• UberPeople.NET - Independent community of rideshare drivers. It's FREE to be a person and enjoy all the benefits of membership. JOIN US! CLICK HERE

No More Uber in Leonia?

Caspita

Well-Known Member
“The first thing the officer is going to say is, ‘Do you have business in Leonia?'” the mayor said.

Yes, I have a pick-up/drop-off.. show it in the app.. done.. no?

Otherwise Uber/Lyft will have no chance but to stop sending pings picking-up/dropping-off on those towns... it'll backslash miserably on legislators once people realizes they cannot longer order Uber/Lyft or any other transportation system lol
 

1974toyota

Well-Known Member

2savage

Well-Known Member
They say 'we think we are legally within our rights'. I beg to differ. Preventing someone being picked up by a vehicle at their home is a violation of the persons civil liberties and more than likely unconstitutional. Life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.

What if the person you are picking up is disabled?
What if they have children and car seats?

What if you already have a rider, that you picked up in Fort Lee and will drop off in West New York? Does the officer have the legal right to ask your passenger where they were picked up? This is an invasion of privacy and passengers cannot be questioned about such things.

They are on thin ice and the first time they stop a lawyer and question him it will all come to a head. Especially when the lawyer has a dash cam.

Finally, the actual act of transporting a passenger via the fastest and shortest route is 'business in Leonia'.
 

Undermensch

Well-Known Member
I didn't read what they are trying to do as anti-Uber but rather anti-Waze.

If your destination is not in Leonia then you really shouldn't be exiting and using local streets to re-enter, particularly at the guidance of a faceless multi-billion dollar company. That company should be made to update their maps to not suggest that route and right now the only way Leonia has to do that is to declare them "private" as Waze has a policy of including that info and following it for nav directions. Essentially Waze will no longer use those roads unless your destination is on those roads. There will not likely be a cop, ever, checking your residence or your destination.
 

1974toyota

Well-Known Member
I didn't read what they are trying to do as anti-Uber but rather anti-Waze.

If your destination is not in Leonia then you really shouldn't be exiting and using local streets to re-enter, particularly at the guidance of a faceless multi-billion dollar company. That company should be made to update their maps to not suggest that route and right now the only way Leonia has to do that is to declare them "private" as Waze has a policy of including that info and following it for nav directions. Essentially Waze will no longer use those roads unless your destination is on those roads. There will not likely be a cop, ever, checking your residence or your destination.
Agreed,I saw this news on CBS last week, CBS & the Mayor in Leonia, never mentioned UBER, they complained that App Maps were telling people to go through Leonia, to avoid traffic or a accident, JMO
 

Caspita

Well-Known Member
I don't think Suze meant this to be an anti-Uber.. just that it could become risky doing ride-share if implemented.. but I think even if it became law and they enforce it, two highly un-probable scenarios, we would have all the right to pick-up/drop-off if the address in the app shows that.
 

SuzeCB

Well-Known Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #9
Agreed,I saw this news on CBS last week, CBS & the Mayor in Leonia, never mentioned UBER, they complained that App Maps were telling people to go through Leonia, to avoid traffic or a accident, JMO
Ok. But I'm not from Leonia. I don't know where the streets are, and need GPS to find the pick-up location. Drop-offs are different, because the pax can guide you. Afterwards, can just pick a direction to go in until the map reappears, I guess.
 

ibeam23

Well-Known Member
I know that area. During rush hour Waze directs you through small suburban roads towards the GWB instead of staying on the main highways Leonia can be a nightmare of traffic.
 

Undermensch

Well-Known Member
Ok. But I'm not from Leonia. I don't know where the streets are, and need GPS to find the pick-up location. Drop-offs are different, because the pax can guide you. Afterwards, can just pick a direction to go in until the map reappears, I guess.
Both of those are fine.

GPS works in both cases.

When a road is marked private in GPS it blocks Waze and other apps from sending through traffic down it.

It's similar to how they won't guide you to get on the parkway via the rest stop entrance for the park and ride (as long as it isn't also an official entrance) but if you set your destination as the park and ride lot it will show you the back way in (usually)
 

ScandaLeX

Active Member
I know that area. During rush hour Waze directs you through small suburban roads towards the GWB instead of staying on the main highways Leonia can be a nightmare of traffic.
Annnnnd this right here is exactly why this was done. Residents complained LOUDLY that due to the amount of increased traffic, they couldn’t often even get out of their own driveways — something about it taking upwards to 1/2 hr or more.
 

Kerplunkenstein

Well-Known Member
They say 'we think we are legally within our rights'. I beg to differ. Preventing someone being picked up by a vehicle at their home is a violation of the persons civil liberties and more than likely unconstitutional. Life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.

What if the person you are picking up is disabled?
What if they have children and car seats?

What if you already have a rider, that you picked up in Fort Lee and will drop off in West New York? Does the officer have the legal right to ask your passenger where they were picked up? This is an invasion of privacy and passengers cannot be questioned about such things.

They are on thin ice and the first time they stop a lawyer and question him it will all come to a head. Especially when the lawyer has a dash cam.

Finally, the actual act of transporting a passenger via the fastest and shortest route is 'business in Leonia'.
Who would ever have guessed getting picked up by an UberX was a "pursuit of happiness"?
 

SuzeCB

Well-Known Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #15
Both of those are fine.

GPS works in both cases.

When a road is marked private in GPS it blocks Waze and other apps from sending through traffic down it.

It's similar to how they won't guide you to get on the parkway via the rest stop entrance for the park and ride (as long as it isn't also an official entrance) but if you set your destination as the park and ride lot it will show you the back way in (usually)
Ah. Ok. That'll work. So long as other towns don't follow suit.

Imagine if this policy went into effect in every suburban town?
 

freeFromUber

Well-Known Member
Ah. Ok. That'll work. So long as other towns don't follow suit.

Imagine if this policy went into effect in every suburban town?
It can’t...first of all, I can’t imagine this ordinance holding up. Sixty streets is a lot of streets.....and what are the cops going to do, pull over every car for no reason other than they are driving on a public road and say, “ what do you think you are doing?” Nice try by the mayor to appease his constituency, but I would be shocked if he can pull it off. Even if he does, it would benefit FUber drivers because there would be less traffic when making a pick up or drop off in Leonia.
 
Last edited:

pvtandrewmalone

Well-Known Member
I don't see this withstanding a legal challenge. It opens the door to many collateral consequences, some serious, some just a minor inconvenience, lack of Uber being one of about a hundred things this could affect.

Also, don't forget what happened the last time someone tried to pull shenanigans restricting the flow of traffic in the vicinity of that same very bridge.
 
Last edited:

SuzeCB

Well-Known Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #18
I don't see this withstanding a legal challenge. It opens the door to many collateral consequences, some serious, some just a minor inconvenience, lack of Uber being one of about a hundred things this could affect.

Also, don't forget what happened the last time someone tried to pull shenanigans restricting the flow of traffic in the vicinity of that same very bridge.
Read the article. Supreme Court has already upheld that towns can control their streets.

Now, whether or not this particular stretch of that right would stand or not, who knows?

Who here would have the money to go to court after court all the way up to the SC to find out? We're talking 100's of 1,000's of dollars here, if not $1,000,000+.

People on here have criticized me when I talk about going to Small Claims court with some of these paxes over damage done to vehicles or money lost because of suspension after a false accusation, but that's just $15 to file, and a few hours of your time.
 

fwdmarch

Active Member
Waze maps are crowd sourced good luck getting everyone to not keep changing the streets back to public.
 

Similar threads


Top