Pax LIED and REPORTED that i was DRINKING and APPEARED DRUNK , yet i dont Drink, Smoke or Do Any Dru

YouEvenLyftBruh

Well-Known Member
Everyone out there, please get a DASHCAM . it will save you alot from these ungrateful passengers.

If it makes you feel any better, same thing happened to me, and many many others.

The real statistics on drivers being intoxicated is < .001%

Yet, that doesn't stop uber/lyft from taking the word of cockroach over you, who have passed a background check, etc

This is just the way that trash have found to score a free ride. Yes, these cockroaches network fast.

great advice for others though...
DASHCAM!DASHCAM!DASHCAM!DASHCAM! DON'T WAIT UNTIL IT HAPPENS TO YOU!
 

Demon

Well-Known Member
I never said that Uber does anything wrong when they suspend a driver's access to the app as soon as a complaint comes in that the driver was impaired. In fact, even though I have read so many other people complaining about Uber doing Justice and how Uber is taking the passenger's side. I actually do understand that this is one of those accusations where it is in Uber's best interest is to do exactly that.

Small claims court is about principal, not really about money. Money gets awarded because that's really all the Civil courts are able to do, but it's about principal and restoration of refutation, primarily.

The biggest reason that I say to sue the packs is because that's the only way that you're going to find out who the Pax is and find out exactly what the complaint was, verbatim, and be able to figure out if you actually do have a case. It's the only way that you get to face your accuser.

Put aside the money award and whether or not you're ever going to be able to collect it. Focus on the reputation for a moment. I'm not generally a conspiracy theorist. I know that this is going to sound like I'm a conspiracy theorist. Please bear with me.

I believe that at some point in the future, any personal information that other entities have on us will become available two other entities that we want to deal with. In a lot of ways this is already happening, of course we know this. I think it's going to become more extensive. I think you'll be able to go to a job interview, and the human resources manager will punch in your social security number and get your details employment records from previous employers. Not just employers, but anybody who pays you money and has to report that to the IRS. So even independent contractors driving for Uber would have information available to the next potential employer. If two different people made complaints that they thought you were impaired while driving, and driving professionally, and it resulted in you being deactivated for that reason, would you really want a future employer to be able to see that unless there was also attached to it a judgment for slander and defamation of character? Or at least a lawsuit. Regardless of winning, a potential employer might be a little more willing to discuss the situation with you and get your side of things directly if they see that you did put up a fight immediately.

Once information is being shared like this, of course it's not just going to be about employment and jobs and working and earning money. It's going to be about your car insurance, your health insurance, your life insurance, child custody battles, getting loans, everything. Consider how much closer we are to that scenarios today then we were 30 years ago. That is a lot of change in a relatively short period of time.

And at the end of the day, the only thing you have is your word, and as honest as you may be, people are only going to take your word based on your reputation. Protect your reputation when it comes to important subject matter.
Going after the pax is an awful idea from start to finish.
 

Uber's Guber

Well-Known Member
I believe that at some point in the future, any personal information that other entities have on us will become available two other entities that we want to deal with. I think you'll be able to go to a job interview, and the human resources manager will punch in your social security number and get your details employment records from previous employers. Not just employers, but anybody who pays you money and has to report that to the IRS. So even independent contractors driving for Uber would have information available to the next potential employer. Regardless of winning, a potential employer might be a little more willing to discuss the situation with you and get your side of things directly if they see that you did put up a fight immediately.
I see your point, but let’s view the other side of the coin.
The likelihood that Uber shares information about previous independent contractor drivers is unlikely, because they’re not compelled to respond, and they don’t care to intervene because they have nothing to gain from it. They’ve already washed their hands and they simply move on.
However, a lawsuit filed by a plaintive IS public record, and now a prospective future employee doing a background check will view the file and see a possible new hire that “apparently” has issues regarding impairment on the job, AND is somebody who is a “sue-happy trouble-making” prospect.
If you’re an employer, would you risk hiring that person?....
I know where those applications end up:
 

SuzeCB

Well-Known Member
I see your point, but let’s view the other side of the coin.
The likelihood that Uber shares information about previous independent contractor drivers is unlikely, because they’re not compelled to respond, and they don’t care to intervene because they have nothing to gain from it. They’ve already washed their hands and they simply move on.
However, a lawsuit filed by a plaintive IS public record, and now a prospective future employee doing a background check will view the file and see a possible new hire that “apparently” has issues regarding impairment on the job, AND is somebody who is a “sue-happy trouble-making” prospect.
If you’re an employer, would you risk hiring that person?....
I know where those applications end up:
I also see your point, and appreciate your disagreement without name-calling and attempting ridicule, as some others have done. Thank you.

