New life rule thanks to uber

WWspeed

Member
Since I've now stepped into customer service, and as A driver I've actually got lives at stake so this is A HUGE
investment/ commitment we make.
That said, in restaurants I now tip according to the same ratio that I am tipped.
I've picked up A few "smellers" and mentioned it to them. The older more seemingly responsible ones get it. The younger ones, their greed exudes.
 

WWspeed

Member
Do you read much? I do, from Plato and Socrates to Shakespeare, Dickens, Austen, Cummings, Poe and onward to Heidegger to include more current authors.
Shakespeare ended sentences with prepositions, he was and is not alone. Faulkner started sentences with conjunctions.
Austen loved double negatives.
Dickens was the grand master of run on sentences.
Maybe monitoring should be left to the wayside.
It's bad enough dealing with cops on corners. Now we have internet po po's also?
Post automatically merged:

It's apparent I'll not be here long.
Black eyes from 2 moderators and A few carriers of the uber holy grail,
 

Mista T

Well-Known Member
Author
Here's a crazy idea...

Before you hit "Post", read what you typed out loud, and see if it makes sense.

I have to do that a lot, or I would look like a bigger idiot than I already am.
 

WWspeed

Member
Make sense for whom?
Im in south Florida, I hear Spanglish, I hear ebonics, I hear redneck all day long.
How they speak isn't for me to cipher, it isn't for me to critique, it isn't for me to criticize.
Same rule should apply here or on the net.
To be plain about it. My address is **** hwy stuart FL, should anyone feel the need to enforce education and writing.
Or message me on the weekends, I'l make my way to PBI or the FLL queue. You can shoot me dead there and solidify your bed to control others.
Shooting me will be your best option.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

ZenUber

Well-Known Member
Do you read much? I do, from Plato and Socrates to Shakespeare, Dickens, Austen, Cummings, Poe and onward to Heidegger to include more current authors.
Shakespeare ended sentences with prepositions, he was and is not alone. Faulkner started sentences with conjunctions.
Austen loved double negatives.
Dickens was the grand master of run on sentences.
Maybe monitoring should be left to the wayside.
It's bad enough dealing with cops on corners. Now we have internet po po's also?
Post automatically merged:

It's apparent I'll not be here long.
Black eyes from 2 moderators and A few carriers of the uber holy grail,
It's a brave new Millennial world now. Grammar went out the window with texting. It was always a work in progress anyway.
Moderator punishments are a right of passage here. I wouldn't respect you if you didn't have at least one. I think they should show up as badges next to our avatars.
 

oldfart

Well-Known Member
I don’t much care about the grammar but the post ought to communicate something, I have no idea what you are trying to say
 

WWspeed

Member
What I am doo-ing now. is. cus-to-mer. ser- vice.
Like bee-ing A wai-ter.
My tips are about 4% of my income after expense.
I have adjusted my tipping back from 22% to 4%.
When I have them as passengers I discuss it.
The older more worldly wait staffers understand,
The millenials cry,,, and cry,,, and cuh-ry,
Post automatically merged:

Ha ha, you just did!! And no one caught it.!!
I actually did, I'm not his daddy though so il not slap his jaw with my whammer.
 

Another Uber Driver

Well-Known Member
Moderator
At last, a bloke in the colonies who knows how to spell the word labour properly.


The funny thing about that is that I did not always use British spellings. That changed when I lived in Canada. I lived in French Canada, in a part of Montréal where English was useless. I read, spoke and heard French all day, every day. The only time that I saw or heard English was once I got to Ontario. In Canada, they use mostly British spellings. I saw them so frequently, that I began to write them, without even thinking about it.


Do you read much?


I do, but, perhaps, as you are fairly new, here, you do not k now me. I have a reputation for several things, on these Boards, one of which is deliberately butchering the English Language and posting intentional oxymorons. "A preposition is something that you do not end a sentence with," falls into the last category. You caught it, allright, but, it popped out of your glove.

