To perform work providing essential products and services at a life-sustaining business
Does that mean that everyone who goes for a drive will be cited or warned? No, Tarkowski said. Troopers will make decisions to warn or cite drivers based on a case-by-case basis.
"But to reiterate, Stay at Home means stay at home," he said.
Follow Teresa Boeckel on Twitter: @teresaboeckel
This article originally appeared on York Daily Record: Coronavirus stay-at-home order: PA woman cited after going for a drive


The Week
I don’t believe it. They want you to get out alone and walk or drive. They even told us we can ride motorcycles. The suicide rate from people getting depressed is at least as much as the deaths from the virus so they want you to do something. Parks remain open. I think this is false
 

waldowainthrop

Well-Known Member
I think this is a failure of discretion. The old law is probably written broadly to add it as an additional charge or citation against someone who “deserves” public reprimand or consequence for acting recklessly, and this probably isn’t one of those cases.

The police (and prosecutors in other cases) always have an opportunity to exercise discretion and this was probably a case where they should have held back.
 

Invisible

Well-Known Member
People can deal with cabin fever to keep the street clear. I dont want to see anyone. I understand it could be worse for people in smaller living spaces. But we can all deal.

I had someone tell me they are still going out to resturant because no one in their city is taking it serious and people are out and about. I think leaving the house like this will encourage others to do the same.
I’ve pretty much stayed at home, except when I had to shop or do errands for people who aren’t leaving their homes because they’re higher risk.

News here said they closed some of the beaches on the northeast side of town, probably because too many were congregating now that’s it’s warmer here.

I’ve stayed away from Lake MI and the beaches because I don’t want to be around people. But I’m still walking in parks a few times a week where no one is near me because here we only have so many warm months. I love to be around nature, I need it for my sanity, and I don’t want to get fat. I also don’t have a yard of my own.
 

Mkang14

Well-Known Member
but the SAH you are under, which is the same I'm under since the counties coordinated it doesn't state you can't leave the house. In fact, it says you can for exercise, hiking, biking, running etc. Just the whole 6ft distance for non-household members.

I suppose if and when we are under martial law and there are road blocks, that will be a different story, Until then a mere drive with no stops won't trigger any enforcement in the Bay Area counties. For now, I'm ok with my 5 mile stroll in the early AM to combat being stuck inside fever.
I wouldnt mind enforcing stricter rules. What I want and what is being allowed is different then I guess.

I still walk every morning and don't see any other humans. But my city is also completely dead. Small city. Our county has 51 cases.
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I’ve pretty much stayed at home, except when I had to shop or do errands for people who aren’t leaving their homes because they’re higher risk.

News here said they closed some of the beaches on the northeast side of town, probably because too many were congregating now that’s it’s warmer here.

I’ve stayed away from Lake MI and the beaches because I don’t want to be around people. But I’m still walking in parks a few times a week where no one is near me because here we only have so many warm months. I love to be around nature, I need it for my sanity, and I don’t want to get fat. I also don’t have a yard of my own.
Shes not getting any exercise sitting in a car.
 
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