I think it could depend on the job itself, as well as the prevailing views at the time of the discovery. Also, as I said, I'm actually fairly surprised that when NJ passed our TNC law, affectionately known as 3695, that they didn't require notification to the state or local LEO of the complaint as part of the required "investigation". Sooner or later, Uber will be required to demonstrate what their investigation entails, and I'm pretty sure it's not much--to the detriment of both wrongfully-accused drivers and the safety of the general public. Once info does have to be turned over, it will probably be public record.

And employment wouldn't necessarily be the only issue... custody battles, adoptions, or anything where your credibility is questioned and examined.

And let's not forget, DUI doesn't always mean alcohol. It can mean anything from being a bit sleepy to being drunk to being stoned out of one's mind on heroin. It leaves quite a lot to the imagination of the person looking at the information.

It's an individual call. Individual to the person accused, and individual to the situation surrounding the accusation. Sometimes when someone tries to defend themselves against something, the reaction is "methinks thou doth protest too much." Other times, when someone doesn't, thinking it's just not worth the effort, the reaction is "must've been true, then."

Damned if you do, and damned if you don't, I suppose.
 

peteyvavs

Well-Known Member
SuzeCB, I'm not disagreeing with your statement that drunk drivers should be de-activated, what I'm saying is Uber has a very poor record of protecting passengers and drivers information. I don't trust Uber and Lyft with collecting so much information because sooner or later they'll find a way to make a buck off that information.
I believe any information collected by any company should be erased after a reasonable of time has past except their dates of employment, this will ensure that the people are protected from future exploitation. How many times has peoples Credit Card information been compromised from companies because they store your information long after there was any interaction between the person and the company.
What Uber does is use passenger information without any proof to the truth of the accusation, the driver then is subject to de-activation without ever having due process, this is where the danger exist.
The other point I would like to make is we are independent contractors, Uber and Lyft have no power to dictate to drivers for anything. We rent the use of the app platform by having a percentage of each trip taken by Uber and Lyft, we aren't given the use of this platform for free, so in essence Uber and Lyft has no authority to de-activate anyone as long as Uber and Lyft received their fees.
The reason I'm responding to your post is because I think you are an intelligent individual and worth the time for me to express my opinion.
 

SuzeCB

Well-Known Member
SuzeCB, I'm not disagreeing with your statement that drunk drivers should be de-activated, what I'm saying is Uber has a very poor record of protecting passengers and drivers information. I don't trust Uber and Lyft with collecting so much information because sooner or later they'll find a way to make a buck off that information.
I believe any information collected by any company should be erased after a reasonable of time has past except their dates of employment, this will ensure that the people are protected from future exploitation. How many times has peoples Credit Card information been compromised from companies because they store your information long after there was any interaction between the person and the company.
What Uber does is use passenger information without any proof to the truth of the accusation, the driver then is subject to de-activation without ever having due process, this is where the danger exist.
The other point I would like to make is we are independent contractors, Uber and Lyft have no power to dictate to drivers for anything. We rent the use of the app platform by having a percentage of each trip taken by Uber and Lyft, we aren't given the use of this platform for free, so in essence Uber and Lyft has no authority to de-activate anyone as long as Uber and Lyft received their fees.
The reason I'm responding to your post is because I think you are an intelligent individual and worth the time for me to express my opinion.
Read the changing your contract that occurred in May of 2017. We no longer pay them what percentage. They pay us, but we are independent contractors. We do not have the same protections that an employee would have. A contractor can end its relationship with subcontractors any time it so chooses. In fact, I recently had an attorney go through the contract with Uber. It's specifically says that Uber can end the contract 4 no reason whatsoever, so long as they give 7 days notice. If there is cause, they don't have to give any prior notice.
 

peteyvavs

Well-Known Member
Here is where Uber's contract is not binding, Uber extorted us into signing a contract or we would have been de-activated, we didn't have a choice to negotiate the terms. This is going end up in court because Uber is skirting the law by unilaterally forcing terms of a contract on its drivers as if they were out employer.
I think you need another lawyer if he/she didn't point this out.
 

SuzeCB

Well-Known Member
Here is where Uber's contract is not binding, Uber extorted us into signing a contract or we would have been de-activated, we didn't have a choice to negotiate the terms. This is going end up in court because Uber is skirting the law by unilaterally forcing terms of a contract on its drivers as if they were out employer.
I think you need another lawyer if he/she didn't point this out.
No. If they were an employer, they would not be able to change the contract unilaterally. It is their very status as a contractor dealing with subcontractors that allows them to do this. Each ride that we accept is a new job, entered into under the latest contract that we agreed to.