Plato and Socrates


If I have anything for which to thank Plato, it is his demonstrating to me why I should not allow anyone to engage me in Socratic Dialectic. Rule Number One of Debate: You NEVER, but NEVER, but NEVER surrender control of the discussion. In Socratic Dialectic, the person asking the questions controls the discussion, thus can force it in the direction that he wants to validate his points and either pass over or invalidate his interlocutor's points.

I have little doubt that Sokrates trapped more than a few of the ancient Athenians in this manner, which likely was why many of them disliked him, so much. I am one of these people who do not buy the traditional view of Sokrates and Plato fed to us by Western education. One of the things rarely taught in the classrooms is the only contemporary view that we have of Sokrates. It is not complimentary. It comes from Aristophanes' comedies. Aristophanes even wrote a comedy that featured Sokrates, Νέφαλοι , The Clouds. Aristophanes also mentions Sokrates in other comedies, such as Βάτραχοι , The Frogs and Όρνιθοι , The Birds. Admittedly, as Aristophanes was a comic poet, you take what he says about Sokrates cum grano salis, but, you must consider that satire does have some basis in reality.

Plato puts an oblique reference to Aristophanes in Sokarates' mouth in his Άπολογία Xenophon does not mention it in his version of the Άπολογία Σωκρατοϋ .

Plato must be taken with a similar grain of salt that you would take Aristophanes. Plato was a pupil of Sokrates, thus would want to show his master in the most favourable light possible. Admittedly, such a point of view is not popular, but, it is not without basis, either. Plato, while a pupil of Sokrates, did not publish his dialogues until long after Sokrates was dead. In addition to his already skewed view (Désans' "angular truth", if you will?"), there is the matter of time.

Xenophon is probably the most unbiased account that we have of Sokrates, Xenophon was sympathetic to Sokrates, but not a disciple. Xenophon's account is third hand, as he was in the Persian Empire at the time of Sokrates' trial. Xenophon did not publish his version of the Άπολογία until some time after Sokrates' death.

to Shakespeare

Wretched, except for Love's Labours Lost.

"
Sir Nathaniel, haud credo"

"'Twasn't a 'haud credo', 'twas a pricket."

...again, certainly not the "approved" view.


, Dickens
,

Difficult to read, but, when you consider that he was paid by the word, you understand what he is doing. There are these two cartoon chipmunks or squirrels, I forget which, now, who used to spoof that type of writing.



...........never that much of a fan.................................

Cummings,

...great poetry; unconventional and daring for his era....................you could almost call him the Frank Zappa of that genre and era...............



........always a good read...................................



Heidegger

........getting through Sartre's mental self stimulations was easy compared to this guy....................



Shakespeare ended sentences with prepositions, he was and is not alone

You must keep in mind that Shakespeare wrote poetry. You get more than a little artistic licence in poetry. Despite that, not ending a sentence with a preposition is more a stylistic convention than a hard rule of English grammar.

.
Faulkner started sentences with conjunctions.

Faulkner thumbed his nose at more than a few conventions. Again, this is more a stylistic convention that a hard rule of English grammar.


Austen loved double negatives.

I will take your word for that as I found Austen unmemorable and unremarkable.

It's apparent I'll not be here long. Black eyes from 2 moderators and A few carriers of the uber holy grail,



No black eye from me.

I ain't taken no virtual swing at you, neither.



No not you, on another thread


One thing that you would do well to avoid, in the future, is discussing moderation actions (or lack thereof) in open forum. That is against forum rules. You can take issue something that a Moderator posts, yes, just as you could take issue with something another Member posts. In both cases, though, kindly do so respectfully and in accordance with forum rules.


Ha ha, you just did!! And no one caught it.!!


He states that he did, but, it did pop out of his glove.

I actually did, I'm not his daddy though so il not slap his jaw with my whammer.


What you missed was that it was deliberate.
 

