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Passenger Knocks on My Door - Find My iPhone Locator

UberBastid

Well-Known Member
Who gets to determine what is "reasonable"? I get it that turning it into the police or Sheriff's Office (or other designated agency, such as the Department of For Hire vehicles in the Capital of Your Nation) falls under that definition, but, who gets to determine what other actions fall under the definition of "reasonable"?
In the United States of America - that would be, The Judge.
Or, yea, the jury as Christine said.

But, way before that I'd apply my best poker face and be saying .. "What phone? What are you talking about? I don't have your phone. No, you can not search my car, my person or my home without a warrant. I am not answering any questions unless you want to provide me with an attorney. Now get the @@@@ offa my porch."
 

Fuzzyelvis

Well-Known Member
My friend took a uber once and wanted to test the driver so he purposly left the phone in the car long story short the driver did what you said and he was able to sue her and won 25k that she had to pay
Bull. One post, new poster, nothing since.
 

UberBastid

Well-Known Member
My friend took a uber once and wanted to test the driver so he purposly left the phone in the car long story short the driver did what you said and he was able to sue her and won 25k that she had to pay

Bull. One post, new poster, nothing since.


No, it's true. It really did happen. And it happened to a friend of mine.

But, there's more to the story. The verdict was overturned when the DA discovered that the OP's friend lied about the incident and that he left the phone there on purpose. Then my friend sued his friend for libel, slander and false arrest and won 50k. And the OP's friend also went to jail for two years for perjury.

MY imaginary friends are just as interesting and ethereal as his ever was.
 

Fuzzyelvis

Well-Known Member
It wasn't thrust upon you. It's in your car because you failed to do your job. When you keep someone's property from them by discarding it you're breaking the law. There are no negative consequences from returning it.
Anything left in my car is assumed to be trash. It's not my job to decide what is trash and what isn't.

Nonsense. If you return the phone, you'll get a nice thank you at the least. Tell me one, just one example of how a driver was given a hard time for returning someone's cell phone. Go ahead.


Please explain how claiming you never had it will _keep_ you from getting sued. You can't do it. All a lawsuit has to do is _allege_ that you had it. Even if you never touched it, someone can file a claim in court against you. Winning is different from that. But you'd still have to defend against the claim.
Several examples have already been cited.

There'll be no suit because the lawyer they talk to will laugh at them and tell them go buy another phone.
 

Christinebitg

Well-Known Member
Just to point out the obvious, for anyone not paying close attention.

"who were not there and really do not know what happened"

Those words were not mine.

Every state has a jury selection process. Every judge who presides over a jury trial decides what the jury is or is not allowed to hear as testimony or see as evidence.
 

NYCFunDriver

Well-Known Member
Yes but people have pictures of their kids, pets, work emails, voicemails, etc linked to their phones that you have to realize you are throwing out as well. Some of that isn't replaceable with insurance. Throwing it away is a @@@@@@ move and speaks a lot about how much you care about anyone but yourself. If it happened to you you'd be pissed.
I was about to say the same thing. Depending on the phone, devices cost close to $1000 or more. I always return them.
 
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