Each driver absolutely had the right to attempt to negotiate the terms set forth in the amendments. All you had to do was not accept any rides until you did so. Anyone can go into a green light Hub and try to negotiate the contract. You're not going to get anywhere, but you can do it.

This is a standard in any contractor/ subcontractor relationship. They are under absolutely no obligation to continue to give you jobs if you are unable or unwilling to work under their terms. What makes you think you have any protections whatsoever other than those expressly outlined in the contract?
 

peteyvavs

Well-Known Member
No. If they were an employer, they would not be able to change the contract unilaterally. It is their very status as a contractor dealing with subcontractors that allows them to do this. Each ride that we accept is a new job, entered into under the latest contract that we agreed to.

Each driver absolutely had the right to attempt to negotiate the terms set forth in the amendments. All you had to do was not accept any rides until you did so. Anyone can go into a green light Hub and try to negotiate the contract. You're not going to get anywhere, but you can do it.

This is a standard in any contractor/ subcontractor relationship. They are under absolutely no obligation to continue to give you jobs if you are unable or unwilling to work under their terms. What makes you think you have any protections whatsoever other than those expressly outlined in the contract?
Here's the catch. they lease the app to us for a percentage, by doing so they are skirting the law by making unilateral decisions on the lease of the app.
We don't have the ability to negotiate the terms of the contract, even at the hub. Uber is not providing a free service, we pay for that service that is where Uber is going to get its ass in a ringer.
Each State has different laws, some like California won't protect the drivers because the politicians have an incentive for contributions from Uber, but States like New York are looking at this from my perspective and is weighing the impact of Uber's one sided contracts on the drivers and community.
 

moJohoJo

Well-Known Member
Last Weekend, just after my last ride, i was deactivated from UBER , and a message from the support team saying that one of the riders reported that i was Drinking and Driving/ was drunk and under the influence. !!
i had given afew riders some 1 star rating because of rudeness and obnoxious behaviours, so im pretty sure its one of them, i dont know who.

The thing is i dont drink, smoke nor do any form of drugs neither have i ever done any !! This was pure malice from the passengers, bcoz they know they can say anything and try getting away with it. I was so pissed off when i got this message from uber, and i called them immediately , to square it out. I have a high rating as a driver, done about 1300 5 star ratings rides in total with about 160 badges/comments from riders.

The closest thing that ever came to this was a rider threatning me saying that she will make sure im fired from uber, bcoz i was parked at the other exit , different from the one she was at, (mark you, i was exactly at the uber pin drop point). When she realised that i have a dash cam recording both front and back, she was dumbfounded)

Anyway, so with this drunk charge, i immediately went to an open MEDICAL TEST LAB , and took a urine test right away, and i received the results today, that showed i tested negative on everything, for the last 36 HOURS ..! every result was negative, i still have the tests with me,.

So my question is, do i follow up with this on uber, ? or can i file a claim ?
How did the rider come to the accusation and conclusion that i was drinking and driving ? the only cup i had in my car was a macdonalds soda cup, and some fries that i had been eating and sipping slowly that hot day.


Just imagine how many drivers have been falsely accused of such gravely and crimminal ofences by malicious customers and had their accounts deactivated ..!
i want this to be an eye opener not only for me, but also for any uber driver out there, bcoz it can happen to anyone. Everyone out there, please get a DASHCAM . it will save you alot from these ungrateful passengers.

Please Advice. Thank You
THAT'S WHAT THEY ALL SAY . ( I don't drink , drive or smoke ) LOL
 

SuzeCB

Well-Known Member
Here's the catch. they lease the app to us for a percentage, by doing so they are skirting the law by making unilateral decisions on the lease of the app.
We don't have the ability to negotiate the terms of the contract, even at the hub. Uber is not providing a free service, we pay for that service that is where Uber is going to get its ass in a ringer.
Each State has different laws, some like California won't protect the drivers because the politicians have an incentive for contributions from Uber, but States like New York are looking at this from my perspective and is weighing the impact of Uber's one sided contracts on the drivers and community.
They don't "lease the app". And certainly not for a percentage anymore. That ended in May, 2017. That's the point.
 

Bon Jovi

Active Member
Last Weekend, just after my last ride, i was deactivated from UBER , and a message from the support team saying that one of the riders reported that i was Drinking and Driving/ was drunk and under the influence. !!
i had given afew riders some 1 star rating because of rudeness and obnoxious behaviours, so im pretty sure its one of them, i dont know who.