SuzeCB

Well-Known Member
The funny thing about that is that I did not always use British spellings. That changed when I lived in Canada. I lived in French Canada, in a part of Montréal where English was useless. I read, spoke and heard French all day, every day. The only time that I saw or heard English was once I got to Ontario. In Canada, they use mostly British spellings. I saw them so frequently, that I began to write them, without even thinking about it.





I do, but, perhaps, as you are fairly new, here, you do not k now me. I have a reputation for several things, on these Boards, one of which is deliberately butchering the English Language and posting intentional oxymorons. "A preposition is something that you do not end a sentence with," falls into the last category. You caught it, allright, but, it popped out of your glove.




If I have anything for which to thank Plato, it is his demonstrating to me why I should not allow anyone to engage me in Socratic Dialectic. Rule Number One of Debate: You NEVER, but NEVER, but NEVER surrender control of the discussion. In Socratic Dialectic, the person asking the questions controls the discussion, thus can force it in the direction that he wants to validate his points and either pass over or invalidate his interlocutor's points.

I have little doubt that Sokrates trapped more than a few of the ancient Athenians in this manner, which likely was why many of them disliked him, so much. I am one of these people who do not buy the traditional view of Sokrates and Plato fed to us by Western education. One of the things rarely taught in the classrooms is the only contemporary view that we have of Sokrates. It is not complimentary. It comes from Aristophanes' comedies. Aristophanes even wrote a comedy that featured Sokrates, Νέφαλοι , The Clouds. Aristophanes also mentions Sokrates in other comedies, such as Βάτραχοι , The Frogs and Όρνιθοι , The Birds. Admittedly, as Aristophanes was a comic poet, you take what he says about Sokrates cum grano salis, but, you must consider that satire does have some basis in reality.

Plato puts an oblique reference to Aristophanes in Sokarates' mouth in his Άπολογία Xenophon does not mention it in his version of the Άπολογία Σωκρατοϋ .

Plato must be taken with a similar grain of salt that you would take Aristophanes. Plato was a pupil of Sokrates, thus would want to show his master in the most favourable light possible. Admittedly, such a point of view is not popular, but, it is not without basis, either. Plato, while a pupil of Sokrates, did not publish his dialogues until long after Sokrates was dead. In addition to his already skewed view (Désans' "angular truth", if you will?"), there is the matter of time.

Xenophon is probably the most unbiased account that we have of Sokrates, Xenophon was sympathetic to Sokrates, but not a disciple. Xenophon's account is third hand, as he was in the Persian Empire at the time of Sokrates' trial. Xenophon did not publish his version of the Άπολογία until some time after Sokrates' death.



Wretched, except for Love's Labours Lost.

"
Sir Nathaniel, haud credo"

"'Twasn't a 'haud credo', 'twas a pricket."

...again, certainly not the "approved" view.


,

Difficult to read, but, when you consider that he was paid by the word, you understand what he is doing. There are these two cartoon chipmunks or squirrels, I forget which, now, who used to spoof that type of writing.




...........never that much of a fan.................................



...great poetry; unconventional and daring for his era....................you could almost call him the Frank Zappa of that genre and era...............




........always a good read...................................





........getting through Sartre's mental self stimulations was easy compared to this guy....................





You must keep in mind that Shakespeare wrote poetry. You get more than a little artistic licence in poetry. Despite that, not ending a sentence with a preposition is more a stylistic convention than a hard rule of English grammar.

.

Faulkner thumbed his nose at more than a few conventions. Again, this is more a stylistic convention that a hard rule of English grammar.




I will take your word for that as I found Austen unmemorable and unremarkable.







I ain't taken no virtual swing at you, neither.






One thing that you would do well to avoid, in the future, is discussing moderation actions (or lack thereof) in open forum. That is against forum rules. You can take issue something that a Moderator posts, yes, just as you could take issue with something another Member posts. In both cases, though, kindly do so respectfully and in accordance with forum rules.





He states that he did, but, it did pop out of his glove.




What you missed was that it was deliberate.
Show-off! ? :p
 
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