The thing is i dont drink, smoke nor do any form of drugs neither have i ever done any !! This was pure malice from the passengers, bcoz they know they can say anything and try getting away with it. I was so pissed off when i got this message from uber, and i called them immediately , to square it out. I have a high rating as a driver, done about 1300 5 star ratings rides in total with about 160 badges/comments from riders.

The closest thing that ever came to this was a rider threatning me saying that she will make sure im fired from uber, bcoz i was parked at the other exit , different from the one she was at, (mark you, i was exactly at the uber pin drop point). When she realised that i have a dash cam recording both front and back, she was dumbfounded)

Anyway, so with this drunk charge, i immediately went to an open MEDICAL TEST LAB , and took a urine test right away, and i received the results today, that showed i tested negative on everything, for the last 36 HOURS ..! every result was negative, i still have the tests with me,.

So my question is, do i follow up with this on uber, ? or can i file a claim ?
How did the rider come to the accusation and conclusion that i was drinking and driving ? the only cup i had in my car was a macdonalds soda cup, and some fries that i had been eating and sipping slowly that hot day.


Just imagine how many drivers have been falsely accused of such gravely and crimminal ofences by malicious customers and had their accounts deactivated ..!
i want this to be an eye opener not only for me, but also for any uber driver out there, bcoz it can happen to anyone. Everyone out there, please get a DASHCAM . it will save you alot from these ungrateful passengers.

Please Advice. Thank You
Stay away from demanding pax. Remember, you are doing them a favor and not the other way around.
 

Steve appleby

Active Member
I feel bad for drivers who get falsely accused. its just the way our society has become. its sad it really is. if I had it my way I would make it mandatory for all drivers to get a dashcam. its sad because uber will do nothing to change the way the investigations are handled and anything that the government does uber will challenge in court. some people are just pieces of $hit.
 

SatMan

Well-Known Member
Why would a rider continue to be in a car where the driver is "impaired" in any way. I would find a safe place to be dropped off and tell the driver to let me out there. THEN I WOULD CALL THE POLICE. That is how you do it. No police report, file a civil suit. Here in Chicago, it can be as high as $9600. Research the law in your area.... And don't come here looking for answers. NUFF SAID.
 

Demon

Well-Known Member
Why would a rider continue to be in a car where the driver is "impaired" in any way. I would find a safe place to be dropped off and tell the driver to let me out there. THEN I WOULD CALL THE POLICE. That is how you do it. No police report, file a civil suit. Here in Chicago, it can be as high as $9600. Research the law in your area.... And don't come here looking for answers. NUFF SAID.
What would filing a police report do?
 

burgerflipper

Well-Known Member
I also see your point, and appreciate your disagreement without name-calling and attempting ridicule, as some others have done. Thank you.

I think it could depend on the job itself, as well as the prevailing views at the time of the discovery. Also, as I said, I'm actually fairly surprised that when NJ passed our TNC law, affectionately known as 3695, that they didn't require notification to the state or local LEO of the complaint as part of the required "investigation". Sooner or later, Uber will be required to demonstrate what their investigation entails, and I'm pretty sure it's not much--to the detriment of both wrongfully-accused drivers and the safety of the general public. Once info does have to be turned over, it will probably be public record.

And employment wouldn't necessarily be the only issue... custody battles, adoptions, or anything where your credibility is questioned and examined.

And let's not forget, DUI doesn't always mean alcohol. It can mean anything from being a bit sleepy to being drunk to being stoned out of one's mind on heroin. It leaves quite a lot to the imagination of the person looking at the information.

It's an individual call. Individual to the person accused, and individual to the situation surrounding the accusation. Sometimes when someone tries to defend themselves against something, the reaction is "methinks thou doth protest too much." Other times, when someone doesn't, thinking it's just not worth the effort, the reaction is "must've been true, then."

Damned if you do, and damned if you don't, I suppose.
Well, since after about 5000 rides most drivers will have received a false complaint like this, I think the day that becomes law is the day I will quit app driving.

Why put your future employment prospects at risk for a few dollars in the short term? Better to just go on government assistance.
 

SuzeCB

Well-Known Member
Well, since after about 5000 rides most drivers will have received a false complaint like this, I think the day that becomes law is the day I will quit app driving.

Why put your future employment prospects at risk for a few dollars in the short term? Better to just go on government assistance.
It's already started...

Credit checks for car insurance, and it will affect your rates.

Credit checks for jobs.

Social media.

All those sites that will do unlimited background checks on people for a relatively small amount of money per month.

Cameras all over the place.

Every day we lose just a bit more privacy, and the lines between the categories we separate things in our lives into get just a bit more blurred.

I won't call you an ostrich if you don't comment on my tin foil hat, 'K?
 
Top